Jump to content

Recommended Posts

no but i have sikh friends which have, one was a trim singh the rest moneh, so i don't know where you fit in with that, i think a lot of people go on it to 'have a good time' because you share rooms don't you, you can only have your own room in the last 6 months and that's if you work as the person in charge of the flat. I don't know if you would find it appropriate if you are a amritdhari or practicing sikh, depends on your personality? I don't think you will have problems from new yorkers, becase you will be on the busy commuting routes etc, and after what happened in Wisconsin they should be aware that you are a sikh and not a muslim?

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
  • Replies 41
  • Created
  • Last Reply

Top Posters In This Topic

Top Posters In This Topic

Popular Posts

Hopefully someone from new york can comment on this particular issue. But if it was me i would be gone in a second, never scared of anything like that love the challenge! at the end of the day most o

Kalsingh, when someone asks you your religion, do you say your a Sikh? Because then your personal reasons become wider as people get their impression of religions based on the people they meet, people

I am thinking about going to New York for this work experience programme. I am from London. I have been thinking about it for years but I have been putting it off due to the feeling/concern/fear tha

learningkaur, yeah you do share rooms. I am not an amritdhari, I'm a keshdhari. Don't read bani on a regular basis/don't get up for amrivela. I don't drink but I am an open and adventurous type of personality. I'm sure I would find things to do even if everyone else is going off on a binge drinking session! Which I don't think many will really do (not on a regular anyway) as it is more professional than say living out at uni (because here you are working in a professional environment rather than studying). I have a friend (non sikh) who has been too. He had a blast.

Don't know about the last part (aware I am a Sikh and not a Muslim) as I will not be wearing a turban. I will have my hair tied up at the back of my head and have a long beard. Don't know what they will think, lol. But yeah, seeing from the reponses in terms of how visible Sikhs are treated etc, that has enlightened me a bit. However, I will probably get more looks or whatever than 'visible' Sikhs because of my unique hairstyle.

You'll be fine singh just control your anger remember woooo sahhhh

Lol, cool. I'll try my level best if I go

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

Staten Island isn't dangerous. It's mostly middle-class. Some bad parts, but mostly okay. I lived in Harlem for about a year. People think that's a bad area, but those people were friendlier than the goreh downtown. Overall, most people don't bother you, unless you go looking for trouble. Now people go out of their way to talk to you.

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

Staten Island isn't dangerous. It's mostly middle-class. Some bad parts, but mostly okay. I lived in Harlem for about a year. People think that's a bad area, but those people where friendlier than the goreh downtown. Overall, most people don't bother you, unless you go looking for trouble. Now people go out of their way to talk to you.

eh its easy to get lost and whatnot, one wrong turn and you could end up where you shouldn't be. And the neighborhoods are all mixed together. I would avoid it if I was visiting with little knowledge of the city, but thats just me

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

Staten Island isn't dangerous. It's mostly middle-class. Some bad parts, but mostly okay. I lived in Harlem for about a year. People think that's a bad area, but those people were friendlier than the goreh downtown. Overall, most people don't bother you, unless you go looking for trouble. Now people go out of their way to talk to you.

People stopped to talk to you after Wisconsin?

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

Yeah bro. It's like they feel bad for what happened in Wisconsin. I was out of the country when that happened, and when I came back it was a whole different vibe. People come up to me and say hello, good morning, or just start a random conversation. That never happened before.

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

Put a dastar on your head or I’ll find you in NYC and attack you verbally and physically. Don’t worry I’ll give you hugs before and after, feed you, and get you stitched up and become your best friend also. Those who give you the clichéd “accept you for who you are”…don’t have a clue what a beautiful person you are.

Right now bro, despite having no style, you may be a better human than me and I’ll respect you for that. However, you are not a keshdhari Sikh when you walk around in public without a dastar. Please don’t tell people that. It is insulting to the legacy of our Guruji’s and such presence in public is confusing and damaging to the psyche of younger Sikhs. Would you walk down the street slapping yourself in the face and say ‘I have my personal reasons’?

Had to get that out of the way to restore forum decorum with the dastar properly respected. You are more likely to get an odd look or comment from a European tourist in Manhattan than a local. Many locals will be sincerely friendly. Many will hate you quietly and be friendly. Keep an eye out for those and find ways to push their buttons. Very few will bother you. Nonetheless, it may help to walk fearlessly, ie. with dastar, and know how to diffuse situations and try to save the courage for fights that are much tougher than those on a sidewalk.

