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Nishan Sahibs And Battle Standards

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Waheguru Ji Ka Khalsa Waheguru Ji Ki Fateh !!

I have received a lot of feedback from the pictures I posted of the Battle Standards at Lichfield Cathedral - some negative but mostly positive.

Many asked for more pictures especially pictures of old Nishan Sahibs and pictures of the "Symbols" used before the introduction of the modern Khanda symbol.

It is not my intention to offend anyone, that is why I carefully avoided the use of 'Nishan Sahib' in the first post and this one and used the more neutral term 'Battle Standard'.

Hope you enjoy the pictures !

Bhul Chuk Maaf

Ranjit Singh 'Freed'

These are guilded panels from Gurdwara Baba Atal Rai Sahib - they date from the mid 19th century

In this first panel you see Guru Gobind Singh Ji with his beloved Singhs - the Nishan Sahibs have on them 2 'Kirpans' a 'Katar' and what could be a 'Chakar' or a shield - it could also be a 'degh' - as it has been argued that the Nishan Sahib is a representation of 'Degh Tegh Fateh'.

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a detail

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In this panel Guru Gobind Singh Singh is with 5 Singhs - the Nishan Sahib is plain with a border

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a detail

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In this panel we see the Beloved 'Char Sahibzadas' - here also the Nishan is plain with a border

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a detail

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(* taken from The Sikhs - T S Randhawa 2000)

In this painting of Guru Gobind Singh Ji , titled as 'Journey to Deccan', dated as circa AD 1770-80 painted in Rajastani style - we have an Akali Nihang holding a Yellow Nishan with a Kirpan Katar and Chakar/Dhal/Degh arrangement with a floral border.

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detail

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(* taken from Sikh Heritage - Dr Daljeet 2004)

In this portrait of Guru Gobind Singh from the 'Military Manual of Maharaja Ranjit Singh' ,dated around 1822-1830, kept in the Ram Bagh Museum Amritsar - we have a red and gold Nishan with what appears to be a 'Kard' on it.

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(* taken from Maharaja Ranjit Singh - Jean-Marie Lafont 2002)

In this portrait of Guru Gobind Singh we see a decorated red, gold and pink Nishan.

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Post Continues >>>>

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In this painting of The Char SahibZadas we have a decorated yellow Nishan Sahib .

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detail

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(*taken from Dr Daljeet 2004)

This is a detail from a late 19th century painting of Darbar Sahib - the twin Nishan Sahibs of Miri and Piri are shown - The colour is Kesri.

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(*taken from Dr Daljeet 2004)

In this Woodcut of Sri Amritsar - titled 'Naksha Darbar Sahib Sri Amritsar ji ka' and dated AD 1874 (sambat 1931) - we can clearly see the Miri Piri Nishan Sahibs and the Nishan Sahib on the roof terrace of the Darbar Sahib - the Nishan sahibs are again decorated with a Kirpan / Katar / chakar,degh,shield arrangement - the 'flag poles' are all topped with spear heads .

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Detail

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(* taken from Pirtan, Cultural Kosh - Chanan Singh Chan )

In this plan of Darbar Sahib , from the early 1900s, we can see two Nishan Sahibs - one on the roof of the Harimandir, the other to the left of the Akal Takht - both are of a yellow / kesri colour.

This plan from the Harry Mann Collection (Ontario, Canada) is fascinating because you can see all the Bungas around the parikarma the numerous trees and the original entrances .

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This address casket is on display at the Royal Ontario Museum - it belongs to the Royal Family and is in the form of a model of the Harimandir Sahib. It dates from the Late 1800s and was probably given to Queen Victoria. Note the Nishan Sahib is Kesri in colour and has a fringe and tassle. It is adorned with a Bhaugauti and a Chakar/Degh/shield symbol

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detail

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(* taken from The Arts of the Sikh Kingdoms - The Canadian Collections - Seema Bharadia - 2000)

The second Shahidi Jatha arriving at Jaito (1920s) - though the symbols are hard to see on the Nishan Sahibs - they are like the ones in the woodcut posted above - you can clearly make out a 'Katar'.

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Post Continues >>>>>

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detail

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(* taken from Warrior Saints - A S Madra P Singh 1999)

This photograph is of the Darshani Deori of Taran Taran Sahib - you can see the Nishan sahib is similar to the woodcut from 1874 AD , it has the kirpan / katar/ chakr pattern - the photograph comes from Khushwant Singh's book published in 1953

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(* taken from The Sikhs - Khushwant Singh - 1953)

These next pictures are of Battle Standards

The first is the famous 'Dussehra' painting of Ranjit Singh's Darbar by Schoefft - you can see the Red standard behind Lal Singh

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In this lithograph of Solykoff's painting of Sher Singh you can see the Battle Standards of Ranjit Singh - one with 'Karttikeya' on, the other I can't make out.

