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  1. This is some shocking stuff after 3 hospital turned a woman away she had to give birth on a roadside! lost for words no basic right to dignity what so ever
  2. Sikh separatist leader condemns Kabul gurdwara attack, requests India to shelter minorities from Afghanistan ANI | Updated: Mar 28, 2020 15:15 ISTFounder of Dal Khalsa and UK-based Sikh separatist leader Jaswant Singh Thekedar (File photo) London [UK], Mar 28 (ANI): Jaswant Singh Thekedar, the founder of Dal Khalsa - a Sikh separatist organisation, has condemned the barbaric attack on a historic gurdwara in Kabul and requested the Indian government to shelter the remaining families of Sikhs and Hindus from Afghanistan. On Wednesday, armed terrorists killed 25 civilians in a terror attack on the 400-year-old Gurdwara in Shor Bazar in Kabul. The Islamic State affiliate in Afghanistan claimed responsibility for the attack, but many experts believe that Pakistan's spy agency, the Inter-Services Intelligence (ISI), propagated it to oppose Ashraf Ghani, who was re-elected as the President of Afghanistan last month. In a video message, Singh said, "In Afghanistan, the way the Taliban carried out a barbaric attack on the Sikhs in Kabul's historic gurdwara and killed children and women who were praying for the people affected by coronavirus pandemic is highly condemnable." "The attackers are not religious people and they have no humanity. They have only one motive to call others as 'kafirs' or infidel and kill them. It is also preached in their holy book. This is an unforgettable incident for the Sikhs," he added. The separatist leader also stated that he has requested the Indian government to allow the remaining Sikhs and Hindus from Afghanistan to get them settled in India. "Our request has been accepted and after the COVID-19 crisis. Whoever will apply for a visa, the Indian government will facilitate them," he said. "We are thankful to the Indian authorities. We are also reaching out to the victims' families with all possible help. We are your brothers. The horrific attack has happened on the entire Sikh community. We all stand together with your pain," Singh added. The Sikh community in the war-torn country that once constituted a vibrant, well integrated and economically active part of the Afghan society has been persecuted and driven away, since the Taliban grabbed the reins in the 1990s. Their depletion has been so rapid that of the once close to a quarter of a million population, only a minuscule 1000-odd still remain in the country, barely eking out a livelihood amid extremely violent circumstances. (ANI)
  3. For those who don't know who Allama Muhammad Iqbal was, he is widely known as Allama Iqbal, was a poet, philosopher and politician, as well as an academic, barrister and scholar in British India who is widely regarded as having inspired the Pakistan Movement. He is called the "Spiritual Father of Pakistan." and to this day islamist supremacist extremists in pakistan often quote his poetry when talking of muslim separatism. Seeing how influential allama iqbal's poetry was and still is to the consciences of punjabi muslims back before partition and desire for separate nationhood. Do we have such a figure a poet in our history or present times who captures the mood and struggles of the Sikh nation?
  4. Punjab’s unemployment rate more than national average 21.6 per cent jobless in Punjab | Farm crisis worsens situation in villages Posted: Mar 07, 2020 06:21 AM Updated: 11 hours ago Tribune News Service Ruchika M Khanna Tribune News Service Chandigarh, March 6 The unemployment rate in Punjab is more than the national average, reveals the state’s latest Economic Survey that was tabled in the just concluded Budget session of the Vidhan Sabha. The survey report belies the claims made by the Congress government of making efforts to reduce unemployment. Report belies govt’s claims 11.7% women 6.9% men 7.6% rural areas 7.7% urban areas As per the report, the unemployment rate among the youth (between 15 and 29 years) of the state is 21.6 per cent against the national average of 17.8 per cent. The survey cites the figures, taking into account the first year of the Capt Amarinder Singh government in 2017-18. This in spite of the state organising job melas and launching schemes such Apni Gaddi Apna Rozgar (54,513 youths reportedly got jobs till 2019), Yaari Enterprises and StartUp Punjab. “The mismatch between the aspirations of the youth and job opportunities is the reason behind the high unemployment rate. Unemployment is more prevalent in rural areas and women. With heavy mechanisation of farming, rural youth may be finding it difficult to get jobs,” reads the report. The unemployment rate among women reduced between 2015-16 and 2018, but it was still higher (11.7 per cent) than men’s (6.9 per cent). To substantiate the mismatch between aspirations of youth and job opportunities, the survey cites that of the 2.69 lakh applicants registered with the Unemployment Bureau in 2019, 85 per cent were educated (Class X and above) and 91 per cent were categorised as skilled. “This is leading to brain drain from the state,” the report says. As agriculture growth has reached a plateau, children of farmers are migrating abroad in search for jobs. The survey highlights that more and more farmers are selling off their land to fund the migration of their children to Canada, Australia, the US and the UK. The survey points out that unemployment rate in rural and urban areas was 7.6 and 7.7 per cent, which had increased by two to 1.5 percentage points, respectively, since the previous Economic Survey. The survey report also lists steps taken by the government to bridge the gap between skill sets of youth and job opportunities, while pointing out that agriculture and allied activities still accounted for maximum employment followed by the manufacturing sector and construction activities.
