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3 Big Rehat / Sikhi Question


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#1 do you all ways have to wear keski even when you shower? where in the rehat it says you all ways have to wear one even when you shower,,, the big thing for me is wearing it during showers it really hard. #2 when you have wet dreams do you have to wash everything your keski as well I know you have to wash your other clothes/ do you also have to wash your kesh when that happens/ do you everyday have to wash your kesh it is hard every day if you wake up and wash kesh but your kesh will stay wet for the entire day. #3 How do you stop wet dreams from happening for me it seems impossible, as when your a sleep your suchate mind is not there somehow, and you just make mistakes in dreams For everything pleas try to tell me by rehat or from Gurubani and if not just explain why or what you would do thank you

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For number one you do not need to wear keski at all times... Keski is not kakaar so its not that you have to wear it at all times... You can wear keski after kesi ishnan.. That is what I do...

For number two just wash everything... Blow dry your hair after kesi ishnan or use a fan in the summer to dry your hair. That way your hair will not be wet for the whole day. I know this cause I kesi ishnan everyday...

Number 3: To stop wet dreams are really hard.... Exercise every day... Eat healthy...Do ardaas every night that you do not get wet dreams. That's the only advice I can give you..

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#1 do you all ways have to wear keski even when you shower? where in the rehat it says you all ways have to wear one even when you shower,,, the big thing for me is wearing it during showers it really hard.

keski is there to protect the hair from getting dirty and makes the dastar more sturdy. People that do not tie a keski, don't realize how tying the same dastar from a day before without washing it, has dust on it. The keski helps keep the hair clean. What is the practical reason to wear a keski in the shower? Tying a keski on the head and wanting to take a kesi ishaan, beat the purpose of having a kesi ishaan. Tying it anywhere else on the body is pointless because you are cleaning your body and the keski tied around your waist or anywhere else is being splattered with the sweat and dirt coming off the upper torso. When everyone was taking their bathes in rivers it made since to keep a keski on you. The keski can be washed after you cleansed the body and you don't need to go back into the river to wash one simple keski. Also it was a good way to be prepared for any unpredictable issues and you need to tie the hair up quick and go. Today we shower in tiled showers with racks. We have washer machines for washing everything. Keski tied around the waist, for what reason? Watch how some fanatic will say the keski has some magical spiritual powers and I will be cursed to hell for saying this. I dry my air in the natural wind because it is healthy for the hair. If it's cold and raining, do it inside the house and don't use blow dryers. Blow dryers damage the hair and any Sikh who considers their hair a gift from God will not intentionally damage their God given gift right!!!! :biggrin2: Seen photos of Gursikhs drying their hair fully uncovered and in the natural wind too. Just in case you are wondering if Gursikhs do it. Keeping the hair always in a keski or a keski and dastar has to do with being tyar bar tyar. Ready to go when the call comes. Singhs that live in combat zones should be aware of how fast they can get ready and be prepared to fight. Yet majority of the Singhs today live in combat free zones and only thing we need to be prepared for is the next scary movie coming out on the big screen. And this is coming from a Singh who works in the field of not knowing when a physical altercation will break out in a split second on the job. A good example of being tyar bar tyar is when Singhs were being hunted by the Punjab police in the 1980s and 1990s in India. In this time it was making sure the gun barrel, chambers, and magazines are free of dirt, grime and oiled.

Your other two questions have been covered by the previous posters.

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It is a common sense that while washing hair, keski cannot be tied on the head. It has to be removed just like a kangha but it does not justify keeping it away from the body. You ask for practical purpose for keski but the same reasoning can be used against kangha which is used to comb hair so what purpose does it serve while doing kes ishnaan? While washing hair, the keski must be kept on the body because as soon as one is done washing hair, he can tie the keski and then take body shower. Kangha is also kept on the body and then tucked into the hair. Keski doesnt just keep hair clean, it keeps them tied and protected. Its symbolical significance also cannot be ignored at any time. Tying a kirpan on the head while showering in nearly impossible without a keski unless one wears a very small kirpan which is not only useless but against the very idea of wearing a kirpan. All Sikhs who keep keski with them change it to a clean one as soon as they come out of the shower. But do you change gatra after every shower? Do you wash your kirpan after shower since it gets splattered with same dust and sweat? Besides, Sikhs who shower everyday rarely get as dirty as you claim unless their job requires them to work in a dusty and unclean environment.

