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eduardo

The Langar

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Howdy folks.

Some of you may have read I work with quite a few Punjabi Sikhs which is fine.

Today the ladies all clubbed together and produced a whole load of food for charity, the cause being the Nepalese earthquake.

Very touching sentiments and very community spirited.

What I really want to say is out of all religions the langar is a real winner.

There is nothing like food to bring people together and create a good atmosphere.

Brilliant idea and nice to see the tradition is still very much alive and kicking.

It's one of the best things in the world.

Incidentally how important is speaking Punjabi to Sikh people?

Does the language have words and expressions that just cannot be found in English?

All the women speak good English but when together prefer to speak in this tongue.

Why is this?

Many thanks.

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Like Italian there's phrases and sayings in Panjabi that don't quite have the same impact when translated in English. I don't think it's being rude tbh, as long as there's not a deliberate effort to alienate a non-Panjabi speaker from the conversation. It's just a relaxing way to express yourself in the language of the old country, hehe.

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It makes my head spin round and round which is a real pity because I like the culture but just can't get over the language.

Is it hard to learn?

Is the pronounciation difficult for a western English speaking tongue?

Is Panjabi a tonal language with rising and lowering tones attached to each word?

I hear there are loads of local dialects and everything, what chance have I got?

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Waheguru Ji Ka Khalsa Waheguru Ji Ki Fateh

Speaking Gurmukhi is similar, to Punjabi but not exactly same.

There are some phrases, that are just more fun to say in Punjabi then english, and when i'm with my friends we tend like what or how you doing in punjabi.

Learning it won't be that difficult, If you learn it you can speak/read Gurbani much better.

Check out these people, there from America and can probably speak much better Gurmukhi and Punjabi than me. Link

You could learn from Basics of Sikhi they got some videos on learning Gurmukhi

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Guest Jacfsing2

It makes my head spin round and round which is a real pity because I like the culture but just can't get over the language.

Is it hard to learn?

Is the pronounciation difficult for a western English speaking tongue?

Is Panjabi a tonal language with rising and lowering tones attached to each word?

I hear there are loads of local dialects and everything, what chance have I got?

Punjabi is easier than English. (Every language is),pronunciation is different because if you look at the romanized version of Guru Sahib you would have to speak the letters differently from normal English.

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Waheguru Ji Ka Khalsa Waheguru Ji Ki Fateh

Speaking Gurmukhi is similar, to Punjabi but not exactly same.

There are some phrases, that are just more fun to say in Punjabi then english, and when i'm with my friends we tend like what or how you doing in punjabi.

Learning it won't be that difficult, If you learn it you can speak/read Gurbani much better.

Check out these people, there from America and can probably speak much better Gurmukhi and Punjabi than me. Link

You could learn from Basics of Sikhi they got some videos on learning Gurmukhi

Gurmukhi is not Punjabi.

Gurmukhi is a script the Gurus used to write bani. This is because they wanted to use a script that was easy to learn and was available to everyone. The Hindu and Abrahamic scriptures were in the hands of scholars and priests, only they could read it. Low castes were not even allowed to listen to the Vedas, the Brahmins would put metal in their ears if they listened to the Vedas.

The Gurus wanted their bani to be read by many people. Gurmukhi is the script they used to write bani. The Guru Granth Sahib is written in many languages and dialects, often there is a combination of languages used, but they always wrote in Gurmukhi. So you can't speak Gurmukhi because its not a language, its a script.

Gurmukhi doesn't have any special rules or silent letters. You spell words phonetically when if you are using Gurmukhi. Its quite easy to learn.

Punjabi might be a bit harder, but if you stay around Punjabi people and study Punjabi, you should be able to pick it up.

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Gurmukhi is not Punjabi.

Gurmukhi is a script the Gurus used to write bani. This is because they wanted to use a script that was easy to learn and was available to everyone. The Hindu and Abrahamic scriptures were in the hands of scholars and priests, only they could read it. Low castes were not even allowed to listen to the Vedas, the Brahmins would put metal in their ears if they listened to the Vedas.

The Gurus wanted their bani to be read by many people. Gurmukhi is the script they used to write bani. The Guru Granth Sahib is written in many languages and dialects, often there is a combination of languages used, but they always wrote in Gurmukhi. So you can't speak Gurmukhi because its not a language, its a script.

Gurmukhi doesn't have any special rules or silent letters. You spell words phonetically when if you are using Gurmukhi. Its quite easy to learn.

Punjabi might be a bit harder, but if you stay around Punjabi people and study Punjabi, you should be able to pick it up.

Thanks for correcting me, didn't know that :)

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