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Found 35 results

  1. mahandulai

    The Hidden Genocide

    Hi all, The genocide in 1984 is confirmed, thousands of Sikhs targeted and killed, but whats the point of talking about it today?
  2. Seems to me far fetched honestly lol . I mean genocide of all sikh people . This is hard to believe . Is it made up ?
  3. I have heard and read this expression from atheist's who argue you don't need to follow a religion to know the difference between what is right or wrong thing to do or have morals. I would strongly disagree because: 1) Without a good religion (such as sikhi) you could be indoctrinated to follow some other ideology which could tell you its ok to commit murder, rape, robbery against the person who isn't from your group. 2) What is right in one religion/ideology can be wrong in another. E.g.slaughtering an animal in agnosing death then eating meeting its meat such as beef is perfectly fine in judaism/Islam. However in hinduism killing a cow is a sin and wrong and slaughtering animals inhumanely is wrong other non-abrahamic faiths. E.g Its wrong in islam to worship more than 1 God other than arab pagan moon God Allah however in hinduism it's not wrong and you can worship millions of Gods. 3) Evolution theory which atheists look too for existence of everything see's no right or wrong when it comes to genociding/extincting whole species/races of people. Because its the survival of the fittest if your group is not strong enough to out compete those who are trying to undermine or harm you then you do not deserve to exist as per the evolution theory. It is only a firm adherence to sort of civilized belief systems, a religion that has kept humanity from destroying each other to the point of existence as was the case when modern humans fought with other human species (such as Neanderthals) where eventually those others died off due to genocide.
  4. 13Mirch

    India's Guilty Secret

    La Noche Triste Pav Singh’s 1984: India’s Guilty Secret and the continuing Sikh night of sorrows. Is catastrophe a precursor to genocide or is genocide a spontaneous outburst of violence- essentially a riot? The misnomer of riot to veil genocide is nowhere more evident than in the Indian state’s treatment of the anti-Sikh pogroms of November 1984. Whereas the political-cum-social discourse of the majority community has condensed the event into the misbranded Delhi Riots, for the survivors they were a well-executed genocide. It is axiomatic that justice delayed is justice denied; Pav Singh in his 1984: India’s Guilty Secrethowever goes a step further- on the basis of the survivors’ accounts which he recounts lucidly- Singh contends that November was by no means a riot. It was the culmination of a long drawn out plan to inflict such wounds on the Sikh psyche that the community would never again agitate for civil rights in the Indian union, and assimilate into the greater neo-Hindu political fold (Hindutva). Radical, in scope, 1984 has swiftly dethroned existing analyses of that apocalyptic November and portends change in the global perception of genocide. 1984, from the onset, does not exercise restraint. It is vivid in it’s recounting of the horrors which the Sikhs faced in the aftermath of Prime Minister Indra Gandhi’s assassination. Whereas the mass rapes of Sikh girls and women have often been downplayed in the works of Khushwant Singh and Nayer, Pav Singh elects to focus on how it was employed as a tool to humiliate Sikh males before they were doused in kerosene and set on fire. His almost calm narration of events is enough to render even the most staunch of readers chilled. A fourteen year old boy is forced to witness the gang-rape of his mother; a whole family is hurled out of their residence to witness their daughters being stripped nude, urinated upon and then raped by hordes of mourners (as consecutive political accounts would refer to the culprits). Sikh males are set alight whereas groups of Sikh women are rounded up and held outside Delhi in a semi-concentration camp where they are continually violated. The myth that only Sikh males were targeted is effortlessly effaced by Pav Singh who dedicates an entire chapter to the sexual atrocities suffered by Sikh women. The attitude of doctors, police, and general society towards the victims of rape are also scrutinized. Elements of all three would be instrumental in evicting victims from aid camps and returning them to their prior locii which, in most cases, would be in ruins. The fortunate would escape; the unfortunate would once again fall into the hands of their violators. Another complex facet, of the November pogroms, which has hitherto been obscured is what happened to the Sikh policemen and military personnel in Delhi? 1984 unabashedly substantiates, based on official documentation, how all Sikh serving personnel in Delhi were ordered to take leave in the early hours of November 1st ’84. Most would have had no idea, other than that Indra Gandhi had been gunned down by her Sikh bodyguard duo the night before, of the inferno which awaited them outside their official precincts. Weaponless, they would have walked straight into effective death traps. Military personnel, serving or otherwise, would have fallen prey to armed mobs on the nation’s railway network. Were Sikhs only targeted at train stops? Pav Singh systematically exposes this canard, again relying on official documentation, to evidence that at least forty-six unauthorized train stops were made which allowed assembled mobs to slay all Sikhs on board. For Sikhs, the primacy of Pav Singh’s work hinges on three crucial factors: 1.) It effectively refutes the misnomer of riot. 2.) Whilst paying tribute to the few brave souls who risked life and limb to save Sikhs, it also depicts the callousness of politicians, police and neighbors who betrayed the Sikhs by rendering them defenseless in the face of bloodthirsty mobs. 3.) It refutes the theory of Delhi Riots. Detailed maps provide evidence of sanguinary pogroms executed in Gujrat, Uttar Pradesh, Maharashtra, Tamil Nadu, Assam, West Bengal and Agartala. Candid, impenitent and critical- Pav Singh’s 1984 is radical in it’s approach to the November pogroms. Though sections of the Indian media are criticizing Singh, his work should be judged with