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Sikh Population In Punjab Is 57 % Which Was 60% In 2001 Census.


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Quantavius bro we already have such an organisation in place - the SGPC. The problem is it is riddled by corruption so we have to peacefully seize back control or set-up a parallel organisation which

When you factor in the massive amount of Indian labourers we Sikhs ourselves have had to bring in to Punjab to work our fields and the massive amount of Sikh emigration to places such as Canada, Ameri

Haanji Hrman Paji ehda ke 2011 di figure (1.7%) nu 2001 naal divide kareyo Ji (1.9%) 2011 percentage of Indian population (1.7%) = 89.47% of 2001 percentage (1.9%) figure. Thus the percentage declin

I believe that one day India is going to be a Christian nation. All those low castes will convert to Christianity.I believe it's inevitable.

Christian missionaries can try but I doubt the Hindus would let it happen without a bloodbath. These missionaries are banned in most parts of India because Hindus start rioting and killing Christians. The only place where riots dont happen is in Punjab because Sikhs don't let kattar Hindus do what they do to Christians in rest of India. And how do these Christians repay us? These snakes began targeting Sikh Mazhabis for conversion. They don't even target Hindu dalits in Punjab, only us!

Sikh leaders need to be very watchful of these missionary activities. Just look at how they managed to grow and dominate the once Buddhist South Korea. Lets not only concentrate on Hindus and ignore Christian and Muslim growth in Punjab which has increased significantly.

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Christian missionaries can try but I doubt the Hindus would let it happen without a bloodbath. These missionaries are banned in most parts of India because Hindus start rioting and killing Christians. The only place where riots dont happen is in Punjab because Sikhs don't let kattar Hindus do what they do to Christians in rest of India. And how do these Christians repay us? These snakes began targeting Sikh Mazhabis for conversion. They don't even target Hindu dalits in Punjab, only us!

Sikh leaders need to be very watchful of these missionary activities. Just look at how they managed to grow and dominate the once Buddhist South Korea. Lets not only concentrate on Hindus and ignore Christian and Muslim growth in Punjab which has increased significantly.

Can you tell me how will they stop it? How will they stop Indian based missionaries from converting low caste Hindus? There are no laws against it. It will happen slowly but surely. When other low castes see their former brethren being treated equally in another religion and obtaining support/help from the church, they will follow suit.

Where are missionaries in India banned? I was recently in South India (Chennai) and I was taken aback with the type of Christian evangelical shows (from the US) they have there. And not one mind you. I believe it was 3 channels. Judging from these shows I'm guessing there is a pretty large denomination of Christians in the South.

Just like English is the unofficial 'official' language in India, the same will happen with religion. You cannot stop it no matter how hard you try.

Instead of getting angry with the missionaries we must ask ourselves, why did these former Sikhs convert to Christianity? If we truly practiced 'wand ke shekao' it would be very hard for missionaries to convert Sikhs. Don;t get angry with the missionaries. Take a hard look at ourselves.

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Would that really be a bad thing? We had the last 500 years to try our plan. Now its the christians turn.

To be honest I don't see it as a bad thing if the denomination are Protestants. We could actually learn a thing or 2 from the Protestants. Their concept of charity is unsurpassed.

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Guest Jacfsing2

To be honest I don't see it as a bad thing if the denomination are Protestants. We could actually learn a thing or 2 from the Protestants. Their concept of charity is unsurpassed.

Mother Teresa is Catholic.
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Indian Dalits find no refuge from caste in Christianity

By Swaminathan NatarajanBBC Tamil
_49024451_wall_466.jpgImage caption Till death do us part: Dalits are buried on the other side of the wall in this cemetery

Many in India were told to embraced Christianity to escape the age-old caste oppression of the Hindu social order, but Christianity itself in some places is finding it difficult to shrug off the worst of caste discrimination.

In the town of Trichy, situated in the heart of the southern Indian state of Tamil Nadu, a wall built across the Catholic cemetery clearly illustrates how caste-based prejudice persists.

Those who converted to Christianity from the formerly "untouchable" Hindu caste groups known as Dalits are allocated space for burial on one side of the wall, while upper-caste converts are buried on the other side.

The separating wall was built over six decades ago.

_49031596_yesuman.jpg
Caste discrimination is rampant in the Catholic Church Father Yesumariyan, Jesuit lawyer, Dalit campaigner

"This violates the Indian constitution. It is inhuman. It's humiliating," says Rajendiran, secretary general of Periyar Dravidar Kazhagam, a small socio-political group that has announced a protest demanding the removal of the wall.

The Catholic Church in India says it does not approve of caste discrimination. But it says it is helpless in resolving this issue.

"The burial ground is owned by private individuals, so we are not able to do anything about this.

Yet burials continue to take place in the controversial cemetery, presided over by Catholic priests.

For centuries Hindus, Muslims and Christians from different castes have been cremated or buried in different places, according to their caste.

'Cementing caste'

This practice is fading in the big cities and towns, but in some places in rural Tamil Nadu, caste-based graveyards are still in operation.

_49024448_dalits_afp_304.jpgImage caption Discrimination against Dalits persists in all strata of Indian society

Dalit Christians are demanding more proactive steps from the Church to remove the wall.

Father Lourdunathan Yesumariyan, a Jesuit, practising lawyer and Dalit-Christian activist, says the Church has the legal power to remove the wall.

Even though the cemetery is on privately owned land, he says, a recent high court judgement ruled that the Church has full responsibility as it administers the graveyard.

"The failure to remove the wall only helps cement caste feelings," he adds.

The influential land-owning upper-caste Christian built it.

The Church is meanwhile accused by critics of refusing to give "just representation" for Dalits in its power structure, even while it campaigns for a separate quota for the Dalit Christians in government jobs.

Fr Yesumariyan says: "In Tamil Nadu, over 70% of Catholics are Dalit converts. But only four out of 18 bishops are from the Dalit-Christian community.

"In many places influential caste groups have lobbied and made sure that only the person belonging to their caste is being appointed as bishop in their diocese."

He says that in places where Dalit Christians are the majority, they often struggle to get the top job.

Untouchablity 'everywhere'

In recent years a small number of jobs and seats have been earmarked in Catholic-run schools and colleges for members of the Dalit-Christian community.

_49024447_communion_afp_304.jpgImage caption There are estimated to be more than 17 million Catholics in India

But this is being challenged by upper caste Christians in the court on the grounds that "there is no caste in Christianity".

Fr Yesumariyan continues: "The Indian constitution says it has abolished untouchablity. But it is everywhere. In the same way, the Catholic Church says there is no caste bias but caste discrimination is rampant in the Church.

"There are hardly any inter-caste marriages among converted Christians. Until recently, Church-run magazines carried matrimonial advertisements containing specific caste references."

A few churches in Tamil Nadu have even been closed after Dalit Christians demanded a share in the administration.

"We say there is no caste in Christianity," says Fr Chinnadurai. "But in India, Christianity was not able to get rid of caste.

"Those who converted to Christianity brought their caste prejudices with them."

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DFzmgS5yJlI

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Your point? Protestants are very generous. See how much America donates to Africa.

We shouldn't be giving foreign aid, the government takes tax dollars of the American people just to give it to foreign people?
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If your reference is about missionaries, they don't give you money unless you convert.

I don't about money but that's not the case for the other forms of charity you receive. For example St. John and Red Cross. You don't have to convert when you receive aid from organizations such as Oxfam and Doctors without Borders.

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