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It sounds funny, but need to know. When we invite someone to "roti" (dinner/lunch), how do we prepare for it? I am not sure if this is the right place to ask. Not looking for proper "health/fitness" food, vegetarian only. In reality, how is this done from the first step when the guests arrive, how do we start serving them till end? I know it'll be defferent based on every family budget, all different ideas are welcomed.

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Erm, we usually have many guests but everyone does things differently. We usually do teas/juice, a little starter, a main (roti) and then home time.

I'm not sure if I have answered your question, was a bit unsure of what you was actually asking.

BTW, I like your tag for this topic, unfortunately I'm not one lol :wow:

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It is not clear to me either. Are you asking what food to serve or when to serve or something else? Usually when you have guests you would do as "Seeking the light" has suggested. If the guests were coming at 1pm then you may be able to get away with offering soft drinks and then serving roti, shortly after arrival... if they were coming at an odd time like 3pm, you would usually have a starter... it depends how long you are expecting them to stay, what time you have invited them over.

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well i normally ask them when they arrive if they want tea or cold drink, or water.

Some people give cold drink first like juice and then make tea bit after, but that's india way i think and as a guest i would not be able to have both myself, so thats y i ask their choice.

After a while depending on time of day, if a while from dinner time/roti, we would give samosas, pakoras, spring rolls, with imli and tomatoe sauce, and somtimes crisps if they lucky lol....with desi tea..

they if we know how long they are stayin, normally make daal/sabji with roti and chaul.rice, if u know they are stayin for a while or comin in evening or for lunch then make whatever u would eat for that time, i normally make the daal/sabji in th morning if they comin in evening, so its ready and all that needs to be done is roti to be made or chaul/rice. Salad i cut while they are talkin, or beforehand and put in th fridge, same with th atta for rotia, knead beforehand and put in fridge until time for rotian.

yoghurt we have that nyways, in tubs, normally i rinse all the dishes n glasses. cutlery under water n put side of drainer, so they are ready for when they come.

if u want dessert, we normally get gulab jaman from store, or you could give them cake or make kheer.

thats it really, i tend to go overboard on the condiments, and tissues and light a scented candle so th room smells nice, and open th windows before they come, and i make sure the toilets and sinks are clean and always put out guest towels and soap for them.

thats it basically, but i always ask if they want a sandwich instead, and if they turn up unexpectedly, we get a pizza or make pasta with chips...

i normally think what i would want to eat if i went to somebodys as guest, and what i could digest so tend to keep it minimal and edible, without going over the top on food side. hope that helps.

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lol@Wingz23. i used to think that, but one thing i cannot stand is going to somebodys house and th toilet dirty...maybe me bit fussy in that sense, dont really eat at other people's houses, but if they come to mine, i would give them what we normally eat, not make it a wedding dinner, or a restaurant.

hahahaha but my previous post did sound like a restaurant with th towels etc lol, not my fault im an obsessed cleanliness freak...

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I Hate Serving People, Especially when you have to say

"Thu Lala"

"Nai Teek Hai, Ma Nai Lana"

"Nai Thu Kha"

"Acha Ma Thora Khana Ve"

WHATS THE POINT OF SAYING NO IN THE FIRST, EITHER YOU WANT IT OR YOU DONT!

And to The OP... GOOD LUCK

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I Hate Serving People, Especially when you have to say

"Thu Lala"

"Nai Teek Hai, Ma Nai Lana"

"Nai Thu Kha"

"Acha Ma Thora Khana Ve"

WHATS THE POINT OF SAYING NO IN THE FIRST, EITHER YOU WANT IT OR YOU DONT!

And to The OP... GOOD LUCK

Haha this is excatly what happened to me couple of months ago!

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I Hate Serving People, Especially when you have to say

"Thu Lala"

"Nai Teek Hai, Ma Nai Lana"

"Nai Thu Kha"

"Acha Ma Thora Khana Ve"

WHATS THE POINT OF SAYING NO IN THE FIRST, EITHER YOU WANT IT OR YOU DONT!

And to The OP... GOOD LUCK

But remember people, this doesn't work with goreh!!

I learned the hard way when I was working in retail and helped put furniture in an old mans car. He was going to tip me a 20 and I followed proper indian protocol and said "no, no sir, its ok". Mind you I was reaching out for it at the same time.

The gora said "well your a nice lad" stuffed the 20 in his wallet and walked away.

leaving me looking like: :blink2:

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But remember people, this doesn't work with goreh!!

I learned the hard way when I was working in retail and helped put furniture in an old mans car. He was going to tip me a 20 and I followed proper indian protocol and said "no, no sir, its ok". Mind you I was reaching out for it at the same time.

The gora said "well your a nice lad" stuffed the 20 in his wallet and walked away.

leaving me looking like: :blink2:

HAHAHAHAHHAHAHAHAHAHAHHAHHA!!! I Already Know not to do that with goreh or kale!! As soon as they offer money, you take it and run :D

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