impartiality; India’s Guilty Secret not only recounts the atrocities inflicted on the Sikhs, but also exposes the political/social cohesion via which the events of November ’84 transpired. The theory of Nanak Jayanti, an alleged rumor which posits that the pogroms were intended for execution on the birth celebrations of Guru Nanak Dev Ji (founder of the Sikh faith) for maximum damage, is also analyzed by Singh. Victim statements are taken into account which depict the conditions outside Punjab in the aftermath of the ill-construed Operation Bluestar. Sikh businesses and residences were often transcribed with a S symbol in the lead-up to November; on the night of 31st October teams were employed to scour several cities in a mission to place this S on all Sikh locations. On the 1st of November the grim significance of this symbol would become transparent as mobs marched on all such identified locations. Nanak Jayanti, caught out by Gandhi’s demise, had been implemented earlier to teach the troublesome Sikhs a bloody lesson. What of the judiciary and the aftermath? Singh, in a brief list, provides an exposition of all the failed commissions which attempted to tackle November ’84 but failed to provide even token justice for the victims. He ends on a poignant note; the survivors of ’84, forgotten by all, are shown as suffering from the trauma of the atrocities inflicted upon them. The state is continually failing in it’s mandate to provide them justice; the social discourse veils their trauma whereas the same ideology which preyed upon them is today gaining ground nationwide. Justice delayed is justice denied, justice denied is justice perverted. https://tisarpanthdotcom.wordpress.com/2018/02/25/la-noche-triste/
  5. 13Mirch

    India's Guilty Secret

    La Noche Triste Pav Singh’s 1984: India’s Guilty Secret and the continuing Sikh night of sorrows. Is catastrophe a precursor to genocide or is genocide a spontaneous outburst of violence- essentially a riot? The misnomer of riot to veil genocide is nowhere more evident than in the Indian state’s treatment of the anti-Sikh pogroms of November 1984. Whereas the political-cum-social discourse of the majority community has condensed the event into the misbranded Delhi Riots, for the survivors they were a well-executed genocide. It is axiomatic that justice delayed is justice denied; Pav Singh in his 1984: India’s Guilty Secrethowever goes a step further- on the basis of the survivors’ accounts which he recounts lucidly- Singh contends that November was by no means a riot. It was the culmination of a long drawn out plan to inflict such wounds on the Sikh psyche that the community would never again agitate for civil rights in the Indian union, and assimilate into the greater neo-Hindu political fold (Hindutva). Radical, in scope, 1984 has swiftly dethroned existing analyses of that apocalyptic November and portends change in the global perception of genocide. 1984, from the onset, does not exercise restraint. It is vivid in it’s recounting of the horrors which the Sikhs faced in the aftermath of Prime Minister Indra Gandhi’s assassination. Whereas the mass rapes of Sikh girls and women have often been downplayed in the works of Khushwant Singh and Nayer, Pav Singh elects to focus on how it was employed as a tool to humiliate Sikh males before they were doused in kerosene and set on fire. His almost calm narration of events is enough to render even the most staunch of readers chilled. A fourteen year old boy is forced to witness the gang-rape of his mother; a whole family is hurled out of their residence to witness their daughters being stripped nude, urinated upon and then raped by hordes of mourners (as consecutive political accounts would refer to the culprits). Sikh males are set alight whereas groups of Sikh women are rounded up and held outside Delhi in a semi-concentration camp where they are continually violated. The myth that only Sikh males were targeted is effortlessly effaced by Pav Singh who dedicates an entire chapter to the sexual atrocities suffered by Sikh women. The attitude of doctors, police, and general society towards the victims of rape are also scrutinized. Elements of all three would be instrumental in evicting victims from aid camps and returning them to their prior locii which, in most cases, would be in ruins. The fortunate would escape; the unfortunate would once again fall into the hands of their violators. Another complex facet, of the November pogroms, which has hitherto been obscured is what happened to the Sikh policemen and military personnel in Delhi? 1984 unabashedly substantiates, based on official documentation, how all Sikh serving personnel in Delhi were ordered to take leave in the early hours of November 1st ’84. Most would have had no idea, other than that Indra Gandhi had been gunned down by her Sikh bodyguard duo the night before, of the inferno which awaited them outside their official precincts. Weaponless, they would have walked straight into effective death traps. Military personnel, serving or otherwise, would have fallen prey to armed mobs on the nation’s railway network. Were Sikhs only targeted at train stops? Pav Singh systematically exposes this canard, again relying on official documentation, to evidence that at least forty-six unauthorized train stops were made which allowed assembled mobs to slay all Sikhs on board. For Sikhs, the primacy of Pav Singh’s work hinges on three crucial factors: 1.) It effectively refutes the misnomer of riot. 2.) Whilst paying tribute to the few brave souls who risked life and limb to save Sikhs, it also depicts the callousness of politicians, police and neighbors who betrayed the Sikhs by rendering them defenseless in the face of bloodthirsty mobs. 3.) It refutes the theory of Delhi Riots. Detailed maps provide evidence of sanguinary pogroms executed in Gujrat, Uttar Pradesh, Maharashtra, Tamil Nadu, Assam, West Bengal and Agartala. Candid, impenitent and critical- Pav Singh’s 1984 is radical in it’s approach to the November pogroms. Though sections of the Indian media are criticizing Singh, his work should be judged with impartiality; India’s Guilty Secret not only recounts the atrocities inflicted on the Sikhs, but also exposes the political/social cohesion via which the events of November ’84 transpired. The theory of Nanak