  5. Anyone know about the application process for a OCI card? Also what are the benefits of obtaining one? I was interested in buying some property in Punjab. But at the moment no foreigner is allowed to buy unless they get this OCI card. This is suppose to give people of Indian origin all the rights as those that were born there. Such as being able to travel visa free, opening business ect..But it's quite costly I heard and not sure about the limitations.
  6. Chillianwala – the forgotten British defeat Previous Next Previous Next Lt. Col Muhammad Arslan Qadeer (Rtd) 4:59 PM | January 08, 2020 Just 35 Kms south west of Kharian located on the eastern bank of the river Jehlum is the village of Chillianwala. Insignificant as it looks and unknown to most, this small village apparently is no different to the vast countryside surrounding the Kharian Garrison on either side of the GT road. Nevertheless, it is this singular and unique honor attached to the village of Chillianwala or Chillianwallah as it was spelled then, to have served as one of the biggest and bloodiest battlefields in the history of warfare. The Anglo-Sikh war of 1849 is perhaps one of the few battles which go down in history symbolizing the greatest military debacles the British had suffered. Right on the entrance to Chillianwala, on the western side of the road situated on a high ground is the gleaming gigantic grandeur of the obelisk made of red sand stone reverberating the great battle fought under the British Commander in Chief Lord Hugh Gough and Sardar Sher Singh Attariwala. On four sides of the structure are the inscriptions in English, Hindi, Urdu and Persian. Enclosed in the same premises are the five graves in perfect condition. Out of these, two in the foreground are thought to be of Brigadier John Pennycuick and Brigadier Alexander Pope. The gravestones however are regrettably missing. Just adjacent to it is another premises housing a giant metallic cross resting on a huge foundation. The main inscription reads: A Cruce Salus To record the names of the brave officers who fell in the great battle fought on the adjoining plain, 13 th January 1849. The Cross was placed beside their tombs by Richard 6 th Earl of Mayo Viceroy and Governor General 1871. On the western side of the base holding the cross is inscribed the long list of names of European officers killed in the battle. The first two in the list are Brig John Pennycuick Commander 5 th Brigade and Brig Alexander Pope Commander 2 nd Brigade of Cavalry, the two being the senior most officers in the British side among a total of 2357 casualties on 13 January 1849. On the eastern side are the infantry, Cavalry and artillery unitsthat took part in the battle. The battle of Chillianwala is unique as it marked the foundation of the Indian rebellion and led to the great uprising of the native armies then under the control of the East India Company. Chillianwala marks the biggest debacle wherein the British was defeated most decisively despite beingmilitarily and logistically overwhelmingly superior. In addition to military preponderance, the British also enjoyed towards their side the advantages of favourable terrain and weather as opposed to that in Afghanistan in the three Anglo afghan wars – the situational factors so fondly highlighted by British historians. As the story goes, it all started after the death of Ranjit Singh (1839) when his incompetent sons proved to be too weak to hold the throne. Karak Singh his first successor could not stick around for long and was deposed within four months. Another son Naunehal Singh though a very capable and competent person met a premature death after being crushed under a falling arch. He was succeeded by one of Ranjit Singh’s many illegitimate sons who was despised by the elders and nobles of the court and was soon removed from power. It was then Rani Jindan, one of the many wives of Ranjit Singh and a former dancing girl usurped power ruling in the name of Duleep Singh, her five year old son. Rani Jindan along with her hindu confidants was wary of the strength of the sikh army. She knowing well that her fragile marriage with power could fizzle out any time struck a deal with the British which envisaged destruction of the sikh military might and continuation of her rule. To materialize the plan the sikh army was incited and launched across the Sutlej river (The Anglo-Sikh boundary) to invade East India Company’s territory. As a result of treachery and poor leadership the sikh army was thus decisively defeated on the 10 th of February 1845 and the Sikh state came under the domination of the English East India Company. Henry Lawrence, who was the British Resident, became the de facto ruler overlooking the affairs of the state on behalf of the infant Duleep Singh. The Sikh army had been humiliated and felt that it had not been defeated militarily