Jump to content

40 Sikhs Convert To Christianity In Tarn Taran District


Recommended Posts

http://www.sikh24.com/2012/08/40-sikhs-convert-to-christianity-in-a-tarn-taran-district-village

Sooner we realize no one is out to help our Panth in Punjab, the better. Sant Samaj is no different, they're all whipped and can't make any difference in Punjab. It's Badal and indian government's way to hush up Sangat abroad and give us fake knights in armor promising to protect the kingdom.

Punjab | August 21, 2012, 5:50 pm

BREAKING: 40 Sikhs Convert to Christianity in a Tarn Taran District Village

Gurdwara Management's Treatment of "Low Caste" Sikhs Calls for Strict Action

By: Sikh24 Editors

Gurdwara-Baba-Bir-Singh-in-village-Dhotian-district-Tarn-Taran.jpg

Gurdwara Baba Bir Singh in village Dhotian, district Tarn Taran

AMRITSAR SAHIB (August 21, 2012)–According to sources, today at approximately 3:30pm (India time), 40 Sikhs have converted to Christianity in the village Dhotian (ਢੌਟੀਆਂ) in district Tarn Taran. There are 31 Gurdwaras in the village and one historical shrine, Gurdwara Raja Ram in memory of Baba Bir Singh Naurangabad. Langar is served in the village’s large Gurdwara, but the Mahzbi Sikhs, or so-called “low castes,” are refused entry–contrary to the tenants of the Sikh faith.

Baba_Jagtar_Singh_Tarn_Taran_Kar_Seva.jpg

Baba Jagtar Singh, Kar Sewa Wale

For the past few years, Baba Jagtar Singh of Tarn Taran Sahib has been doing ‘Kar Sewa’ (construction service). They have demolished the historical Gurdwara and rebuilt it in the name of sewa. Millions of rupees have been spent on the construction of a Gate and Langar Hall in which the so-called low castes are not allowed entry. Baba Jagtar Singh and the rest of his sewadars (volunteers) have been witnessed talking down to the so-called low caste Sikhs.

This was the first missionary tour by the Christians in the village, which has led to 40 conversions of Sikhs who originate from the so-called low caste backgrounds. It is likely in the next missionary tour they will construct a church in the village.

It is noteworthy that this is the village of the writer Jagjit Singh who authored the book ‘Sikh Inqalaab’ (Sikh Revolution) in which he strongly condemned the caste system and caste discrimination, in line with the Sikh faith. Since the time of the early Sikh Gurus, this village has been on the forefront for giving sacrifices for the Sikh religion and maintaining the Sikh religion.

One of the leaders of the local Sikh youth who have been fighting the so-called “Kar Sewa Sant” (Jagtar Singh) and caste discrimination said, “If the Christians make a church then they will invest 50,000 rupees because they want the poor Sikhs (from the lower social backgrounds) to join them and give them equal status.”

One group of Christian missionaries is very active on the banks of the River Beas in the village Dhahian. The ‘Mahzbi’ Sikhs in the villages where great Sikh freedom fighters hailed from like Shaheed Bhai Manochahal, Sangha, Naushira, Vein Poin, Nagoke, Sakheera and others are being groomed and converting to Christianity in large numbers. Churches are being constructed in which they are getting children to sing the praises of Jesus on loud speakers so that all the villagers can hear.

Sikh groups are asking Akal Takht Sahib to take strict action against the Saadh Jagtar Singh and his men who are not only demolishing historical Gurdwaras in the name of ‘Kar Sewa’ but committing a grave sin in the garb of Sikhs by pushing the poor and Mahzbi Sikhs away from the Sikh religion.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Terrible...its about time everytone gets involved in some form of parchaar when they are in punjab...no point going there and sitting in the pind..need western well knowledged gursikhs going over and bringing sikhi to the masses...

there is no high and low caste in the sikh panth..there is only one caste and that is kshatri khalsa...no distinction within the khalsa at all...all are equal...these punjabi pendus are dragging sikhi in the mud

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

the caste system is engrained in the indian people and culture to such an extent that its nearly irreversible..even muslims and christians practice caste system in india regardless of what they tell you....the only way this will change is when people accept khalsa as their jaat...caste system itself was not a problem when it was optional and you could move between jaat...but now its become hereditary and a hierarchy was established which has made it opressive and corrupt...the only way to break hereditary allegiance to jaat is by inter-marrying between sikhs

Link to post
Share on other sites

Caste is a big thing, but a bigger is that our community refuses to allocate the proper money to funnel them into support in pinds.