Jayanti, an alleged rumor which posits that the pogroms were intended for execution on the birth celebrations of Guru Nanak Dev Ji (founder of the Sikh faith) for maximum damage, is also analyzed by Singh. Victim statements are taken into account which depict the conditions outside Punjab in the aftermath of the ill-construed Operation Bluestar. Sikh businesses and residences were often transcribed with a S symbol in the lead-up to November; on the night of 31st October teams were employed to scour several cities in a mission to place this S on all Sikh locations. On the 1st of November the grim significance of this symbol would become transparent as mobs marched on all such identified locations. Nanak Jayanti, caught out by Gandhi’s demise, had been implemented earlier to teach the troublesome Sikhs a bloody lesson. What of the judiciary and the aftermath? Singh, in a brief list, provides an exposition of all the failed commissions which attempted to tackle November ’84 but failed to provide even token justice for the victims. He ends on a poignant note; the survivors of ’84, forgotten by all, are shown as suffering from the trauma of the atrocities inflicted upon them. The state is continually failing in it’s mandate to provide them justice; the social discourse veils their trauma whereas the same ideology which preyed upon them is today gaining ground nationwide. Justice delayed is justice denied, justice denied is justice perverted. https://tisarpanthdotcom.wordpress.com/2018/02/25/la-noche-triste/
  6. http://www.sikh24.com/2017/08/20/more-evidence-of-british-govt-cover-up-in-amritsar-1984-attack-role/ Also I noticed the leaked document that caused storms in 2014 is not available in the national archives to view freely even though 30years+ have passed and those secret docs are now widely available in the public domain when they were accidentally uncovered by journalist phil miller. There is a huge coverup going on hopefully the 2 elected Sikh MP's together with John Mcdonal and Tom watson will help unlock those documents hidden away in secret vaults.
  7. Memorandum submitted to the UN Secretary General, President of the UNHRC & High Commissioner for Human Rights Ban Ki-moon United Nations Secretary-General Joachim Rücker President of the United Nations Human Rights Council (UNHRC) Prince Zeid bin Raad High Commissioner for Human Rights 30 October 2015 GENOCIDE & KILLINGS OF RELIGIOUS MINORITIES IN INDIA Over 1,000 Sikhs from over a dozen countries have today gathered outside the United Nations office in Geneva to mark the 31st anniversary of the November 1984 Sikh Genocideand highlight the continued killings of religious minorities in India. Lack of justice for the Sikh Genocide of November 1984 The Indian Home Minister Rajnath Singh in late December 2014 referred to what happen to the Sikhs in November 1984 as Genocide and that justice would be meted out to the victims only when the perpetrators of the crime are punished and that until these persons are punished, victims will not get relief. This is at odds with the recent decision in September 2015 by the Central Bureau of Investigation (CBI) to give a clean chit to one of the leading culprits, Jagdish Tytler. UN-led inquiry into the 1984 Sikh Genocide The Indian state ordered the army to attack the Sri Harmandir Sahib Complex in June 1984.The BJP who are now in power in India are on record as supporting and even encouraging and wanting that attack sooner. This was set out by L K Advani in his book My Country, My Life. There is a need for a UN-led inquiry into the atrocities committed in June 1984, the killings and disappearances in the months that followed and the systematic and deliberate killing of innocent Sikhs in November 1984. The UN inquiry should also look into the use by the police of criminals, goons, gangsters and smugglers to impersonate Sikh militants, widely known as Black Cats. Prosecution of police officers involved in human rights violations in Punjab To resolve the political conflict with the Sikhs international admission of the truth around widespread human rights violations by India is essential. For over 30 years UN rapporteurs and independent experts as well as Amnesty International have been denied access to Punjab to investigate widespread allegations of torture, disappearances, false encounters and extra-judicial executions. If India wishes to be taken seriously it must allow the truth to emerge by removing such restrictions, allowing independent investigations followed by prosecutions. Release of Sikh political prisoners There are 84 known Sikhs political prisoners languishing in India's prisons some have been in prison for over 25 years. The list consists of 1 death row conflict, 20 life term prisoners who are mainly in Punjab's prisons and many have served their minimum terms, 8 senior citizens whose health has deteriorated and 55 other Sikhs held in various states around India, such as UP, Haryana, Jammu and Jaipur. One of the first steps for resolving political conflicts is the release of all political prisoners and a general amnesty for those that have cases pending. Oppression of religious and ethnic minorities in India The present Indian Government has clear Hindutva objectives and the current Indian Prime Minister, Narendra Modi, trained with the ultranationalist right wing Hindu group, the Rashtriya Swayamsevak Sangh (RSS). The RSS is a Hindu nationalist paramilitary group that has been involved in extreme violence, including acts of terrorism and been banned several times in India. This includes when RSS member Nathuram Godse assassinated Mahatma Gandhi in 1948. The most recent ban was in 1992 after the demolition of the BabriMasjid. The BJP government led by Narenda Modi presents a significant threat to religious and ethnic minorities in India with the declaration by right wing Hindu groups that they will ensure India becomes a Hindu Rashtra by 2021. These groups have an objective of attacking the Sikh faith so it leads to its eventual assimilation and is driving a campaign to convert Muslims and Christians to Hinduism by force. There have been numerous examples of forced conversions since Narendra Modi came to power in May 2014. Following Indian independence Sikhs refused to be signatories of the Indian Constitution as Article 25 denies Sikhs exist as a distinct