but merely betrayed by its leaders who wanted destruction of the Sikh army and acted treacherously. Later in April 1848, Diwan Mulraj, the Governor of Multan, which was the southern Punjab province of the Sikh State rebelled against the British regent and all the sikh troops at Multan joined him. To suppress this uprising the British organized three columns to march towards Multan; one under General Sher Singh, one under Lieutenant Edwards and one under Lieutenant Lake to recapture Multan. Consequently, in August 1848 a siege was laid against the city of Multan. On the 14th of September Sher Singh with all his troops crossed over to the rebel side. Sardar Sher Singh Attariwala as he was known, after consultation with Mulraj decided to move north of the Chenab River. His father Chattar Sigh the Governor of Hazara province who had already rebelled, joined him by occupying the strategic Attock Fort. Thus the British lost almost the whole area north of the Chenab River in addition to the Multan Fort. The Governor of East India Company had meanwhile issued orders for the invasion of Punjab and crush the sikh rising under the leadership of the overall Commander-in-Chief of India and also the East India Company’s private Bengal Army, General Sir Hugh Gough. On the 11th of January 1849, Gough resolved to attack Sher Singh’s position the centre of which rested a few miles west of Chillianwala. On the 12th of January while carrying out a reconnaissance, he discovered that the Sikh had swung forward. On discovery of the Sikh position so close to Chillianwala, Gough decided to attack the Sikh position on the next day that is 13 Jan 1849. The British Army was divided into two infantry Divisions (3 rd and 2 nd ) with a Cavalry Brigade each on outer flanks. The 3rd Division commanded by Brigadier General Colin Campbell formed the left or southern Division launched an enthusiastic but reckless attack based on a conventional bayonet charge. Though they did manage to reach the Sikh positions, however in the process the punishment inflicted was too severe. The Sikh counter attacked and the assailants withdrew in disorder towards Chillianwala. The leading Brigade Commander Brigadier Pennycuick and his son Lieutenant Alexander Pennycuick killed in the bloody engagement. The 2nd Infantry division commanded by Major General Sir Walter Gilbert formed the right (northern) division. Gilbert’s leading Brigades aptly supported by artillery successfully cleared all Sikh positions in front and drove the Sikhs close to the River Jehlum. While Gilbert was reorganizing for the final assault, he was suddenly counter attacked by the Sikhs in force from his rear. This happened due to the fact that his integral cavalry brigade which was commanded by Brigadier Pope and was responsible to guard the right (northern) flank and rear of Gilbert’s Division, completely overrun by the ferocious cavalry charge of the Sikhs leaving the right and rear flank vulnerable to counter attack. Sher Singh Attariwala immediately ordered a counter attack and Sikh infantry and cavalry located on the north-west hills immediately advanced down from the heights through the open gap created by the absence of Brigadier Pope’s cavalry and encircled Gilbert’s division from the rear followed by a ruthless massacre. The damage done at Chillianwala to the prestige of British might was enormous and played a major role in changing the attitude of native states towards British leading directly to the ‘Great Sepoy Rebellion’ (The war of independence 1857) in which the British almost lost their Indian Empire and the English East India Company whose private Bengal Army had fought Chillianwala lost India to the British Crown. https://nation.com.pk/08-Jan-2020/chillianwala-the-forgotten-british-defeat
  7. Ensaaf.org is working with people in Punjab whose families were killed by the police and authorities in the 80s and 90s. They have a interactive map on the site documenting all the victims and have made victim profiles they have documented over 5000 victims Waheguru https://ensaaf.org/ On the interactive map you can see the areas where the killings took place, Amritsar region had it the worst