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

buddasingh, I was waiting for someone like you to come along and mess up this thread. Ok, fine maybe I shouldn't call myself a keshdhari sikh (but I was only doing so in this case to give a depiction to one of the posters of who or more precisely, what I look like, in terms of if I'm a moneh, which I'm not, or if I dont' cut my hair). But then, maybe you should be telling all the pug wale around, and to be honest even some amritdharis that they cannot call themselves keshdharis and amridharis as by the fourth masters definition himself, one who calls himself a sikh shall rise in the ambrosial hours, have a bath and meditate on the name. I know you know half of the so called singhs don't even do that, so go tell them to stop calling them sikhs too.

I couldn't really give two hoots about how I come across (looks wise) and if I end up confusing some already confused sikhs. I live for myself, what I'm content with. I don't live to please others. I am not a gursikh by far (one of the reasons I don't wear a dastar). But I respect and see the power in kesh, hence why I don't cut it. Why can't people like you just accept and leave it at that?

'Would you walk down the street slapping yourself in the face and say ‘I have my personal reasons’?'

What is this supposed to mean. Don't judge me mate, just don't go judging me.

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

And here’s the interesting part Kalsingh. My comments are not about you or me. They are about Guru Gobind Singh Ji’s beauty with a distinct identity that we both claim to cherish.

My words are not easy to swallow and you’ve handled them with relative grace. You are right about ‘pug wale’ and amritdhari’s. You have grace. You should lecture people like me. You are not giving yourself enough credit by following through to be yourself and embracing your identity.

“I have my personal reasons” ….is in reference to your comment earlier on.

Bro, the thread is on a Sikh forum. It got a bit “messed up” at the point keshdhari Sikh was associated with knocking the dastar off one’s own head. Who needs bollywood to mock us, when we mock ourselves? Who needs the white supremacists to scare us, when we are too scared to be ourselves?

This is not about you or me. This is about standing up for Sikhi. You talk about pungas bro? Sometimes it feels like I fight the world every waking hour as part of a uniform, it’s not pretty, yet I live for it and make it beautiful. The enemy’s blows are sweet.

But when your own bros and sis, the “sikh” majority shout their brotherly love as clean-shaven, trimmed etc. while promoting varied cartoon caricatures of our Guruji’s identity it’s like getting stabbed in the back… because I refuse to see those bros and sis as an enemy.

Are you being judgmental by suggesting I’m judging? In fact you are part of the vast majority when it comes to Sikh identity confusion. By mathematical definition, I claim to be judged.

I can’t possibly know you just like I can’t possibly know the beauty inside a single soldier in an army that is fighting against me. However, if that soldier is pointing a gun at my Guruji’s Sikh identity, speaking up is not about judgment, it is about dignity. And if that soldier is also full of love like you, it’s about lots of tough love in return bro.

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

Bro, the thread is on a Sikh forum. It got a bit “messed up” at the point keshdhari Sikh was associated with knocking the dastar off one’s own head. Who needs bollywood to mock us, when we mock ourselves? Who needs the white supremacists to scare us, when we are too scared to be ourselves?

Errm, and me not wearing a dastar is somehow mocking Sikhs and mocking myself? Lol, nah mate.

This is not about you or me. This is about standing up for Sikhi. You talk about pungas bro? Sometimes it feels like I fight the world every waking hour as part of a uniform, it’s not pretty, yet I live for it and make it beautiful. The enemy’s blows are sweet.

Mate, even you said I am not a Sikh, and you are probably right (in terms of the truest definition). So why should I stand up for Sikhi, it is not my war . Not yet anyway. I've got my own war/s going on at the moment, and believe me they are strong. (On a sidenote I would still probably end up knocking someone out though if I saw a singh being harrassed)

Are you being judgmental by suggesting I’m judging? In fact you are part of the vast majority when it comes to Sikh identity confusion. By mathematical definition, I claim to be judged.

I felt like you were judging me my friend, maybe you weren’t. But to say someone is judging someone when they think they are being judge is not judging that person in the same negative way (the same negative way they thought they were being judged).