religion with a separate identity. Successive Indian governments have refused to amend Article 25 and various laws concerning the Sikh way of life (i.e. marriage, inheritance, adoption etc.). The current Chief Minister of Punjab burnt a copy of the Indian Constitution in Delhi on 27 February 1984 to press the then Union Government to amend the Constitution. The current BJP government, although supported by the Chief Minister of Punjab is plainly opposed to make any changes. In January 2015 President Obama while speaking in Delhi criticised the Modi led BJP government by making a plea for freedom of religion to be upheld in India, a country with a history of strife between Hindus and minorities. In a veiled threat he also warned otherwise India could break up. Recent attacks on the Sikh faith and killing of peaceful Sikh protesters In recent weeks we have seen the desecration of Sri Guru Granth Sahib Ji, the Sikh Holy scriptures and the eternal living Guru of the Sikhs. Following an incident at Bargari village in Faridkot district tens of thousands of peaceful Sikh protesters pitched their tents in Kotkapura demanding the arrest of those responsible for tearing off more than 100 pages of Sri Guru Granth Sahib Ji. In shocking scenes on the morning of 14 October 2015 the Punjab Police used lethal force against the peaceful Sikh protesters without warning while they were undertaking their morning prayers. The police initially used batons to attack the peaceful protestors and then resorted to use of water cannons full of sewage water to try and disperse protesters. Later they opened fire with live ammunition killing two unarmed Sikh protesters and injuring dozens of others. In appalling and horrific scenes hundreds of Sikhs exercising their democratic right to peacefully assemble and protest were beaten, dragged away and arrested reminding everyone little appears to have changed since 1984 in terms of a disregard for Sikh lives and police brutality. These shocking scenes have caused global outrage within the Sikh Diaspora. Tough and speedy action is needed against police officers responsible for the killings and brutality and arrests and prosecution of those who desecrated Sri Guru Granth Sahib Ji, our living Guru. Application of self-determination to the Sikhs & demand for an independent Sikh homeland, Khalistan Acceptance by India of the general principle that self-determination is a basic human right founded in international law and it applies to the Sikhs. Withdrawal of Indias reservation at the UN Human Rights Council that self-determination does not apply to the people of India. Internal self-determination by Sikhs since 1947 has been violently rejected and crushed with state terror so remedy via external self-determination is possible. The persecution of Sikhs in 1984 and in the years that followed and the lack of justice is the basis on which the Sikhs continue to raise the legitimate demand for an independent Sikh homeland, Khalistan. A Sikh homeland will not be a sovereign nation just for Sikhs, but will allow all who live there to be respected and encouraged to practice their faith. It will allow us to protect Sikhi, the Sikh way of life and identity given to us by our Gurus across the globe wherever Sikhs choose to live. Equally important is that a Sikh homeland will allow the universal message of our Gurus to be shared and disseminated in a way that has never been possible in the modern era. https://m.facebook.com/story.php?story_fbid=905405449547675&id=440939405994284&ref=bookmarks
  8. #‎IndiraGandhi was assassinated today in #1984. Watch this short clip from our #‎Genocide1984 digital documentary. To view the full video see our facebook page videos section &/or watch it on youtube at This is a low resolution version specifically designed for mobile viewing etc https://m.facebook.com/story.php?story_fbid=983423621715390&id=591752574215832
  9. Sumedh Saint has been replaced as Punjab Police Chief be a similar person Suresh Arora. http://m.ndtv.com/india-news/punjab-police-chief-replaced-after-scripture-desecration-row-1236180
  10. Abhorrent and laughable news from India, the world's next superpower and the proud nation where people have to be forced to use toilets: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-3097640/The-Luft-wafer-Ice-cream-cone-named-Adolf-Hitler-sale-India-sparks-anger-Germany.html Is it any wonder that the Indian state has perpetrated genocides left, right and centre against Sikhs, Tamils, Kashmiris and more, when one considers that they take no issue with snacks, bars and restaurants immortalizing a mass murderer ? Or when her own people exist in such a state of ignorance that they barely even know what the holocaust was, and understand nothing of the nature of genocide? Or when Nazi collaborators like Subhas Chandra Bose are magnified and treated as national heroes?
  11. ਵਾਹਿਗੁਰੂਜੀਕਾਖਾਲਸਾ॥ ਵਾਹਿਗੁਰੂਜੀਕੀਫਤਿਹ॥ UK MP John McDonnell says Sikh Genocide of 1984 was similar to the Jewish Genocide in Germany by Adolf Hilter London: On the eve of the premier of upcoming movie ‘Patta Patta Singhan da Vairi’ on April 12, UK MP John McDonnell said that the Sikhs were subjected to genocide in 1984 by the Indian state just like the Nazi regime of Hitler subjected Jews to genocide. Talking about the Sikh Genocide of November 1984, MP John McDonnell said that this was sequel of the genocide of the Jews in Germany by Adolf Hitler. File photo - MP John McDonnell While appreciating lyricist turned singer cum actor Raj Kakra, MP John McDonnell said that ‘Patta Patta Singhan Da Vairi’ movie portrays the tragedy of Punjab. The ‘Daily Ajit’ reveals that the story of the movie revolves around a Sikh youth, whose father becomes a victim and is shot by the Indian Army during the armed attack by Indian State on Darbar Sahib, Amritsar in June 1984. It also demonstrates the tales of atrocities committed by Punjab Police on civilian population of Punjab during the last two decades of 20th century. The movie also elaborates the state conspiracy in rampant drugs abuse in Punjab. It is notable that ‘Patta Patta Singhan Da Vairi’ movie was initially denied clearance by the Central Board of Film Certification (CBFC) but it was later cleared by Film Certification Appellate Tribunal (FCAT). The movie is set to hit screens worldwide on April 17.