Convenience such as tiled showers do not justify ignoring the significance of keski. One can go further and undermine keeping kirpan with the body by saying that these days they sleep in a house with security alarm situated in a gated community. One could undermine kachera by saying no one sees them naked in a locked door shower. Every Sikh should be tyar bar tyar not just the ones in a combat zone. Every Sikh is a saint-soldier so the same principles apply to all regardless of where they are. Like you said, you never know when the situation may arise requiring you to quickly tie your hair and get ready. While showering, you could experience break in, robbery, theft etc. If you rather fight the criminals bare-headed, it is your choice but dont undermine keski.

Drying hair in open air is best. I never said that using a blow dryer is recommended. For some it is useful when they have to quickly get ready to go to work and the hair are still somewhat wet. If one can do without it, it is better but it is also not healthy for hair to be tied wet all day long. Rest is your choice.

Keski is a small turban that covers the hair. Any dastar worn on top of it is called pagg, Gurmukhi dastaar or dumalla depending on the style and type of turban. There are numerous rehatnamas that speak of wearing dastar. Guru Rakha

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It is a common sense that while washing hair, keski cannot be tied on the head. It has to be removed just like a kangha but it does not justify keeping it away from the body. You ask for practical purpose for keski but the same reasoning can be used against kangha which is used to comb hair so what purpose does it serve while doing kes ishnaan? While washing hair, the keski must be kept on the body because as soon as one is done washing hair, he can tie the keski and then take body shower. Kangha is also kept on the body and then tucked into the hair. Keski doesnt just keep hair clean, it keeps them tied and protected. Its symbolical significance also cannot be ignored at any time. Tying a kirpan on the head while showering in nearly impossible without a keski unless one wears a very small kirpan which is not only useless but against the very idea of wearing a kirpan. All Sikhs who keep keski with them change it to a clean one as soon as they come out of the shower. But do you change gatra after every shower? Do you wash your kirpan after shower since it gets splattered with same dust and sweat? Besides, Sikhs who shower everyday rarely get as dirty as you claim unless their job requires them to work in a dusty and unclean environment.

Convenience such as tiled showers do not justify ignoring the significance of keski. One can go further and undermine keeping kirpan with the body by saying that these days they sleep in a house with security alarm situated in a gated community. One could undermine kachera by saying no one sees them naked in a locked door shower. Every Sikh should be tyar bar tyar not just the ones in a combat zone. Every Sikh is a saint-soldier so the same principles apply to all regardless of where they are. Like you said, you never know when the situation may arise requiring you to quickly tie your hair and get ready. While showering, you could experience break in, robbery, theft etc. If you rather fight the criminals bare-headed, it is your choice but dont undermine keski.

Drying hair in open air is best. I never said that using a blow dryer is recommended. For some it is useful when they have to quickly get ready to go to work and the hair are still somewhat wet. If one can do without it, it is better but it is also not healthy for hair to be tied wet all day long. Rest is your choice.

Keski is a small turban that covers the hair. Any dastar worn on top of it is called pagg, Gurmukhi dastaar or dumalla depending on the style and type of turban. There are numerous rehatnamas that speak of wearing dastar. Guru Rakha

I respect your understanding of Gurbani, but on this topic you are really reaching, when you have nothing to reach for.

While washing hair, the keski must be kept on the body because as soon as one is done washing hair, he can tie the keski and then take body shower.

Why can't the keski be hung close by? Why would a person tie a keski around the body while showering and then take the same keski and tie it around the head hair, which the person just washed? The keski is unclean and tying it on the washed hair will make the hair unclean again. Might as well not take a keshi ishaan, if you are going to do this. If you are this paranoid about it. It's better to keep a clean keski close by and tie the clean keski around the wet hair and remove the unclean keski off the body. Keski keeps the hair protected!! Are there birds in your bathroom ready to take one on your head? Do you see what I mean by really reaching for an answer here. What symbolic significance does all this have; what you are saying? Kangha can be tied on the kirpan gatra and put to the side.

Tying a kirpan on the head while showering in nearly impossible without a keski unless one wears a very small kirpan which is not only useless but against the very idea of wearing a kirpan. All Sikhs who keep keski with them change it to a clean one as soon as they come out of the shower. But do you change gatra after every shower? Do you wash your kirpan after shower since it gets splattered with same dust and sweat?

Have more than one gatra and kirpan, problem solved. What is the need to tie a kirpan around the head? Also do tell me how you tie your 3 foot kirpan around your head?

Besides, Sikhs who shower everyday rarely get as dirty as you claim unless their job requires them to work in a dusty and unclean environment.

Yea the pot belly and super lazy Sikhs don't get dirty as I say because they sit around all day in their sweat and don't realize they are sweating. It's common sense, the body sweats and whether in urban or rural areas there is dust.

