Jump to content

When To Begin Keeping Kesh?


Recommended Posts

Guest Guest

WGJKK WGJKF

I am still new to Sikhism, and I'm not sure when to begin keeping kesh. For a bit of information - I come from a Hasidic Jewish background, which is where I gained my idea of what/who God is. At its heart, the panentheistic idea of God is the same in Judaism and Sikhi. But Judaism is very ritual based, and I don't want to fall prey to the idea that ritual = connection to Waheguru. I know this is only obtained through proper meditation and action, and I don't want to fall back into a Jewish mindset.

That said, I feel my background has given me the ability to readily understand and accept the importance of kesh. As you know, Hasidic men keep their beards completely uncut for spiritual reasons, so it wasn't a stretch in my mind to apply this to the hair on my head as well. It makes logical sense. I feel I understand the importance of kesh, but I would like the opinions of others so that I can feel comfortable it isn't my ego talking. An outside perspective is always helpful when deciding matters such as this.

My worry, is that I have only been studying sikhi and reading gurbani for one month. I don't want to adopt an outward symbol of my beliefs if it could lead to problems with my ego finding spiritual fulfillment in the physical. There is also the issue of if I keep kesh, it seems most appropriate to cover it with a turban. Like the poster here yesterday, I don't think I would feel comfortable doing this for several years. I would want my actions and understanding of Sikhi to be aligned properly. At the same time, I no longer feel comfortable cutting my hair. I feel a little lost.

So, what is your opinion? I have read, and read, and read everything on Sikhi I can find on the internet, and I am nearly done reading a translation of the SGGS. Is one month of study too soon to adopt one of the five K's? Could I be placing too much emphasis on the physical? Perhaps that last question is one only I could answer, but I appreciate opinions nonetheless.

Link to post
Share on other sites

You read, you understood, now you yourself decide what is better for you. Many people i should say sikh people think that if they will keep hair than only they will be a true sikh but this is not the case. All the 5 Ks which we being amritdhari sikhs wear n have has some scientific approach. It is clearly mentioned in the translated version of Shri Guru Granth Sahib ji that we should live according to the will of God and the way he made us. Keeping kesh actually indicates that you agree to the design pattern of God and according to my R & D that i did for the importance of kesh, I came to know that long kesh helps human to connect with god it centralize the brain power to a point which makes the element of our brain to work in accordance with the instruction we pass which leads to a connection with God. Lastly i would like to say Sikh religion is made with practical approach, try to solve your queries scientifically. :) All the Best :)

Link to post
Share on other sites

Respectfully wouldnt it be great if EVERYONE kept kesh? Wouldnt have to be a Sikh. Its natural...I know of no animal that shapes and shaves. Imagine a Lion without his crown. Do what is right for you. You will never please everyone but why should you care? Between you and your Guru. But a point to consider is your family. Maybe you should see if you are truly comfortable with this new path for longer than a month before diving into a whole new identity. If you find yourself back in Judaism it will prove difficult to yourself and those around you. Sikhi isnt about conversion and many sikhs will advise you to follow your own faith unless you are unable to do so. But of course its your journey. :)

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest Guest

Thank you both for your advice. I will look into the scientific benefits more. I have only glanced at this information, and it deserves further study.

Jeevan - you are very right that I should be sure this is a path I will believe in longer than a month. I was right to ask for advice, as it is now obvious to me I am becoming too worried about the physical. I will instead focus my energies on waking early for meditation and seva for the time being. After all - the heart of Sikhi is in the meditation of Waheguru, and the service of others. I will work on connecting with God first, and worry about kesh later, for the sake of my family. Thank you for this thought.

And thank you for your kind words. I was blessed to be born into a religion that has a strong mystical and scholastic tradition, which made a few Sikh concepts easy to accept and understand on an elementary level. And remember, for every step you take towards Waheguru, he takes 1000 towards you. There is a hundred lifetimes of Sikhi to learn and read, and it's fine to be snowed under, so long as you're always trying to clear the path, however short or long that takes. I don't mean to speak out of turn, as I am still so new, only to encourage you not to feel overwhelmed. So long as you are walking towards Waheguru, then he is sprinting towards you. This is something I try to remember when feeling the awesome weight of this truth, and it inspires me to get off Facebook and at least get on a Sikh forum! lol

Link to post
Share on other sites

You are indeed blessed. I have so much respect for Hassidic movement. I think you can find more than all the answers you are looking for in that faith. There are so many similarities both on a physical and spiritual levels. As far as Internet is concerned I was merely stating that you can't have possibly read everything by now. We would need a few lifetimes just to view every page on Sikhi. In that way I meant you can easily get snowed under and forget the most important one in it all. How many of us end up trying to impress each other rather than the One that really matters. Who has the biggers Kara, the most beautiful kirpan etc. Internet is important but its too easy to get engrossed and snowed under.

Link to post
Share on other sites

changey bandeh hundey eh jew.

bachaareh, ... sadeh wangh.. they gave alot of kurbaniyan.

You probably do come across more of them but they stay quiet, not loud and rowdy like many of us jatts.

very similar to sikh>>>i had neighbour before.

>>they cover their torah with beutifal rumallah.

>>adoneh efaad is what they say and mean ek onkaar.

>>believe in Daswandh

>>they have like a manji sahib as well for their torah.

>>cover their heads..

>>faith in the naam of god

>>>probably some more as well...

Link to post
Share on other sites

changey bandeh hundey eh jew.

bachaareh, ... sadeh wangh.. they gave alot of kurbaniyan.

You probably do come across more of them but they stay quiet, not loud and rowdy like many of us jatts.

very similar to sikh>>>i had neighbour before.

>>they cover their torah with beutifal rumallah.

>>adoneh efaad is what they say and mean ek onkaar.

>>believe in Daswandh

>>they have like a manji sahib as well for their torah.

>>cover their heads..

>>faith in the naam of god

>>>probably some more as well...

lol...khatto khatt..oh bichaare nu ta baksh de ohnu b tu Jattizm da path pardhon lag pya... jithe dekho tu bahmna di shatar chaya di gal krda disda...

Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest Guest

Shaheedjatt - you are very right that Sikhi and Judaism have much in common. More than I have time to list here. I left religious Jewish observance many years ago, because the rituals and exclusiveness clouded my relationship with God, but what I learned growing up about what/who the Creator is, impacted me greatly and I never forgot those truths. I searched for years trying to find a way to practice Judaism without feeling the weight of the rituals, but I couldn't, so I turned my focus to other religions. I eventually found sikhi, and I realized I've been a Sikh this whole time, I just didn't know it until recently! One thing I love about Sikhi is the respect they have for other religions. This is absent in many forms of Judaism, and I always found that aspect sad that we couldn't accept other faiths as having a connection to Ik Onkar. The encouragement here is humbling.

Would anyone be willing to translate the (what I assume is) Punjabi written here? I would be very grateful.

British Singh - thank you for the videos. The first one especially helped me think about kesh in a different way.

Jeevan - my apologies for misunderstanding, or even coming across as spiritually arrogant. The internet can be a tough place to accurately convey meaning. Thank you for your time and perspective. You are very right that Waheguru is the only one who matters.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You are posting as a guest. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.
Note: Your post will require moderator approval before it will be visible.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...


×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

Terms of Use