  12. ਵਾਹਿਗੁਰੂ ਜੀ ਕਾ ਖਾਲਸਾ, ਵਾਹਿਗੁਰੂ ਜੀ ਕੀ ਫਤਿਹ New Gandhi statue unveiled in London's Parliament Square The British prime minister, David Cameron, and India’s finance minister, Arun Jaitley, were joined on Saturday by Gandhi’s grandson, the former governor of West Bengal, Shri Gopalkrishna Gandhi, and Indian actor Amitabh Bachchan for the inauguration ceremony. http://www.theguardian.com/world/2015/mar/14/new-gandhi-statue-unveiled-in-londons-parliament-square During Sikh New Year's day, David Cameron participated in insulting Sikhs by hosting Indian actor Amitabh Bachchan, who is alleged to have incited racial hatred and genocide against Sikhs, for the inauguration ceremony. A leading German historian said Mahatma Gandhi was "one of the greatest friends of Nazi Germany" because the Indian activist and the Third Reich shared a shared a common enemy in Britain. Gandhi's quote on the Children Of Israel "the Jews should have offered themselves to the butcher's knife. They should have thrown themselves into the sea from cliffs." Gandhi insisted on referring to Sikhs as "hindus" and said "I read your Granth Sahib. But I do not do so to please you. Nor shall I seek your permission to do so. But the Guru has not said anywhere that you must grow your beards, carry kirpans (swords) and so on". Gandhi attacked Gurmukhi. In a letter to a friend, Amrit Kaur, he wrote, "I wish you would persuade enlightened Sikhs to take the Devnagri script in the place of the Gurmukhi". The UK government aided India in planning Sikh genocide during 1984.
  13. On the 27th of jan, the bbc asian network invited amitabh bachchan for an interview/show whatever it was. Some time in december early jan, the public could book tickets to be a part of the audience. Did anyone from here go? Bachchan has some serious allegations against him as well as a court case pending in New York regarding his role in the 84 genocide. Namely, inciting genocide on door darshan with slogons of "khoon ka badla khoon". As far as im aware, 4/5 years back sajjan kumar was refused entry into the UK because of his alleged involvement in the genocide. So why is this case any different? Is it because we made a big deal of it back then, contacted our mps etc and therefore the gov under pressure refused him entry? Should we be doing something about this? Complaining to the bbc/ gov/ whoever? I've sent a complaint to the bbc, pretty straight forward simple enough to do. Follow: https://ssl.bbc.co.uk/complaints/forms/?reset=#anchor What are your thoughts?
  14. ਵਾਹਿਗੁਰੂ ਜੀ ਕਾ ਖਾਲਸਾ, ਵਾਹਿਗੁਰੂ ਜੀ ਕੀ ਫਤਿਹ In 1984, India exposed its true nature and feelings towards Sikhs by carrying out Sikh genocide. Since then, hundreds of thousands of Sikhs have been slaughtered. Every day, Sikh injustice continues. Phase 1 of State Terrorism began in June 1984 with the Genocide of Punjab and Sri Harmandir Sahib, Amritsar. Five months later, when the Sikh bodyguards delivered justice personally to Prime Minister Mrs Gandhi, Sikh genocide against innocent Sikhs was renewed. This led to mass violence against the Sikh population in Delhi and all over India. Phase 2 began on 31st October when the government used the hindu masses to slaughter Sikhs in cold blood. Hindu killer squads celebrate Sikh genocide. Was Indira Gandhi a corrupt, ruthless and evil military dictator? Yes... Indira Gandhi is most famous for her State of Emergency. On 12 June 1975 the High Court of Allahabad declared Indira Gandhi's election to the Lok Sabha void on grounds of electoral malpractice. The court thus ordered her to be removed from her seat in Parliament and banned from running in elections for six years. Within a few months, the president's rule was imposed on the two opposition party ruled states of Gujarat and Tamil Nadu thereby bringing the entire country under direct Central rule or by governments led by the ruling Congress party. Police were granted powers to impose curfews and indefinitely detain citizens and all publications were subjected to substantial censorship by the Ministry of Information and Broadcasting. Indira Gandhi was dictator of India for two years. Indira Gandhi ended the emergency in 1977. She grossly misjudged her popularity by reading what the heavily censored press wrote about her and proceeded to hold elections, lost them, and was forced to step down. Indira Gandhi would later return to office. Since 1984, the Indian state has continued to carry out extra judical killings, deny Sikh's justice, undermine Sikh institutions, subvert the Sikh youth and back anti-Sikh organisations. We have made much more information available; http://www.discoversikhism.com/sikh_genocide/1984_delhi_genocide.html http://www.discoversikhism.com/sikh_genocide/human_rights.html