I can’t possibly know you just like I can’t possibly know the beauty inside a single soldier in an army that is fighting against me. However, if that soldier is pointing a gun at my Guruji’s Sikh identity, speaking up is not about judgment, it is about dignity. And if that soldier is also full of love like you, it’s about lots of tough love in return bro.

How on earth is anyone here (me or other posters) pointing a gun at the pugri man, I don’t get it. I actually used to wear one, still do occasionally, to the gurdwara and all. You’ve taken this as an insult on Guru Jis identity. Why? Who the hell am I? I’m just a nobody who is not comfortable (many reasons, some even physical, there you go, you’re making me reveal things I didn’t want to) in wearing a dastar at this point in time. That doesn’t mean I am knocking it. In fact it’s the contrary, I don’t feel I can do it justice. It is the guise of a saint, and I am no saint (only one of many reasons again).

All the confusion of Sikh Identiy you talk about, the moneh are doing the most damage (from your point of view, even though my opinions differ) than anyone else. At least I keep my kesh. Its better than cutting it, is it not?

I am not making excuses for not wearing a dastar. It is my own shortcomings (on the whole) that do not allow me to wear it. A dastar on my head is the ultimate place I want to reach in the future, but at the moment, I am finding it very hard. Just let that be. I am not claiming to be better by not wearing one.

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

Mate, even you said I am not a Sikh, and you are probably right (in terms of the truest definition). So why should I stand up for Sikhi, it is not my war . Not yet anyway.

No where in the above post does the poster say you are not sikh! Why should you stand up for sikhi? why are you even on this forum. You want help from your brothers and sisters and then come out with that.

p.s when its your war let us know so we can chip in when your bothered!

p.p.s whenever people say im battling other stuff/wars etc makes me think that although we are all in different circumstances the majority of us cant complain especially when there are singhs/singhnia rotting in jails, african children starving etc makes our wars seem pretty small

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

No where in the above post does the poster say you are not sikh! Why should you stand up for sikhi? why are you even on this forum. You want help from your brothers and sisters and then come out with that.

p.s when its your war let us know so we can chip in when your bothered!

p.p.s whenever people say im battling other stuff/wars etc makes me think that although we are all in different circumstances the majority of us cant complain especially when there are singhs/singhnia rotting in jails, african children starving etc makes our wars seem pretty small

Well he kind of implied that when he said I can't call myself a keshdhari sikh. Anyway, I was trying to make a point, maybe I should have worded it differently, don't take it too literally (as I did say I'd batter someone if they harrassed a singh). He's basically saying wear the dastar, yeah its a war and that but fight for it and all that. What I'm saying is, I'm not going to fight a war (inside myself) only for the sake of wearing a pug. That will be a side effect that I will have to do. When I want to wear a pug, intrinsically (not just so that I can fight for it) then I will naturally fight for it anyway. I shoudn't have said why should I fight for sikhi (as I do, in terms of everything, I will debate, have wars of words and even physically fight). I should have said something along the lines of why should I fight for wearing a turban (fight for myself) just for the sake of wearing a turban. I will fight for others. And I will fight for myself once I wear it not just so that I can fight to wear it.

In regards to your comment about we can't complain etc and all of that, these sorts of comments are ignorant, easy to make and have started to annoy me recently. You gotta remember everything is relative. An analogy is about council estate people in the UK. People say that they have it much better than people in Africa/India which is true and therefore have nothing to complain about. But that doesn't mean they don't have it bad. I used to think like how you're thinking, but it is not black and white. People from council estates 'compared' to richer people in the UK can have it really bad and be disadvantaged. It's how they are bought up, and what they are bought up around, that causes struggles. They are told you gotta have the latest trainers, the latest phones, through media and peers at school etc. This goes deep into the psyche from a young age. On the other hand, put a poor child from Africa/India into one of these estates and he'll be in heaven, all he will be happy enought with the food and shelter alone. But make him grow up there for a few years and you will see him start struggling and wanting due to societal pressures. You gotta look at countrys and overall (for other subjects, like mine and 'my war') on a case by case basis. Its easy to start comparing things/people/situations on a global scale and dilute the seriousness of each due to not looking at the struggles individually.

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...

