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Tea  

37 members have voted

  1. 1. How do u make your tea?

    • Desi style - water, Laung lechia, tea bags or leaves, saunf, milk, sugar all in one pathila (pan)
      20
    • Western style - tea bag (sugar) (milk) in mug with boiled kettle water
      3
    • Black tea without milk or sugar - western style
      1
    • Black tea with sugar - western style
      0
    • Any sort of herbal tea?
      5
    • Adrak (Ginger)
      5
    • No tea
      9
    • Alternatives or additional info. can be added by replying to the post.
      3


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singhbj singh

Sarbloh Kee Rachhaa Hamnai

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547 posts

Sent Today, 01:24 PM

Bhein ji,

Your topic is poll only but I wanted to give additional info.

It is best to try various herbal teas especially green, which are without caffeine.

I usually drink tea only in winters which include Tulsi, Green, Ginger & my favourite Kahva with cardamom & cinnamon.

All are available online whether in tea bags or containers.

Wish you Good Health.

Waheguru ji ka khalsa

Waheguru ji ki fateh

THANKU FOR POINTING THIS OUT, SORRY IT WAS POLL ONLY BEFORE, I HAVE NOW AMENDED IT, SO REPLIES CAN BE MADE.

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I don't drink tea at all because of the caffeine. I personally consider caffeine an intoxicant but a lot of people disagree with that.

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sants bachan to not drink chaa

ਚਾਹ ਸਿਖ ਵਾਸਤੇ ਬਜ਼ਰ ਕੁਰਾਹਿਤ ਹੈ ਜੇ ਸਿਖ ਅੰਮ੍ਰਿਤ ਛੱਕ ਕੇ ਚਾਹ ਪੀਦਾਂ ਹੈ ਉਹ ਸਿਖ ਨਹੀ ਹੈ,ਇਹ ਲੰਗਰਾਂ ਵਿਚੋ ਵੀ ਬੰਦ ਹੋਣੀ ਚਾਹੀਦੀ ਹੈ

sant ajit singh Nathmalpur Wale

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Does tea make constipation worse?

Yes it can leave some people bloated.

This is usually more come if you suffer with IBS.

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sants bachan to not drink chaa

ਚਾਹ ਸਿਖ ਵਾਸਤੇ ਬਜ਼ਰ ਕੁਰਾਹਿਤ ਹੈ ਜੇ ਸਿਖ ਅੰਮ੍ਰਿਤ ਛੱਕ ਕੇ ਚਾਹ ਪੀਦਾਂ ਹੈ ਉਹ ਸਿਖ ਨਹੀ ਹੈ,ਇਹ ਲੰਗਰਾਂ ਵਿਚੋ ਵੀ ਬੰਦ ਹੋਣੀ ਚਾਹੀਦੀ ਹੈ

sant ajit singh Nathmalpur Wale

Your allowed to drink desi char

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tea is similar to cannabis and has same effects ie it dries your brain cells, also bad for your nerves and causes itching and also bad for your stomach and contributes to Irratable Bowel Syndrome. Tea is an intoxicant and has similar side effects to all those other more abused drugs such as cannabis etc.

Tea is a duretic and so cause dehydration, aswell as flushing (feeling of being warm). Tea is what they call in punjabi 'kushk' i,e, as opposed to something like milk which is full of richness that is good for the brain and enriches the body. Tea is a stimulant like red bull. Its not good stuff. I avoid it as much as possible it dries your mouth and dries your veins.

Take healthy foods like mix nutrament and super malt together in a pint glass and drink

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Extracts from Wikipedia that should raise alarms (make up your own minds!):

Caffeine is a bitter, white crystalline xanthine alkaloid and a stimulant drug. Caffeine is found in varying quantities in the seeds, leaves, and fruit of some plants, where it acts as a natural pesticide that paralyzes and kills certain insects feeding on the plants, as well as enhancing the reward memory of pollinators.

In humans, caffeine acts as a central nervous system stimulant, temporarily warding off drowsiness and restoring alertness. It is the world's most widely consumed psychoactive drug, but unlike many other psychoactive substances, it is legal and unregulated in nearly all parts of the world.