  15. Indian Government Makes Committee to Analyze 1984 Sikh Victim Cases NEW DELHI, India (December 24, 2014)—On Tuesday the Indian government constituted a committee to look into various grievances of the 1984 Sikh pogrom victims. The statement said, “The ministry of home affairs has been receiving a large number of complaints from various individuals in the matter of 1984 ‘riots.’ The team will look into their grievances.” The committee consists of retired Supreme Court judge Justice G.P. Mathur as the chairman, and J.P. Aggarwal as joint secretary in the ministry as a member secretary. The statement also read that the committee would look over the usage of payment of enhanced indemnity of 5 lakh rupees for every person killed during the 1984 massacres as approved by the cabinet on December 10, 2014. The committee will also look further into the need for the Constitution of Special Investigation Team (SIT) for also investigating the 1984 massacre cases and submit their reports within three months. Source: http://www.sikh24.com/2014/12/24/indian-government-makes-committee-to-analyze-1984-sikh-victim-cases/#.VJrneF4Cbo
  16. The Widow Colony is an award winning 74 minute film (available to buy from http://www.SikhiStore.com) that takes an in-depth look into the lives of the widows of the Sikh men who were killed in the anti-Sikh massacre of November, 1984. The film, directed by Harpreet Kaur, explores the suffering of these women, their battle for justice and their struggle for survival in India. "The Widow Colony – India’s Unsettled Settlement" by Sach productions borrows its name from the settlement in Tilak Vihar, on the west-side of New Delhi, which is locally called the Widow Colony or Vidhva Colony. The film takes the viewer to the areas of Trilokpuri, Kalyanpuri, Sultanpuri and Mongolpuri, the same localities that suffered the major brunt of the Sikh killings in November of 1984. Along with the testimonies of the widows, supplemented with imagery of the killings and destruction that followed after the assassination of Prime Minister Indira Gandhi, the film conveys the intensity of the tragedy that occurred 30 years ago. More information can be seen at: http://www.sikhistore.com/product/the-widow-colony-dvd/
  17. http://sikhsiyasat.net/2014/11/01/punjab-bandh-under-pressure-from-hindutva-forces-badal-govt-arrests-sikh-activists-genocide-victims/ Punjab Bandh: Under pressure from Hindutva forces Badal govt. arrests Sikh activists, genocide victimsAmritsar, Punjab: The Punjab police has reportedly launched arrest drive to defuse Punjab Bandh call by AISSF and other Sikh bodies to protest against denial of justice to the victims of November 1984 Sikh Genocide. Sikh Siyasat News (SSN) sources revealed that the Punajb police has arrested Sikh activitsts and victims/ survivors of Sikh Genocide 1984 in wake of 1 November Punjab Bandh (Punjab Shut Down) call. Sources told Sikh Siaysat News (SSN) that around 60 people have been arrested so far in Amritsar alone. Bibi Jagdish Kaur, Karnail Singh Peermohammad and others arrested by Punjab police to defuse Punjab Bandh Call The Amritsar police arrested AISSF president Karnail Singh Peermohammad along with Sikh genocide survivor Bibi Jagdish Kaur and around 40 more persons when they were marching towards Amritsar Railways station. Karnail Singh Peermohammad, Bibi Jagdish Kaur arrested by Punjab police [November 01, 2014] It is notable that BJP leader Lakshami Kanta Chawla had warned Badal government against Punjab Bandh. Hindutva leader had demanded that the Badal government should ensure that no disturbances are allowed in road and railway traffic. The Punjab Bandh or Punjab shut down call was given by All India Sikh Students Federation (AISSF) and victims-survivors of the Sikh Genocide 1984 as a token protest against denial of justice to the victims of Sikh genocide 1984. The organizers of the Punjab Bandh were appealing to all sections of the society to observe shut down and show sympathy with the cause.