One can go further and undermine keeping kirpan with the body by saying that these days they sleep in a house with security alarm situated in a gated community.

lol....gated communities. Gated community people are sleeping with firearms under/around/close to their beds. Old grandma's are wielding shotguns. Kirpan is a form of protection anytime and can be easily concealed if needed. Best protection is the kirpan because of it's capacity to do the most damage in the least amount of time. A person can be stabbed easily 10 times in 5 seconds. Only you will make this ridiculous argument. Here are some "21st century" facts for you. Just because the house alarm goes off, does not mean the police officer magically appears at your door in a split second; not superman. We are talking about real life not hollywood movies. And today crooks, rapist, and killers can jump over the 50 000 dollar fence around your gated community because your hard earned tax dollars paid for the gym equipment in correctional facilities.

Like you said, you never know when the situation may arise requiring you to quickly tie your hair and get ready.

Yes, but in the context of bathing in a river.

While showering, you could experience break in, robbery, theft etc. If you rather fight the criminals bare-headed, it is your choice but dont undermine keski.

Okay, now it's time to get real. Your simple little keski will be knocked off your head in a split second and wrapped around your neck to chock you out. Dastars come off so fast and so do dumalla. No magic powers in dumalla that keep them on your head in a fight. Have you seen the recent video of two Singhs going at it in a nagar kirtan in US? Dastars were knocked off like soccer balls being kicked around. What about the video, where Taksali Singhs in Canada tried to forcibly remove Ghagga off a Gurdwara stage. One guys dastar was knocked off and he had his hair completely open. Stop playing cowboys and Indians with your action figure dolls.

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Keski cant be hung close by for the same reasons kirpan and kangha cant be hung close by. The principle listed in the rehatnamas is that a Sikh should not be bare-headed with exception of while washing and combing hair. Walking around bare-headed with open hair does not behoove a Sikh. Guru Sahib always kept it on them and so did Sikhs in early days. It was not because of war times but because of Gurmat principles. Bhai Randhir Singh and Bhai Vir Singh also did not part from their turbans. I rather agree with naam abhiyasi Gursikhs than lazy pot belly people who have forgotton their heritage due to modern luxuries. If you argue that time has changed then you are making the rehat circumstantial and time dependent which is against the universality of Sikhi. Keeping keski away from you opens the door to many other exceptions and renders the Sikh not tyar bar tyar. If keski is not necessary under one condition then others will come up with their own exceptions using the same reasoning that you are.

How dirty do you think the Sikhs are? Are Sikhs supposed to tie such dirty keskis which immediately get the hair dirty? No. Tying a dirty keski will get the hair dirty and I never said one should tie a dirty keski on their head. Unless ones head was full of dirt and mud, I fail to see how keski could get so dirty that it will get washed hair dirty. Besides, when keski is tied like a kamar kassa, it barely gets wet during kesi ishnaan. A Sikh is not supposed to tie a torn and a dirty turban unless he has no other option at all.

You say have more than one gatra but that is exactly my point. Have more than one keski. But rehat does not allow keeping kakkars and keski separated from the body. Have you ever seen a Sikh being cremated with all the kakkars but no turban? It is part of the Khalsa lifestyle. Tying kirpan on the head during shower means never to part from it. It must be kept with a Sikh at all times. It doesnt have to be a lengthy kirpan but close to 9 inches is preferred so that it still serves a purpose when the need arises. Again, conveniences dont outdate the rehat. We have luxuries and conveniences now but whos to say the circumstance wont change in the future or for future generations. And again, since rehat is not time dependent, it cannot be abandoned and readopted depending on the circumstance.

I see you got my point about gated communities. What you missed was that you are making such arguments and rejecting rehat due to conveniences. It is about our own opinions and thoughts. Someone using the same reasoning as you could reject kirpan on the same grounds. There are many who hung it close by during sleep but it doesnt make it right. You say keski is not needed during shower but I say it is whether one is in a tiled shower or in a river. Time and place dont matter. Rehat cannot be changed over time. Time and situation change but rehat must be kept the same unless you think Guru Sahib wasnt thinking all the way and He wasnt aware of the future luxuries.

Finally, you argue that turbans get knocked off during fights. To be honest, I do not watch Gurdwara fights videos so no comment there. But should we then take turbans off during fights? And if someone could take your turban off and choke you with it, then the same person could also take out your kirpan and stab you with it. Should we conclude that turban and kirpan do more harm to a Sikh than benefit him? Absolutely not. If a Sikh is really that weak then perhaps he should think about whether it is even practical for him to keep this lifestyle. It is analogous to saying a criminal could snatch a gun from a cop and shoot him. In such a case, the fault lies with the cop not with the gun. Similarly, the fault will lie with a Sikh not with a turban or a kirpan.