Caffeine overdose can result in a state of central nervous system over-stimulation called caffeine intoxication (DSM-IV 305.90).[44] This syndrome typically occurs only after ingestion of large amounts of caffeine, well over the amounts found in typical caffeinated beverages and caffeine tablets (e.g., more than 400–500 mg at a time). The symptoms of caffeine intoxication are comparable to the symptoms of overdoses of other stimulants: they may include restlessness, fidgeting, anxiety, excitement, insomnia, flushing of the face, increased urination, gastrointestinal disturbance, muscle twitching, a rambling flow of thought and speech, irritability, irregular or rapid heart beat, and psychomotor agitation.[56] In cases of much larger overdoses, mania, depression, lapses in judgment, disorientation, disinhibition, delusions, hallucinations, or psychosis may occur, and rhabdomyolysis (breakdown of skeletal muscle tissue) can be provoked.[57][58]

Extreme overdose can result in death.[59][60] The median lethal dose (LD50) given orally is 192 milligrams per kilogram in rats. The LD50 of caffeine in humans is dependent on individual sensitivity, but is estimated to be about 150 to 200 milligrams per kilogram of body mass or roughly 80 to 100 cups of coffee for an average adult.[61] Though achieving lethal dose of caffeine would be difficult with regular coffee, it is easier to reach high doses with caffeine pills, and the lethal dose can be lower in individuals whose ability to metabolize caffeine is impaired. Chronic liver disease is one factor that can slow the metabolism of caffeine.[62] There has been a reported death of a man who had liver cirrhosis overdosing on caffeinated mints.[63][64][65] Drugs such as fluvoxamine or levofloxacin can have a similar effect by blocking the liver enzyme responsible for the metabolism of caffeine, thus increasing the central effects and blood concentrations of caffeine five-fold.[58][59][60][66] The exact cause of death in such cases is uncertain, but may result from cardiac arrhythmia leading to cardiac arrest.

Treatment of severe caffeine intoxication is generally supportive, providing treatment of the immediate symptoms, but if the patient has very high serum levels of caffeine then peritoneal dialysis, hemodialysis, or hemofiltration may be required.[56]

Addiction and tolerance
Main article: Caffeine addiction

With repetitive use, physical dependence or addiction may occur. Also, some effects of caffeine, particularly the autonomic effects, decrease over time, a phenomenon known as a tolerance. Tolerance develops quickly to some (but not all) effects of caffeine, especially among heavy coffee and energy drink consumers.[67] Some coffee drinkers develop tolerance to its sleep-disrupting effects, but others apparently do not.[31]

Withdrawal

Withdrawal symptoms – including headaches, irritability, inability to concentrate, drowsiness, insomnia, and pain in the stomach, upper body, and joints – may appear within 12 to 24 hours after discontinuation of caffeine intake, peak at roughly 48 hours, and usually last from 2 to 9 days.[68] Withdrawal headaches are experienced by 52% of people who stopped consuming caffeine for two days after an average of 235 mg caffeine per day prior to that.[69] In prolonged caffeine users, symptoms such as increased depression and anxiety, nausea, vomiting, physical pains and intense desire for caffeine are also reported. Peer knowledge, support and interaction may aid withdrawal.

Caffeine withdrawal is categorized as a mental disorder in the DSM-5 (the 5th edition of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual published by the American Psychiatric Association).[70] Previous versions of the manual included "caffeine intoxication" but not caffeine withdrawal.

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Extracts from Wikipedia that should raise alarms (make up your own minds!):

Caffeine is a bitter, white crystalline xanthine alkaloid and a stimulant drug. Caffeine is found in varying quantities in the seeds, leaves, and fruit of some plants, where it acts as a natural pesticide that paralyzes and kills certain insects feeding on the plants, as well as enhancing the reward memory of pollinators.

In humans, caffeine acts as a central nervous system stimulant, temporarily warding off drowsiness and restoring alertness. It is the world's most widely consumed psychoactive drug, but unlike many other psychoactive substances, it is legal and unregulated in nearly all parts of the world.