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In this last picture you can see the Sikh Battle Standards from the collection of Lord Dalhousie as they were displayed at the Mansion of Colstoun , East Lothian , Scotland.

Family tradition states that they were captured by Lord Gough at the Battle of Gujrat 21 February 1849.

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(* taken from Maharaja Ranjit singh - Mohinder Singh Rishi Singh Sondeep Shonkar - 2002)

GurFateh !

Ranjit Singh 'Freed'

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Gurfateh !

Here are two more examples

Sri Darbar Sahib circa 1840 (* from the Kapany Collection )

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Fresco from the walls of the Darbar Sahib , Amritsar (* from Sikh Architecture - P S Arshi - 1986)

Guru Gobind Singh Ji - the Nishan is both decorated and has 'Shasters' on it.

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Gurfateh

Ranjit Singh 'Freed'

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A lot of the paintings that were produced during the Ranjit Singh period were painted by Hindu artists from the Kangra region(see Paintings of the Sikhs by W.G Archer) who were paid by the Punjab court. They produced the artwork with often there own styles and would add illustrations from Hindu mythology where they felt.

As most Sikhs were not educated a lot of information about Sikhi was distorted e.g many Sikh texts were actually written by Brahmins (as they were the literate ones)and gradually Hindu practices crept into Sikhi. By the end of the Sikh Raj the Brahmin Dogras had such control on the Punjab that even Sati happened at Ranjit Singh's funeral.

The Sikh Guru Sahibs of course had banned these activities and condemned Brahmin superstitions and myths.

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A lot of Brahmin influence crept in during the time of the Mahants and Hindu caretakers eg:paintings,and frescos,if i saw those Shiva style flags now I would burn them to be honest and frank.

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Guest Dancing Warrior
A lot of Brahmin influence crept in during the time of the Mahants and Hindu caretakers eg:paintings,and frescos,if i saw those Shiva style flags now I would burn them to be honest and frank.

Your hate is phenomenal. I hope one day you can truly find peace within yourself. Freed ji as always thank you for your time and trouble.

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Banda Bahadurs armies were led into battle with a Nishaan Sahib with Hanumaan on it, was this also at the times of the Mahants and Hindu caretakers Sarpach? The tegha of Guru Hargobind Sahib which is kept by the Bidhi Chandis has Kaali standing over Shivji, im guessing Guru Hargobind must have been influenced by the Mahants? The old handwritten birs of Adi Guru Granth and Dasam Guru Granth have pictures of Kalika, Shiva, Adnarishwara, Chandi and all other Devi Devte on them, are these also the works of the Mahants and Hindus?

Your arson type mentality is great, havent you learnt anything else apart from how to use a lighter?

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Devi Worshop evils

http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/world/south_asia/6729927.stm

Slaves to the goddess of fertility

By Damian Grammaticas

BBC News, Bagalkot, southern India

Devadasis are 'sanctified prostitutes'

In a village in southern India a child has just been born. A group of women gather round the cradle, wishing the baby a life full of riches, rubies and pearls.

"You're lucky the child is a boy," the women tell the mother. In this society girls are valued far less.

The women are all devadasis, literally slaves of the goddess.

As children their parents gave them to serve Yellama - the goddess of fertility. Her cult is thousands of years old, her followers spread across southern India.

At the temple to Yellama in Saundatti women dance and praise the goddess.

The practice of dedicating young girls as devadasis has been outlawed for over 50 years, but still it happens.

Anti-slavery campaigners estimate that there are at least 25,000 devadasis in the state of Karnataka alone.

Sexual slavery

"Being devadasis means we are slaves of the goddess. We have to visit this temple. We wear necklaces of pearls to show we are bound to Yellama. We give blessings and perform her rituals," says Imla, a devadasi in her 40s who is swathed in a pink and yellow sari.

When girls dedicated to Yellama reach puberty they are forced to sacrifice their virginity to an older man. What follows is a life of sexual slavery, they become sanctified prostitutes.

The money devadasis earn goes straight to their parents who often act as pimps for their daughters.

Goddess Yellama's cult is thousands of years old

"My parents didn't have any sons, so there was nobody to earn the family a living," says Imla.