  • advertisement_alt
  • advertisement_alt
  • advertisement_alt


  • Topics

  • Posts

    • If we look at Sikh Rehat 2 things should be noted. First, no alcohol allowed. Second, 4 kakkar are not allowed to leave the body, even for a second!  Let's just say the Gurus decided and gave a figure. We're allowed to consume half a glass (e.g. 250ml) of beer once a week, containing no more than 5% in alc volume. And four kakkars, let's assume Dasah Patsha stated "Four can be parted from you at a distance of 1.5 meters."  Now today, we can guess why the measurement are absolute zero. The rehat states ZERO TOLERANCE! The alcohol consumption would have been edited to "5 glass per seven days it's ok to get tipsy, Thas what Maharaj is saying" and departure from kakkar would have been "150 yards..." We Sikhs EASILY would have fooled and edited measurements!!!  The Gurus knew this. Today our actions are evidence to my opinion. So the Guru has certainly not given us any unit of measurement as we're unworthy of it. 
    • I understand your concern, kada being displayed. Kada should have not been displayed at all.  As for the music, a UK muslim bringing back traditional style instruments in punjabi music? Now thas a big wow! (Ok, maybe not lyrics but all lyrics do head towards lusting anyways) so I stopped listening to all songs long ago. 
    • Former Cong. MP charged with murder in 1984 anti-Sikh riots - The Hindu Former Cong. MP charged with murder in 1984 anti-Sikh riots   NEW DELHI: , DECEMBER 07, 2021 22:27 IST UPDATED: DECEMBER 08, 2021 04:08 IS Noting that an unlawful assembly or a mob of several thousand persons armed with deadly weapons like dandas (sticks) and iron rods was present at the spot with the common object of resorting to large-scale looting, arson and destruction of the property of Sikhs, a Delhi court has framed charges of murder against former Congress MP Sajjan Kumar in connection with the death of a father-son duo during the 1984 anti-Sikh riots. The order was passed by Special Judge M.K. Nagpal, who framed charges against Kumar under provisions for murder, attempt to culpable homicide, and rioting, among others. The deceased were identified as Jaswant Singh and Tarun Deep Singh. The court, however, dropped the charges under attempt to murder and destruction of evidence. According to the family of the deceased, a mob led by Kumar burnt the two men alive, and also set their house on fire, on November 1, 1984. Kumar is already lodged in jail after he was convicted in another murder case pertaining to the 1984 riots. The judge noted that there was sufficient evidence to show that Kumar was not only a participant in the mob which killed the deceased persons and set their house on fire, but was also leading it. The court noted that its view regarding Kumar’s participation in the mob was much stronger, and the allegations, along with the material, gave rise to “grave suspicion”.  
    • Experts Say Sikh Leadership Must Oppose Atrocities Against Muslims | NewsClick   Experts Say Sikh Leadership Must Oppose Atrocities Against Muslims Punjab civil society and organisations are very outspoken against the persecution of Muslims, but the Sikh political and religious leaders can do much more. Jasvinder Sidhu   08 Dec 2021   Recently, a gurudwara association in Gurugram, Haryana, opened its doors to Muslims who had bands of Hindu groups harassing them and protesting their offering namaz even at designated spaces. This gesture of brotherhood was welcomed from far and wide, yet it also raised some questions for the Sikh religious and political leadership.  Many Sikh historians feel the marginalisation of Muslims across north India since the Modi government came to power should not be allowed to pass unchallenged. They say the leadership of a community labelled a “protector” should break its silence on atrocities against any minority community. They also say that while Punjabi civil society has kept raising its voice against the targeting of Muslims by Hindu fundamentalists, it is time community leaders also raise their voice for Muslims and against their mistreatment. “This [mistreatment of Muslims] should not be tolerated; they are citizens of India,” says Dr Joginder Singh, head of the Sikh History and Research Center, Khalsa College Amritsar. “It is not just about Muslims. Sikhism teaches us to fight injustice and this struggle is part of our history. Our gurus sacrificed their lives and families for justice,” he adds. According to the message of Guru Nanak Dev, if there is injustice, Sikhs must raise their voice against it. “The exact words are, ‘Nanak naam chardi kala tere bhane sarbat da bhala—which means ‘blessings and peace for everyone’,” says Joginder Singh.  