Caffeine overdose can result in a state of central nervous system over-stimulation called caffeine intoxication (DSM-IV 305.90).[44] This syndrome typically occurs only after ingestion of large amounts of caffeine, well over the amounts found in typical caffeinated beverages and caffeine tablets (e.g., more than 400–500 mg at a time). The symptoms of caffeine intoxication are comparable to the symptoms of overdoses of other stimulants: they may include restlessness, fidgeting, anxiety, excitement, insomnia, flushing of the face, increased urination, gastrointestinal disturbance, muscle twitching, a rambling flow of thought and speech, irritability, irregular or rapid heart beat, and psychomotor agitation.[56] In cases of much larger overdoses, mania, depression, lapses in judgment, disorientation, disinhibition, delusions, hallucinations, or psychosis may occur, and rhabdomyolysis (breakdown of skeletal muscle tissue) can be provoked.[57][58]

Extreme overdose can result in death.[59][60] The median lethal dose (LD50) given orally is 192 milligrams per kilogram in rats. The LD50 of caffeine in humans is dependent on individual sensitivity, but is estimated to be about 150 to 200 milligrams per kilogram of body mass or roughly 80 to 100 cups of coffee for an average adult.[61] Though achieving lethal dose of caffeine would be difficult with regular coffee, it is easier to reach high doses with caffeine pills, and the lethal dose can be lower in individuals whose ability to metabolize caffeine is impaired. Chronic liver disease is one factor that can slow the metabolism of caffeine.[62] There has been a reported death of a man who had liver cirrhosis overdosing on caffeinated mints.[63][64][65] Drugs such as fluvoxamine or levofloxacin can have a similar effect by blocking the liver enzyme responsible for the metabolism of caffeine, thus increasing the central effects and blood concentrations of caffeine five-fold.[58][59][60][66] The exact cause of death in such cases is uncertain, but may result from cardiac arrhythmia leading to cardiac arrest.

Treatment of severe caffeine intoxication is generally supportive, providing treatment of the immediate symptoms, but if the patient has very high serum levels of caffeine then peritoneal dialysis, hemodialysis, or hemofiltration may be required.[56]

Addiction and tolerance
Main article: Caffeine addiction

With repetitive use, physical dependence or addiction may occur. Also, some effects of caffeine, particularly the autonomic effects, decrease over time, a phenomenon known as a tolerance. Tolerance develops quickly to some (but not all) effects of caffeine, especially among heavy coffee and energy drink consumers.[67] Some coffee drinkers develop tolerance to its sleep-disrupting effects, but others apparently do not.[31]

Withdrawal

Withdrawal symptoms – including headaches, irritability, inability to concentrate, drowsiness, insomnia, and pain in the stomach, upper body, and joints – may appear within 12 to 24 hours after discontinuation of caffeine intake, peak at roughly 48 hours, and usually last from 2 to 9 days.[68] Withdrawal headaches are experienced by 52% of people who stopped consuming caffeine for two days after an average of 235 mg caffeine per day prior to that.[69] In prolonged caffeine users, symptoms such as increased depression and anxiety, nausea, vomiting, physical pains and intense desire for caffeine are also reported. Peer knowledge, support and interaction may aid withdrawal.

Caffeine withdrawal is categorized as a mental disorder in the DSM-5 (the 5th edition of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual published by the American Psychiatric Association).[70] Previous versions of the manual included "caffeine intoxication" but not caffeine withdrawal.

In that case guys Chocolate is out too ... don't cry too much :biggrin2:

When I was expecting I couldn't take anything which contained caffeine this included the sweet drug Chocolate ... severe illness not matter which stage . My advice if you are stopping -taper down rather than going cold turkey as you can get really bad symptoms.

remember it is only a temporary boost to alertness the come-down is twice the tiredness

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In that case guys Chocolate is out too ... don't cry too much :biggrin2:

When I was expecting I couldn't take anything which contained caffeine this included the sweet drug Chocolate ... severe illness not matter which stage . My advice if you are stopping -taper down rather than going cold turkey as you can get really bad symptoms.

remember it is only a temporary boost to alertness the come-down is twice the tiredness

Yes we gave up Chocolate just over a year ago, was mortified...but use carob as a substitute. No caffeine.

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