"Instead they turned me into a <admin-profanity filter activated>. I don't even remember when I started because I was so young. My parents thought at least they'd get some money from me."

Once girls are dedicated the course of their lives is decided. They can never marry, never have a family life.

In a town nearby we found Shoba who is just 20 and has been a devadasi prostitute for seven years.

Shoba showed me her brothel, a single room she shares with her parents.

She comes from a long line of devadasis. Her grandmother was one, her sister is too.

Shoba remembers how, when she was 13 her parents dressed her as if for marriage. They auctioned her virginity to the highest bidder.

Tough life

"When the first man arrived I thought he was going to marry me," Shoba recalls, "but he slept with me and then never came back. I realised this was now my trade. Every night I was sold to whoever paid the most."

Life here on the dry, harsh Deccan plateau has always been tough, especially for girls, who are often seen as a burden for poor families, expensive to marry off.

Recent years have been marked by droughts and crop failures.

Campaigners say there are 25,000 devadasis in Karnataka state alone

The goddess of fertility is seen as a powerful force. Many believe that giving girls to Yellama will bring good fortune on a family.

It also means they don't have to save for a dowry, and the daughter becomes a bread-winner.

We found Shoba's mother Satyavati tending to her field of sunflowers. Sacrificing their daughter's life has enriched Shoba's parents.

"Someone had to continue the tradition. It had to be my daughters," she shrugs.

"Because Shoba earns so much money she has been able to build us a house, and she bought these fields. So what's the big deal?"

Secret ceremonies

Despite campaigns by India's national and state governments, the system of devadasis endures.

The number of young girls being dedicated is declining. But now the ceremonies happen in secret, so it is impossible to know exact numbers.

I asked Shoba why she doesn't just give up being a devadasi, and leave it behind?

"I can't get out of the system, even if I say I'm not a devadasi any more nobody will come forward to marry me," she says.

"I keep telling other people not to make their daughters devadasis, you are abused, it's a horrible life."

So it's a life that Shoba will never escape from. Women already dedicated cannot be freed.

The power of belief is still so strong here that she will always be a devadasi, enslaved.

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Banda Bahadurs armies were led into battle with a Nishaan Sahib with Hanumaan on it, was this also at the times of the Mahants and Hindu caretakers Sarpach? The tegha of Guru Hargobind Sahib which is kept by the Bidhi Chandis has Kaali standing over Shivji, im guessing Guru Hargobind must have been influenced by the Mahants? The old handwritten birs of Adi Guru Granth and Dasam Guru Granth have pictures of Kalika, Shiva, Adnarishwara, Chandi and all other Devi Devte on them, are these also the works of the Mahants and Hindus?

Your arson type mentality is great, havent you learnt anything else apart from how to use a lighter?

Ek Onkar Satnam

Waheguru Ji Ka Khalsa Waheguru Ji Ki Fateh

Gurbar Akaal Ji

Guru Ji says

mY n gnysih ipRQm mnwaUN ] iksn ibsn kbhUM nh iDAwaUN ]

Mai 'N' ganays(i) pritham manaaoo(n)| kisan bisan kabhoo(n) neh dhiaaoo(n)

I do not praise or hail Ganesh before I start any task. (In old times, often Ganesh

would be hailed before starting any task). Nor do I let the thought of Vishnu or any

incarnations of Vishnu (i.e. Krishna) enter my mind. (Meaning Guru Gobind Singh Ji

never regarded Vishnu or any avatars as the supreme Lord; Akaal purakh, as he states next.)

kwn suny pihcwn n iqn so ] ilv lwgI morI pg ien so ]2]

Kaan sunay pahichaan 'N' thin so| liv laagee more pag in so

I know of their existence, but I do not ever worship them. May my prayers and

thoughts always be in the immaculate, holy feet of the Lord (the one and only).

I doubt it very much if Guru Gobind Singh Ji allowed Nishaan "the seal of the Khalsa " to hail hanumaan, before battle! Remember shastars and items were also given to the Gurus as gifts from hindus and muslims alike which did contain art work from their traditions i.e. swords from muslims containing arabic scripts.

Gurfateh Ji

"I have no name"

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Wow, did anyone notice how in the SECOND picture someone is doing CHAUR SAHIB to Kalgidhar Patshah... WOWWWWWWWWWW!!!! Further proof that Maharaj "aap Nirankar sigeh."

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    • the fed is lying to all of us https://www.peakprosperity.com/the-fed-is-lying-to-us/
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    • Just use this:
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