In August 2019, BJP leaders started making offensive remarks about Kashmiri women in public after the abrogation of Article 370 of the Constitution in Jammu and Kashmir. Soon after, Giani Harpreet Singh, the Jathedar or head of the Akal Takht, the top decision-making body of the Sikhs, issued a powerful condemnatory statement. He said, “Kashmiri women are part of our society. It is our religious duty to defend their honour. Sikhs should protect their honour for the sake of duty and history.” The statement of the Akal Takht had such a strong impact that no BJP leader uttered a single word about Kashmiri women after it. The holy book of the Sikhs, the Guru Granth Sahib, has many hymns and shabads such as ‘Shora so pehchaniy joh lade deen ke het—he alone is brave who fights for the underprivileged/helpless.’ Such lines are crystal clear about the duty of Sikhs toward others. It is another reason why historians feel the religious and socio-political heads of the Sikh community must urgently speak out for Muslims anywhere in the country. “I think the influence of the Jathedar of the Akal Takht is very crucial and his intervention necessary. But unfortunately, this institution has been marginalised because of the political functioning of the Akali Dal and the Shiromani Gurdwara Parbandhak Committee,” feels Dr Joginder Singh. “Yet, if Jathedar Gyani Harjeet Singh acts independently in this regard, it could bring some relief for the Muslim community, which would be most welcome and desirable,” he adds. Experts also point out that Punjabi civil society and groups have regularly opposed the targeting of Muslims by Hindu fundamentalists. “It is not that the Sikhs are not speaking on this issue [of ill-treatment of Muslims],” says Harjeshwer Pal Singh, professor of history at the Guru Govind Singh College, Chandigarh. He adds, “Civil society in Punjab is very vocal about it.” He points out that Punjabis participated in the anti-Citizenship Amendment Act (CAA) protests in Delhi and that by and large, the Punjabi Sikh community has stood with Muslims. “But I feel the Sikh religious institutions should speak out for their fellow minority too. Still, we cannot call it a failure of the Sikh community on this issue,” he says. There are still expectations that the Sikh political and religious leaders would also break their silence, just like individuals and civil society have. The view is that the Sikhs must oppose the creation of a situation that they had to confront during the eighties due to the same people and police.  Another perception about Sikhs is that they are silent because of past atrocities by Mughals and execution of Sikh gurus in particular. It is a perception avidly propagated by the Hindu right-wing forces. However, experts demolish this argument with solid historical references. “The atrocities of the Mughals against the Sikhs are not an issue at all,” argues Sarabjinder Singh, Director, Jagatpur Baba Center for Interfaith Harmony, Patiala. “In Sikh history, two Muslim brothers, Gani Khan and Nabi Khan helped Guru Govind Singh ji escape from the siege of the Mughals in Machiwara, Punjab. Sikhism is always against cruel, merciless regimes. Then, Mughals were the ‘zalim’ [oppressor]. If any other community was doing the same things, the guru surely would have fought them.” There are a number of historical events wherein the Muslims fought for the Sikhs, even sacrificing their lives. After Guru Teg Bahadur was martyred along with Bhai Sati Das, Bhai Mati Das, and Bhai Dayala Das at Delhi’s Chandni Chowk, Abdulla Khawaja, keeper of the jail at Chandni Chowk Kotwali in Delhi revolted against the Mughals. He was the first person to reach Anandpur Sahib with information about the executions. Sikh gurus were executed, but other gurus did not cease interacting with Muslims and continued business with Mughal rulers. This did not change in the 18th century, when the Sikh rulers were in power. For example, most Sikh rulers in the Malwa region issued coins in the name of the Afghan king Ahmad Shah Abdali. “It is a wrong notion that there was a consistent conflict between the Sikhs and Muslims,” says Dr Joginder Singh. “You can also take the example of Pir Buddhu Shah. He fought on behalf of Guru Govind Singh ji. So, there are number of instances in the Sikh History where Muslims fought for Sikhs.” Even the composition of the Khalsa army led by Banda Bahadur Singh in the 18th century was substantially Muslim. “My perception is that the Sikh leadership missed a chance when the special clause of the Constitution for Kashmiris was withdrawn by this government,” feels Dr Joginder Singh. “Sikh leaders should have sent a message to the minority community. They think they have a good reputation with Delhi, so they are safe, but nobody is safe.”  “Look at how the government and media labelled the farmers protesting against the three farm laws as Khalistani and separatist,” he concludes. The author is a freelance investigative journalist. The views are personal.
    • Well you can't knock anyone out apparently. Lol. 
×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

Terms of Use