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Sikh Reference Library 1984


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What significant Sikh literature was lost when the sikh reference library was burnt and looted in 1984 by the Indian government

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Also have'nt many priceless items also gone missing. I think one item was something which can't have a financial value attached to it as it's priceless / can't be valued, donated by maharaja Ranjit Singh to Harmandir Sahib whcih was gifted to him by the Nizam of Hydrabad? Amongst other priceless artefacts and irreplacable transcripts, which are valued even more as they were written by our Gurus and other great Sikh personalities.

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is there any idea were the indian government took all these items???

Hate to think but logically thinking all written irreplacable manuscripts esp. of our Gurus were most probably destroyed to add insult to injury. Other valuables, who knows some senior ministers / army staff maybe made some cash by selling?

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Indian government did took many priceless treasure from darbar sahib.

SGPC filed case in high court few years ago and it was known news in media but however no news came out about the court decision.

Judge tossed case because army did manage to send *some* items and manuscripts back and all paperwork were signed by the sgpc officer claiming that they got the items back from army. Army produced that document in court and current sgpc was baffled and shocked to know that these sgpc officers took the item but never handed over the items. They quickly buried this under the carpet. This only means that those officers either sold it or kept it hiding. Signatures were of manjit Singh Calcutta and dilgeer.

It is known talk that dilgeer is holding some very old purataan manuscripts and few o his buddies are aware of that but what we need to know is that, how did he manage to get ahold of purataan bir?

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Without our own country, we don't have enough power or resources to get back our historic manuscripts and looted treasure including kohinoor diamond.

All thanks to wh McLeod who compiled the list of Sikh reference library and not many ppl were aware of that. Without the list we would be total clueless.

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enough power or resources to get back our historic manuscripts and looted treasure including kohinoor diamond.

Koh-i-noor no longer exists in the form it was taken from Punjab by the British. Also others also have as much claim to it as us, including the British. Why? Well because it was taken by force from many, originated in South India the mughals got it. Nadir Shah took it from Delhi, After his assaination his general Abdali got hold of it. It was Abdali's grandsons wife who promised it to Maharaja Ranjit Singh in lieu of payment for his help for resucing her husband from prison. It was gifted to Punjab by coersion as was the case with the handing over to the British.

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Without our own country, we don't have enough power or resources to get back our historic manuscripts and looted treasure including kohinoor diamond.

All thanks to wh McLeod who compiled the list of Sikh reference library and not many ppl were aware of that. Without the list we would be total clueless.

can we view the list?

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Koh-i-noor no longer exists in the form it was taken from Punjab by the British. Also others also have as much claim to it as us, including the British. Why? Well because it was taken by force from many, originated in South India the mughals got it. Nadir Shah took it from Delhi, After his assaination his general Abdali got hold of it. It was Abdali's grandsons wife who promised it to Maharaja Ranjit Singh in lieu of payment for his help for resucing her husband from prison. It was gifted to Punjab by coersion as was the case with the handing over to the British.

Excellent post Gurdsingh. Excellent. I'm glad for the first time in a long time a singh has talked liked a singh. I've been saying here a long time (to no avail) every time sikh groups (nearly all whom have little or no education) talk about wanting the koh-e-noor back....I've always said that we Sikhs should show the world how righteous we are by fighting to get it back for the pathans / afghans (leaving aside for the moment that it no longer exists and was cut up to make the present queen of canada and australia's tiara among other things). On sikh blog after sikh discussion forum each and every day you will always find sikhs talking about criminal somalis and pakistanis etc. But the fact is...we sikhs behaved proper gangster when it came to aquiring the koh-e-noor. We behaved liked thieving, tricking, sneaky gypsy thieves. As men and women of honour we should correct the mistakes of our forefathers. No matter where the pathan / afghans got it from and how they got it, the fact remains that we behaved no better than the common criminal to get it from them.As such, we should fight on their behalf to get, whats left of it,back for them.

As for the topic of the thread.....I too would like to know exactly what was stolen. Each and every antiquity should be known to the worldwide community. Each and every dirty filthy indian that has stolen and got rich on the proceeds of these thefts should and can be be hunted down by international law. But first......we....and everyone else, need to know what was stolen.

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Forget about kohinoor diamond but what about our land taken by British but never returned back which they were supposed to do. How about dogras who looted Khalsa Sarkar Treasury under the protection of British. If you read all treaties took place between sikhs and british after dismise of ranjit singh, you will see how cleverly they dismantled our long run and world's most liberal/equality run khalsa sarkar.

Here is one example of Treaty of Byrowal in December 1846.

By the terms of the Treaty of Byrowal in December 1846, a council of Regency (including Rani Jindan) was set up and a British resident and garrison imposed as a temporary measure until Dalip Singh came of age. At first sight the treaty seemed very generous, protecting the young Maharaja until his state could be handed over to him intact, although reduced in size. In reality the British began to dismantle the Sikh State.

Henry Lawrence, who ruled the Punjab as resident, was charmed by the boy and personally kind to him, organizing activities and magic lantern parties. However, the Maharaja’s first recorded political act enraged Lawrence. At the Annual festival Dussera in 1847 Dalip Singh publicly refused, despite British instructions, to mark Tej Singh as his commander-in-chief. Lawrence and Henry Hardinge, the governor general, were convinced, probably correctly, that Rani Jindan had put him up to it. Lawrence acted swiftly. He asked the young prince to ride with him late at night; it was impossible to refuse and when Dalip Singh asked to return to the palace, Lawrence told him that he was to spend the night in the Shalimar Gardens. The next he learnt that his mother had been seized in his absence and placed under house arrest, and that he was forbidden to have any contact with her. Both other and son were devastated, Rani writing to Lawrence:

"Restore my son to me, I cannot bear the pain of separation - my son is very young. He is incapable of doing anything. I have left the kingdom. I have no need of a kingdom - there is no one with my son. He has no sister, no brother. He has no uncle, junior or senior. His father he has lost. To whose care has he been entrusted?"

Although it is possible to conclude that the governor-general and Henry Lawrence, as well as his successor, his brother John Lawrence took the Treaty of Byrowal seriously but it is clear that Rani Jindan felt that they had no intension of upholding it. In desperation she wrote, 'why do you take possession of the kingdom by underhand means? Why do you not do it openly? On the one hand you make a show of friendship and on the other hand you have put us in prison. Do justice to me or I shall appeal to the London Headquarters.'

read more here: http://www.searchsik....com/dalip.html

Does not matter about kohinoor but the way british looted punjab and supported dogras to take away major part of punjab (kashmir/himachal) and then when they suppose to hand over Sikh land to sikhs but made haste decision of dividing punjab and pakistan and create civil war which results in death of more than a million and millions displaced.. That is the reality !

sorry for going off-topic

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Guest KopSingh

Koh-i-noor no longer exists in the form it was taken from Punjab by the British. Also others also have as much claim to it as us, including the British. Why? Well because it was taken by force from many, originated in South India the mughals got it. Nadir Shah took it from Delhi, After his assaination his general Abdali got hold of it. It was Abdali's grandsons wife who promised it to Maharaja Ranjit Singh in lieu of payment for his help for resucing her husband from prison. It was gifted to Punjab by coersion as was the case with the handing over to the British.

brilliant stuff, wicked post

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getting back to the library - i heard it is intact but with the indian governement - they stole all the libraray - why??

because they can change all the hukhamnamas and old referencees and then give it back to us after about 50 odd years when all the

panthic singhs are wiped out - and so we are more alighned as sanatan matt - hindu sikhs .

i recall i think Maskeen jee mentioning this above

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