Everything's a mess. All the money that the SGPC gets goes into their pockets - shareyaam. Avtar Makkari flat out admits it on camera 2 crores kharcha is "just on his fuel cost".

It's sad to say, but Punjab is a horrible place now, everyone is blinded by panj chore.

Link to post
Share on other sites

the caste system is engrained in the indian people and culture to such an extent that its nearly irreversible..even muslims and christians practice caste system in india regardless of what they tell you....the only way this will change is when people accept khalsa as their jaat...caste system itself was not a problem when it was optional and you could move between jaat...but now its become hereditary and a hierarchy was established which has made it opressive and corrupt...the only way to break hereditary allegiance to jaat is by inter-marrying between sikhs

bro u right it bein irreversible, coz pakistanis still belive in it, jus as much as ppl in india n panjab. look @ the sullayy in england, these rajahs/gujjars/jatts/qureshis never inter-marry.

btw mods can u delet my thread on this exact article. even tho i opened it first, before this thread, ppl have commented on this thread more, cheers

Link to post
Share on other sites

bro u right it bein irreversible, coz pakistanis still belive in it, jus as much as ppl in india n panjab. look @ the sullayy in england, these rajahs/gujjars/jatts/qureshis never inter-marry.

btw mods can u delet my thread on this exact article. even tho i opened it first, before this thread, ppl have commented on this thread more, cheers

Sorry, I did not see your thread.

Related:

Link to post
Share on other sites

Sorry, I did not see your thread.

no problem bro, no need 2 say sorry its kool singh. btw yea ive seen the vid b4, sad, that ppl give up their sardari n even amritdharis give it up for another faith, coz of poverty. How is it that gurdwaras wont let certain types of ppl in? the openess/oneness is wat made sikhi the fastest growin religion in british panjab, with most converts, n now all the hardwork n effort dun by sikh missionaries/parcharaks/sant of the 1900's-1940s is goin down the drain.

this guys grandparents or their grandparents were prolly in the exact same situation as hindus or muslims who were bein bullied by their "own ppl" n barred from mandirs/masjids, n then accepted sikhi 2 improve themselves. n aint it an irony, the so-called same ppl of that all inclusive faith r doin the same thing now as those hindus/muslims, gandh!!

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

Caste is a big thing, but a bigger is that our community refuses to allocate the proper money to funnel them into support in pinds.

Everything's a mess. All the money that the SGPC gets goes into their pockets - shareyaam. Avtar Makkari flat out admits it on camera 2 crores kharcha is "just on his fuel cost".

It's sad to say, but Punjab is a horrible place now, everyone is blinded by panj chore.

Future of Sikhi is outside of India

Link to post
Share on other sites

Like it or not, we certainly do have a caste problem. Although everyone does it to some extent but Jats seem to do it the most. I can see a non Amritdhari practicing caste discrimination, but I can never understand how and why Amritdharis practice caste based discrimination. This is the worst type of practice equal in my opinion to the 4 krahits. Maharaj Sumath Bakshan Sikh Kaum noon because the Sikh kaum is doing so many things against Gurmat.

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

Bigotry alive for Christian Dalits

By Sunil Raman

BBC News, Eraiyur 999999.gif

_45887672_main_parish_church.jpg

The village came up around the parish church, Lady of the Rosary Parish

Centuries ago, as their forefathers faced social and economic deprivation, many low-caste Hindus embraced Christianity.