  18. Mehtab Singh

    1984 Genocide: Four Acquitted

    For want of concrete evidence, a Delhi court on Wednesday acquitted four people, including three retired policemen, of murdering three men during the 1984 anti-Sikh riots here. Acquitting the then station house officer (SHO) of Nangloi, Ram Pal Singh Rana, then assistant sub-inspector Dalel Singh, then head constable Karam Singh, and a man named Satpal Gupta, additional sessions judge Kamini Lau observed: The material and evidence on the record does not bridge the gap between truth and reasonable doubt. The court also noted that the case was based on circumstantial evidence and the investigation had not been conducted professionally in the manner it ought to have been. It further said even the witnesses who should have been the eyes and ears of the court had failed to support the prosecution case. They had retracted from their earlier statements, it observed, adding that there was little that the state or the courts could do; and to shift the entire blame on the prosecution and the investigating agency would be highly unfair when the prosecution witnesses, the alleged victims on whose assertions the case has been registered, are themselves inconsistent and do not support their earlier versions. Noting with regret that there was little it could do in the absence of more proof, the court said it could not cull out a favorable judgment for the victims on the basis that this was a special case. Whether, it is an ordinary crime or a crime emanating due to communal frenzy, law does not make any distinction either in leading of evidence or in its assessment and the rule is one and only one namely, if depositions are honest and true and the witness so examined credible then a conviction can be even based on the sole testimony of such a witness, the court said. The three former police officers and Gupta were facing trial for the alleged murder of Sikh men Swaroop Singh, Amrik Singh and Trilochan Singh on the morning of November 2, 1984, at Nangloi in West Delhi. The case was registered on the recommendation of Justice Ranganath Mishra Commission, based on affidavits and statement that Gurbachan Singh, son of victim Swaroop Singh, had submitted in 1991. Prem Chand Jain and Ram Niwas Tunda were other accused; but proceedings against them were dropped when they died during the trial. http://www.hindustantimes.com/punjab/chandigarh/1984-anti-sikh-riots-four-acquitted/article1-1268025.aspx
  19. DiscoverSikhism

    The Last Killing

    Waheguru Ji Ka Khalsa, Waheguru Ji Ki Fateh Ensaaf is a nonprofit organization working to end impunity and achieve justice for mass State crimes in India, with a focus on Punjab. Ensaaf is proud to present The Last Killing, an original documentary that chronicles police whistleblower Satwant Singh Manak’s fight for justice for the survivors of ten victims of unlawful killings. May 23 2014, marks 21 years since the Punjab Police filed false cases against Manak to punish him for standing up for human rights. On April 2, Ensaaf helped Manak file an appeal to the Supreme Court. Join Manak and Ensaaf in the fight for justice by promoting the online release of The Last Killing. www.ensaaf.org
  20. Waheguru Ji Ka Khalsa, Waheguru Ji Ki Fateh. Article from http://asrandhawa.wordpress.com/ (May 2, 2014) Australia made history when it welcomed a mass murderer from India Amitabh is an alleged mass murderer, a perpetrator of 1984 Sikh genocide. Today Australia has announced scholarship on his name, the day is not far when Australia may declare another scholarship to honor Adolf Hitler, Mussolini, Stalin and Goebals. If a mass murderer of India can be honored, why not Nazis? Amitabh the alleged mass murder couldn’t dare to enter in Princess theater but chose back door, made mockery of agitators on stage inside, protesting against him outside in the venue. Kaur, who lost members of her family for no fault of theirs, recollects the incident, “I watched the live relay on Doordarshan and saw Amitabh Bachchan shouting the slogan – ‘Khoon ka badla khoon se lenge!‘. And everyone who saw the live telecast would know how Amitabh Bachchan provoked the riots.” The violence led to huge personal loss for Kaur – her husband and son were murdered as she watched, killed by a frenzied mob inside her house in West Delhi on November 1, 1984. Sadly, she also lost her three brothers, who were burnt to death. Racial vilification is the term in the legislation of Australia that refers to a public act that encourages or incites others to hate people because of their race, nationality, country of origin, colour or ethnic origin. Public acts of this type are illegal according to e.g., the Racial Vilification Act 1996 of South Australia. So, why has Australia chosen to ignore its principles and embrace a man accused of instigating Sikh genocide?
  21. ਸਚੁ ਕਰਤਾ ਸਚੁ ਕਰਣਹਾਰੁ ਸਚੁ ਸਾਹਿਬੁ ਸਚੁ ਟੇਕ ॥ True is the Creator, True is the Doer. True is our Lord and Master, and True is His Support. Vaheguru Ji Ka Khalsa Vaheguru Ji Ki Fateh. Guru Pyare SadhSangat Jio, Registered Charity Seva84 would like to share with you some of our recent work. On 21st December 2011 Akhand Path Sahib was aramb at Gurdwara Shaheed Ganj Sahib, Tilak Vihar for the blessings of: 1. Better standard of living for all victims of genocide and true ensaaf 2. Success of seva84 projects and for genocide survivors in Delhi who are currently living in appalling conditions 3. Ekta and chardi kala of the sikh panth Together with your support, Seva84 strives to provide these poor and needy Sikhs from genocide affected families with the things they need; Education, Healthcare and Employment to enable them to stand on their own two feet, become self sufficient and lift them self out of poverty. Our Seva84 projects are focused on Victims of 1984 Genocide, we are fully aware of their needs, and have had them observed and assessed by professionals – we have been given recommendations for successful projects accordingly. First Batch of Rickshaw Distribution http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bs_xN2NIXM0 (Guru Sahib beant kirpa di naal a second batch will be distributed shortly to the most needy families within the colonies to make them self sufficient as they once were). For individual cases of those who were allocated rickshaws, please visit our facebook page (link below). Door to Door surveys and financial assessments was used to select the most needy families for rickshaws. Key persons in Delhi who work with survivors of genocide were also requested to recommend those who are in desperate need of employment, as well as a panel recommendation and selection team. The panel consists of representatives from all communities living within the colonies as this helps to avoid any bias. Education Matters http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NLOBDiqxWS4 