Ultimately, the choice is yours. Sikhs will not always be taking showers in tiled bathrooms. A situation may arise at any time requiring him to quickly get ready and run towards the enemy rather than towards the close by hanger. It is one of the things we learn from The Great Holocaust. If you argue that Sikhs in a combat zone could keep such rehat then you are insinuating that rehat is circumstantial whereas rehat is one for all. I am not here to force my thinking on you or others. For me, keeping every rehat and tradition regardless of how minor it is or how impractical it may seem must be kept because I care for the blessing and khushi of Guru Sahib. If it was useless it wouldnt be there to begin with. You may find yourself better off without it and that is your prerogative. Guru Rakha

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Keski cant be hung close by for the same reasons kirpan and kangha cant be hung close by.

This is AKJ thinking. Punj kakkar does not include keski. I can't remember which Granth, but it's Sarbloh Granth Sahib or Sri Dasam Granth Sahib that list the Punj Kakkar; keski is not listed as one of the Kakkars.

If you argue that time has changed then you are making the rehat circumstantial and time dependent which is against the universality of Sikhi.

This is the crux of your argument, but it fails the test of timelessness. Sikhi doesn't fail, but your irrational thinking does. The color green was forbidden to be worn by the Sikhs because it was the colour of the Muslims. But today the colour of the Muslims is black and brown (ISIS). According to you the Guru could not see the future and did not list these two colors as also forbidden to be worn for the time to come.

Tying kirpan on the head during shower means never to part from it. It must be kept with a Sikh at all times. It doesnt have to be a lengthy kirpan but close to 9 inches is preferred so that it still serves a purpose when the need arises. Again, conveniences dont outdate the rehat.
We have luxuries and conveniences now but whos to say the circumstance wont change in the future or for future generations. And again, since rehat is not time dependent, it cannot be abandoned and readopted depending on the circumstance.

The Guru gave a 2 to 3 foot kirpans to the Sikhs as the time and need was for long kirpans. You can deny it all you like, but it is a fact. The kirpans are on display at the Takhts. Today you and your pals have changed it to 9 inches kirpans because it best suits you. Yet you have the audacity to come on here and condemn everyone who does not follow your hand picked made up rehat on keski.

Unless ones head was full of dirt and mud, I fail to see how keski could get so dirty that it will get washed hair dirty. Besides, when keski is tied like a kamar kassa, it barely gets wet during kesi ishnaan. A Sikh is not supposed to tie a torn and a dirty turban unless he has no other option at all.

because you live in a fairy land where sweat does not exist. You must have some special fans up in your dastar for temperature control. What's next AC technology in that dastar.

I see you got my point about gated communities.

You showed nothing, other than your lack of knowledge on how to protect yourself in today's era. The kirpan will never be outdated because humans bleed. When humans stop bleeding and skin is replaced by steel, then it will surely be outdated as a defense weapon and so will firearms.

Time and situation change but rehat must be kept the same unless you think Guru Sahib wasnt thinking all the way and He wasnt aware of the future luxuries.

Guru Sahib didn't have to think anything through. Guru Sahib is perfect and knows everything. Rehat has changed over time from Sri Guru Nanak Dev ji to Sri Guru Gobind Singh Sahib ji. You can't and won't accept it.

Finally, you argue that turbans get knocked off during fights. To be honest, I do not watch Gurdwara fights videos so no comment there. But should we then take turbans off during fights?

Here is your original comment:

While showering, you could experience break in, robbery, theft etc. If you rather fight the criminals bare-headed, it is your choice but dont undermine keski.

You were talking about fight people bare-headed and I simply showed you how your dastar is going to come off in a fight. It had nothing to do with not wearing it all together. Go get some rest, you cannot understand or purposely twist words.

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This is AKJ thinking. Punj kakkar does not include keski. I can't remember which Granth, but it's Sarbloh Granth Sahib or Sri Dasam Granth Sahib that list the Punj Kakkar; keski is not listed as one of the Kakkars.

Yes but its not like you follow the Taksali rehit about keeping kirpan and kangha on you at all times, akalifauj.

The reason we should keep rehits as they are is due to slippery slope and leniency. Slippery slope might be a logical fallacy but it exists in the real world especially when passing down traditions. In fact women used to wear dastaars before and due to leniency now some people question whether women are allowed to take amrit.

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