But in one corner of southern India, their hopes for equality remain unfulfilled hundreds of years on. Called "pariahs", hundreds of Dalit Christians continue to face discrimination - not from Hindus but fellow Christians.

More than 200km (124 miles) from Chennai, the capital of the southern state of Tamil Nadu, is the village of Eraiyur.

Home to about 3,000 Dalit Christians, mostly farm labourers and migrant workers, the area witnessed violence last year when Dalits demanded equal treatment.

The village is dominated by Vanniyar Christians numbering 15,000, who own most of the land and businesses.

They imposed restrictions on Dalits even though they had also converted to Christianity.

Restricted life

A 17th Century church building, Lady of the Rosary Parish, stands tall above the Eraiyur settlement. The village came up around the parish church, with Vanniyar houses closest to it. The Dalits were forced to build their small huts on the fringe of the village.

It did not take long for the divisions within the Hindu social system to be reflected among the new Christians.

The dominant Vanniyars created rules which restricted the movement of the Dalits.

o.gif

_45887706_pereiyamaka.jpg

start_quote_rb.gifWe were told not to touch any upper caste person, not to get too close to them, not to talk to themend_quote_rb.gif

Mrs Peraiyamakar

When they visited the parish church they were not allowed to walk on the main street leading to the building. Instead they had to use a side street that led to the church gate.

When Dalits died they were not allowed to be buried in the cemetery. Their burial ground is beyond the village and can only be accessed through a broken path.

In addition, the funeral cart parked inside the church building can be used only by Vanniyars.

"We were told not to touch any upper caste person, not to get too close to them, not to talk to them," says Mrs Peraiyamaka, 60, a farm labourer who has been visiting the parish church since childhood.

"It is no different now."

Mr Thomas, a 60-year-old labourer says there is also a fear of violence as young Dalits refuse to be submitted to such humiliation.

He says this fear prompted the Dalits to build an alternative church.

A single-room, white-washed brick structure with an iron grill for the entrance is set in a small open ground.

Called Our Lady of Perpetual Help, the Dalit church has a coloured icon of Virgin Mary with Baby Jesus in her arms. She is flanked by plastic flowers and incense sticks burn on the sides.

The Dalits' demands of recognition for their church were rejected by local Catholic priests on the ground that a village can have only one parish church.

{C} o.gif

start_quote_rb.gifThere is no big change after we came to Christianity. We have very good Christian names, we read Bible and got to Church instead of temples.end_quote_rb.gif

Mr Mathew, Dalit activist {C}

Mr Mathew is a Dalit activist who graduated from Madras University.

Having faced prejudice as a schoolboy, he has now decided to fight for the rights of Dalits.

His efforts to seek justice have created tension in his village, forcing him to move to elsewhere.

He is angry that although the constitution has banned "untouchability" it continues to be practised in different ways.

"My family may get some minimum help or guidance from Christianity. That's all. There is no big change after we came to Christianity," says Mr Mathew.

Vanniyars disgruntled

{C}

_45887670_dalit_church.jpg

Dalits are demanding that their church be recognised {C}

As we walked out of the Dalit quarters towards the well laid-out area where Vanniyar Christians live under the shadow of the whitewashed parish church, we were greeted by a few angry women.

They did not want us to take pictures and asked us to leave.

A few angry residents of Vanniyar quarters gathered around us. They agreed to answer our questions. Emily, 25, was eager to give their version of the story.

"We have allowed them to use the road. They are creating trouble," she says.

We asked her how in a free country one group could dictate to others on the use of a public road.

"I don't know. It's been like this… but we have now allowed them," Emily replied.

Similar responses came from other Vanniyars we spoke to.

Mr Arukadas, a retired government teacher lives next to the parish church and he shared his unhappiness with the Dalit Christians.

Asked about using a common funeral van and a graveyard where all Christians irrespective of their past Hindu caste identity can be buried, he retorted: "It will take a long time for a common graveyard."

Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...
  • advertisement_alt
  • advertisement_alt
  • advertisement_alt


×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

Terms of Use