  8. After waiting ages to take a DNA test, I finally got around to it recently. The results were, for the most part, what I expected. Here's my estimate: Asia - 85.4% South Asian - 79.9% West Asian (Iran, Afghanistan, Iraq, Caucasus, Turkey) - 4.3% Central Asian (Afghanistan, Tajikistan, Turkmenistan, Uzbekistan, Kazahkstan) - 1.4% Europe - 14.6% North and West Europe Irish, Scottish, and Welsh - 11.6% Scandinavian - 3.0% Even though these are only estimates, they give an idea of my ethnicity in a broad sense. Nonetheless 14.6% is still considered a fairly large proportion in an estimate, and in all honesty was completely unexpected. My knowledge on DNA and genealogy are probably basic at best but from what I've read such a large percentage of the European could be traced back as early as the 5th or 6th generation before me! This estimate didn't really tell me much as I would have liked to know so I decided to use GEDmatch to get a more in-depth picture. The results were certainly interesting (Jagsaw Singh if you're still around I'm sure you'll be the most pleased). For the sake of the topic I'll mention that I'm Punjabi Jatt. This is what I found out: Baloch - 37.94% (The term Baloch is used here to loosely describe Persian origin) South Indian - 29.43% (South Indian here refers to indigenous or native Indian) NE-Euro - 11.70% (oddly the Baltic region) Caucasian - 11.30% (Armenia, Georgia, Azerbaijan - again part of the Greater Persian Empire) SW-Asian - 2.28% (ambiguously referring to Persian, Caucasian, and Arabian) Mediterranean - 2.25% (most likely Greek, Cypriot, Turkish) The rest is negligible. You are also given an approximation how closely you are linked and compare to the individual populations of the sampling done by the genealogists, here are the top ten from highest to lowest: 1) Punjabi-Jatt-Sikh 2) Punjabi-Jatt-Muslim 3) Punjabi-Khatri 4) Pushtikar-Brahmin 5) Kashmiri-Pandit 6) Punjabi 7) Kashmiri 8) Punjabi-Brahmin 9) Rajasthani-Brahmin 10) Singapore-Indian What do you think? I was surprised at some of the detail it went into and some of it was actually expected - I have always explained to people how we very likely had Persian and possibly some European ancestors. Although I probably won't, personally I would love to lay claim to my Persian heritage! Has anybody here taken a test? What labels, if any, do I use now...Persian Jatt I think the moral here is we shouldn't be so narrow-minded.
  9. I know there are a lot of fake corrupt charities, ashrams and babeh in Punjab and it's hard to trust these people, but i think this young man is genuine and is doing seva from his heart. Does anyone know anything about him? He doesnt collect money but asks for building material to expand the buildings. It's really sad to hear the stories of these vulnerable people. People who hurt and tortured these vulnerable people are pure evil. Government has nothing in place for these people who really need help.
  10. government just proves against how useless it is. most these people are poor. With all this dirty water it's only gonna spread disease everywhere, especially with the dead animals floating and the sewers. you can donate to khalsa aid international. They seem to be doing a lot. Waheguru meher Kare
  11. You see this kind of sh1t in the news a lot. No different to the stories from charitropakhyan. https://www.google.com/amp/s/www.indiatoday.in/amp/crime/story/wife-kills-husband-poison-affair-punjab-1572436-2019-07-23
  12. Guest

    Attachment to Community?

    Wjkk wjkf If I feel a sense of belongingness towards my motherland, would that be 'attachment' if viewed through the lens of Sikhi, because Guru Gobind Singh ji told us to recognise the entire human race as one? Many (not all) Sikhs speak up for Punjab only but not for the people of other states where people are facing some or the other sort of injustice. The way Muslims are being targeted in India these days , even to the extent of trying to force them to convert, is shameful, yet I do not see any brother or sister taking a stand for them. [Diaspora Sikh readers may think whether they are doing enough for their respective countries' non-Sikhs.] We sure do langar sewa but is that all we should be doing? Have we failed to follow true Sikhi? Why are we not standing up for ALL people? Is it the attachment towards our motherland/community that's causing us to see things blurry? Or would it be practically far fetched to think of such things at the moment? Wjkk wjkf
  13. A great programme watch downloading for future and showing your family and friends https://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/b0bfnldw
  14. You hear stories of how Jinnah the founder of Pakistan had offered Sikhs the choice of making Pakistan their home, which means that rather than carving Punjab into half, the majority of Punjab would of been included in the Pakistan side of the border, the Sikh leaders apparently refused the offer. Don't know how true this story is but its one of the many stories you hear regarding the fate of Sikhs and 1947. So lets say if All of Punjab was carved into Pakistan side of the border then what would be the current state of the Sikhs? that would be aprox 25 million Sikhs living in Pakistan. Would Sikhs be in a better state or would it be worse? would life be easier or worse ? 25 million is a big population of non muslims residing in a muslim country also, do you think Sikhs would culturally be different if they were from a majority Islamic country or would Sikhs be the same as Sikhs are today your opinions ...
