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CanadianSingh

I Have Short Hair

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I am a Sikh, and I cut my hair. I understand about our hair, they are our roots of Sikhism, and when we cut the "roots" we lose generations, and I agree with that. Well, I just got a question, and its just that, will god get mad at me for cutting my hair?

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No, God won't get mad. He doesn't get mad because he's Nirgun (without attributes). If someone wants to assert that God can feel the emotion of anger, then they must also concede that God is capable of feeling all other emotions - happiness, sadness, despair, desire etc. Then they've just embarked upon a whole new ladder of ridiculousness.

People should stop treating Waheguru as though he were the highly unstable Yahweh of Biblical fame, who tells people what to do and what not to do and goes nuts all the time. The Almighty is more like a universal force. We should be wary of projecting all these anthropomorphisms onto him.

Edited by Balkaar
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Waheguru loves all their children.

If the icha, chahat (desire) is there then Maharaj ji will do kirpa (blessings).

Bhai Jugraj Singhs experience:

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Guest Jacfsing2

Vaheguru won't get mad, because he's an all-loving God, but don't try to exploit people. The best thing is not thinking about this Kesh issue too much and try to focus on doing Bani. I used to cut my hair as well, but focusing too much on Kesh will be a distraction to doing bani. (You'll know what's right and wrong).

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Canadian singh if you understand the importance of Kesh will you continue to cut it? You don't have to answer online just think about it.

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The Kesh is suppose to come naturally as an attribute. It's a sign of one abandoning a sense of duality and accepting whatever happens to the body. Equally important to this is that it is part of the Rehet. Like Balkaar said God is without Attribution. Jaap Sahib bani is a very good bani to read in terms of these sort of questions. About God and emotions.

You cut your hair, do you feel remorse? do you regret it? if so then refrain from it, it'll be a challenge but you can ease into it.

Strangely enough, I read earlier on that you were bullied for your looks? how have you kept Kesh since then but decided now to cut them.

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I am a Sikh, and I cut my hair. I understand about our hair, they are our roots of Sikhism, and when we cut the "roots" we lose generations, and I agree with that. Well, I just got a question, and its just that, will god get mad at me for cutting my hair?

I also have short hair not out of choice :blush2:

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I also have short hair not out of choice :blush2:

What do you mean veerji? Are you forced to cut it by somebody, or is it simply not very long?

Edited by Balkaar

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What do you mean veerji? Are you forced to cut it by somebody, or is it simply not very long?

haha, going bald in my old age!

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I'm the complete opposite. My hair has always been dangerously long. It's a blessing, but sometimes it can get in the way of things :p

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Guest Jacfsing2

I'm the complete opposite. My hair has always been dangerously long. It's a blessing, but sometimes it can get in the way of things :p

How long is your Kesh, Kira?

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How long is your Kesh, Kira?

Fairly long. Reaching my knees, I'm pretty tall. Never really measured it though.

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