http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NLOBDiqxWS4 When children are not in school, they are exposed to drugs, which has already taken the lives of many first and second generations in the genocide colonies. Since making this video, Seva84 has supported the education of more families in need. The Aftermath – short film on how 1984 genocide survivors are currently living (in appalling conditions) http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vNGYNM4apOo http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vNGYNM4apOo Seva84 Projects are not quick and easy. There are deep rooted issues which require specialist help from specialist organisations whom we have, and are forging relationships with. With Guru Kirpa and your support, this seva has been possible. Despite having minimal income, we do our best to maximize output (benefit to the survivors of genocide currently living in deep poverty and squalor conditions). All members of Seva84 UK work unpaid on a volunteer basis to maximise the use of your donations. If you feel you can contribute to seva84 in any way either practically, financially or otherwise please do get in touch. We are a small team of sevadars and welcome any input from the sangat. Seva84 was initially designed to be inclusive, for all sangat contribute and better the lives of those who have already suffered, and continue to suffer below the poverty line. Once again, we thank Guru Sahib and Guru’s Sangat for making this seva possible. Related Links Below. Vaheguru Ji Ka Khalsa Vaheguru Ji Ki Fateh www.seva84.com www.justgiving.com/seva84 www.facebook.com/seva84online (you can join our page by clicking like ! )
  22. Bhai Iqbal Singh Bhatti on Hunger Strike at Jantar Mantar, Delhi for 38 Days now. His demands are 1)Release of Prof. Devinderpal Singh Bhullar 2)Punish those responsible for 1984 Sikh Genocide 3) Open a fast track court for achieving justice for 1984 Victims Show Your Support We support Bhai Gurbaksh Singh Khalsa
  23. Jaspreet Singh’s novel Helium confronts memories of the 1984 pogrom against the Sikhs. http://metro.co.uk/2013/11/26/jaspreet-singhs-harrowing-novel-of-genocide-in-the-wake-of-indira-gandhis-assassination-4201439/ In November 1984, after Indira Gandhi’s assassination, politicians of India’s Congress party directed mobs to burn alive as many Sikhs as possible. Members of parliament and cabinet ministers distributed kerosene oil and white phosphorous. Witnesses talked about the use of rubber tyres to trap the target, create thick clouds of toxins and facilitate combustion. I was a teenager in Delhi. A mob passed our block, attacking Sikhs on the street. We hid in a neighbour’s house. The few hours we were there fill a huge space in my mind. I’ve not been able to articulate those few hours, the burned remains of the books and buildings I saw later and the tiny particles of ash floating in the air. For years I tried hard to forget those moments. Raj, the narrator of Helium, faces a huge predicament. His own father, a senior police officer, facilitated the violence in November 1984. The police were under direct control of the government. Under the watchful eyes of the cops, a mob directed by senior Congress party leaders burned alive Raj’s beloved professor. Later, Raj asks a question, which may be significant to younger generations in India: How do sons and daughters deal with the crimes of their fathers? I wrote my first story, Arjun, in 2000. I had flown to San Francisco for a conference but skipped most of it and finished the first draft in 14 straight hours. Arjun is told from the point of view of a Sikh boy travelling with his mother and grandfather on the day of Indira Gandhi’s assassination. My plan was to allow Arjun to grow into a novel but when I picked it up, I felt a narrative crisis. Most known models were inadequate to narrate November 1984. I had to figure out a new way to write. Helium was a resolution of a creative crisis. In 2008, after finishing my first novel, I was invited to Delhi to work with HIV-positive orphans. They wanted ghost stories. After storytelling, I took long walks through the city and it was then the ghosts of 1984 returned. As I processed those Delhi experiences, walking with the ghosts, I started writing. Helium has a hybrid form to better access the pogroms of November 1984 and the years that followed. It let me reveal traces of the horrific. To do it otherwise – as in a human rights’ report – is a paralysing affair and affects our capacity as humans to engage fully with the crime of crimes. Helium’s hybrid form allowed me to pose questions such as: ‘What happened?’ and ‘What could have happened?’ It also allowed me to create distance. Despite all this, it was not easy to write. Helium involved a lot of research and is informed by survivor and relief-worker testimonials and is based on oral histories and private archives. These are stories of complicated grief and collective trauma. Unfinished mourning. Not just memory but post-memory and the transmission of trauma. It was not easy. Several times I tried to abandon the project. Helium (Publisher:Bloomsbury) is out now by Jaspreet Singh Books
  24. Some community leader apparently SUPPORTED Ron Leech comment, and threw in several remarks about SIkhs as well SEE http://www2.canada.com/calgaryherald/news/story.html?id=6e452021-c216-47ef-9701-da22ec1b9617&p=1 Last month, hundreds of Sikhs went to Parliament to demand that the government of India grant clemency for a convicted terrorist Balwant Singh Rajoana, who was the backup suicide bomber in the assassination of an Indian political leader. NDP justice critic Jagmeet Singh demanded the same thing in Ontario's legislature. Rajoana belonged to the banned Babbar Khalsa terrorist group, which fought in the 1990s for the establishment of a pure Sikh nation called 'Khalistan.' The movement called for the ethnic cleansing of the Hindu minority in India's Punjab state and was responsible for the bombing of an Air India jet which slaughtered 330 mostly Hindu Canadians. An Ontario MPP should be commenting on justice issues in Ontario, not using his status to stand up for convicted terrorists in a faraway land. Hundreds of Sikh Canadians happily protest in favour of this terrorist, but when have we ever seen large numbers of these people picketing on a purely Canadian issue? Shockingly, Pardeep Nagra, manager of employment equity at the Toronto District School Board, admits to having numerous discussions with youth about 'Khalistan' and sees nothing wrong with the concept. This may explain why some second generation Sikh Canadians are becoming brainwashed into supporting a genocidal ideology which is dead in the land of its origin. And ultimately, we Canadians are responsible for the presence of not insignificant numbers of people who reside here but dream of slaughtering people overseas.
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