  15. Why are Deras seeing so much success in Punjab? My family particularly has been going to a small dera for generations and having recently gone back to Punjab, I've seen so much anti-gurmat things at these kind of places. I especially noticed that the Radha Soami dera leader has immense influence in the Doaba region. I see his photo in every other house/shop. Is there rise in power correlated to Sikhi getting weaker? Are there any ways to combat Deras in a non-Taliban approach? Lol. Is there a way to make the people understand and critically think why their supporting these Deras rather than going towards Sikhi? I've personally tried to point out the anti-gurmat ways of the sant my family worships and they think I've been brainwashed and pretty much stop me from saying anything negative against "Babaji" saying that he's done alot for the family.
  16. interesting lecture, history of tobacco in India
  17. https://www.thesundaily.my/local/flying-sikh-dies-in-motorcycle-accident-in-india-XF160356?fbclid=IwAR1cjHNrd7nBhNc1pVdZlHO26fxBBLXLZChrOHGC1WcLSDSOK_jkrhDiYrU
  18. I know its Pakistan but the situation is identical in Punjab, India. Looking at his documentary i couldn't help but think what a waste of money. Pathetic. The worst part is when he says when the parents die the first thing the kids do is sell the building and take the money for themselves.
  19. Lovely channel giving historic knowledge about current state of Sikhi in Punjab , Ranjit Singh is so straight like an arrow to the target
  20. Talk eight as advertised on Sikh Discover Inspire taking place at Khalili Lecture Hall london EC1H 0XG , Sunday 9th Sept 2018 at 15:00 , ticket 5GBP: The series continues with our eighth talk, in which historian and ethnomusicologist, Radha Kapuria, establishes how Punjab emerged as a major centre for classical music patronage under Maharaja Ranjit Singh, revealing the particular centrality of sword-yielding, cross-dressing female dancers in his diplomatic negotiations with political rivals. This illustrated talk will be followed by a Q&A session. Radha Kapuria trained as a historian at the University of Delhi before joining the Jawaharlal Nehru University for her MPhil degree. Her research investigated the oldest classical music festival of north India- the Harballabh of Jalandhar, Punjab. She built on this ‘micro-history’ by researching a more macro-level social history of music in the region during the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries for her PhD at King’s College London. She currently divides her time between preparing a book manuscript titled Music in Colonial Punjab: A Social History, based on her PhD, and working as part-time Lecturer in Ethnomusicology at King’s. This lecture series has been organised by the UK Punjab Heritage Association (UKPHA) in partnership with the SOAS South Asia Institute (SSAI). Image: Dancing girls and musicians at the Court of Lahore, by Bishan Singh, 1874 (Collection of Prince and Princess Sadruddin Aga Khan)
  21. http://www.sikh24.com/2018/06/29/op-ed-misogyny-in-the-khalistan-movement-view-of-a-kaur/#.WzXeLnrwbcs I was sent this article and found it to be very accurate and on the ball. However, as much as i agree with this article, i think this article could be expanded even further. yes the typical khalistani in the uk is male, amritdhari and lashes out when anyone opposes their views. trust me i used to be exact the same. but taking a step back since i have moved away from birmingham, i can see that by restricting the movement to black and white, is never take the movement forward. the movement never was restricted to just amritdharis, initially the Anandpur Sahib mata was for all Punjab. secondly, Sant ji being the great visionary that he was, actively sought those who had broken away from sikhi i.e the smugglers, gangsters etc. thirdly, even at the peak of the movement, a lot of the kharkoos were not just gursikhs, a lot were well known guys in their areas and that gave them the base to branch out to other like minded guys and had girls who helped them out. so if you compare that to now, in general the khalistanis are seen as extremists by most sikhs (which hurts me to say), while the so called khalistanis are quick to alienate anyone who doesnt agree with them and give themselves in front of their own circles the hype about how panthic they are. from sant ji to baba manochahal, brahma, budhsinghwala to mintoo, these had enough vision to realise that if you want the sangaarsh to move forward, then all types of sikhs need to be involved, whether that is gursikhs, non gursikhs, male/female, young/old or anything else.
  22. Which one of these ? Pakistan wants to destroy sikhi and is throwing drugs on the indian side of border . This was shown in movie "Udta Punjab". Indian govt is aware of pakistan doing it but couldn't care any lesser because it helps keep sikhs broken and pacified so they don't do another insurgency like the 80s. Indian govt is purposely doing it so as to destroy sikhi youth and thus destroy any rebellious tendencies so as to safeguard its own territorial integrity. Badal ke are involved. Its more of a social issue than a political one . And sellouts among sikhs and gangster elements responsible for drug menace
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