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No nihangs were before Khalsa... Unless they were niddar nangs ancestors!! Something niddar would say... With the Khalsa came sant sipahi miriyada and hence nihungs

yes there were nihangs created by patshahi 6vi .

Guru Hargobind Ji were who gave the order to be sant sipahi and introduced Miri and piri

and they all wore farla - i.e Budha dal which is the oldest Nihang Faction

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yes there were nihangs created by patshahi 6vi .

Guru Hargobind Ji were who gave the order to be sant sipahi and introduced Miri and piri

and they all wore farla - i.e Budha dal which is the oldest Nihang Faction

I think what Cisco Singh is saying is that there were Nihangs before our gurus.

Please don't kill me if I'm wrong.

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nihangs predate Khalsa, originally the soldiers of the akal sena founded By Guru Hargobind Ji were known as akalis, later called nihangs of Buddha Dal as Baba Buddha was in charge of akal sena while Guru Hargobind ji was imprisoned.

There's also writings in Dasam Granth by Sri Guru Gobind Singh ji maharaj that speaks of Nihangs on the battlefield in the mythical battle between durga/chandi and the demon's.. But the literal meaning of the word nihang has had different meanings in different compositions etc..so can't be taken literally in this case.

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Nihang bana emulates the image of shiva.

The furla is like the water spouting from shiva's head.

Nihangs wear an aad chand, like Shiva's, on their dastaar.

Also, the color they wear is blue.

Nihangs were Shiva worshippers before they converted to Sikhi.

Where did you get this info?

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Nihang bana emulates the image of shiva.

The furla is like the water spouting from shiva's head.

Nihangs wear an aad chand, like Shiva's, on their dastaar.

Also, the color they wear is blue.

Nihangs were Shiva worshippers before they converted to Sikhi.

Every Sikh man, woman and child wore blue. Read any eye-witness account of the early Sikhs written by western and persian authors. They all paint a picture of Sikhs only dressing in blue. Are you suggesting that every Sikh was a nihung ?

Every Sikh man, woman and child was a master of the horse. Do you think they were all nihungs ?

Every Sikh man, woman and child was a master of the sword. Do you think they were all nihungs ?

The term nihung simply became another word to use for the shaheed squads. The suicide squads. They were no better with the sword than any other Sikh but their intoxicated state made them ideal for meaningful dying. Thats all they ever were an that's all they'll ever be.

Today, with the exceptions perhaps of the baba bidi chand dal, they are seen by 99.99% of Sikhs as drop-outs of society. Largely composed of criminals and drug-addicts but largely men that cannot cope with the working demands of life so drop out and join an order.

It didn't take long for 'shiva' to come into this conversation but I've said it before and I'll say it again : The 'farla' in a Sikh's dastar is the flag that flies above our heads. It is directly in response to and flies in the face of the obligatory muslim 'tail' hanging down on a turban.

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Where did you get this info?

Taken From Sikhmuseum.com

Seen in early 19th century images of Nihangs, the design of the Aad Chand emblem has remained relatively unchanged over time. The Sanskrit word ‘Ardh’, meaning half is written as ‘Addh’ in Punjabi. The Sanskrit word ‘Chandra, meaning moon is ‘Chand’ in Punjabi. Aad Chand literally means ‘Half Moon’. [1]
There are two major variations of the Aad Chand worn by Nihangs. The more common one features a crescent moon symbol with a khanda sword at its center and decorative elements below the crescent. The other less common variation featuring three bladed weapons (two curved swords on either side of a central khanda sword) all within the crescent moon. This second variation is called a Gajgah and is traditionally worn by Nihang warriors who have proven themselves on the battle ground. [2]
In Hinduism the crescent moon referred to as Chandra is an ancient lunar deity often associated with the the Vedic Lunar deity Soma. Soma is connected with dew, and as such, is one of the gods of fertility. The crescent moon symbol is always depicted worn on the head in images of the Hindu God Shiva.
Shiva is considered one of the primary deities within various Hindu traditions. Within the Trimurti school of religious thought, Shiva is regarded as the destroyer or transformer. The iconographic association of the moon symbol Chandra on Shivas head date back to the time of the rise of Shiva and his close association with the older Vedic god Rudra. An association between Rudra and Soma can be found in a hymn in the Rig Veda where Soma and Rudra are jointly implored, and in later literature Soma and Rudra came to be identified with one another, as were Soma and the Moon. [3]
Within the Nihang tradition, the wearing of the crescent moon of Shiva is regarded by some members of the sect as an integral part of considering themselves as Shiv Saroop, the very form of Shiva. [4]
Although the crescent moon appears to be a standard element of Shiva iconography, the khanda sword at its middle is not found in images of Shiva. Wearing of the khanda sword within the crescent moon of Shiva has been a popular design variation among the Nihangs. Origins of this implementation remain unclear as the Nihang sect has mainly had an oral tradition. Very rare thousand year old Chola dynasty Shiva tridents from South India in the shape of crescent moons with a khanda sword like center element have a similar appearance, but to date, no direct documented association between the two has been found.
The relationship between the various elements of the Aad Chand symbol as understood and explained by the Budha Dal, the oldest faction within the Nihang sect is as follows:
There are a wide range of complementary understandings all which allow one to analyze the interaction of Shiv-Shakti within the Nihang Singh at various levels. Shiv is believed to be represented by a half moon (Aad Chand), signifying calm and coolness. Shakti is represented by a sun and is believed to be a more powerful energy and the driving force of the universe, within the Sikh tradition Chandi (personification of shakti) or Durga is not worshipped as a deity, but in the form of Bhaguati (sword). The Aad Chand (crescent moon) representing Shiv has long been a trademark of Nihang Singhs as is the wearing of arms; representing the divine union of Shiv and Shakti. [5]
With the emphasis on the sword (Bhagauti) as a reference to God, as the ‘Divine Sword’ in the poetry of Guru Gobind Singh, the Nihangs may have used this symbolic interpretation in their incorporation of the khanda sword within the Shiva crescent moon of their Aad Chand emblem.
Another less common interpretation based on interviews with Budha Dal members conducted in 1992-1993 indicates a interpretation of the Aad Chand emblem as a fertility symbol.
The Add-Chand is made up of two components; the Chand is the Cresecnet moon, and symbol of female fertility, whilst the central piece is a shivling (phallus) and potent representation of Shiva. Note that below the shivling are two balls rather than the hilt of a khanda as there are in the Sikh symbol. [6]
A similar interpretation also appeared in the description of an antique Aad Chand emblem sold by a major auction house.
The Add-Chand symbol was adopted by the Nihang Sikhs in the 17th century and is worn on the 'Dumaala' a type of turban specific to the Nihang. It is made up of two components, the Chand or crescent moon which symbolizes female fertility and the Shivling, a phallic symbol and potent representation of Shiva. [7]
The Shivling phallic symbol as depicted in Hindu religious iconography is typically a smooth rounded cylinder, while the vertical element used by the Nihangs in their Aad Chand emblem has pointed edges and a flat appearance similar to the blade of a sword.
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