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95% of Sikhs living stupid lifestyle?


dallysingh101
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The silliest thing about the modern obsession with bhangra is how stupid punjabis present it as if it is some sort of ancient tradition that has formed a central (perhaps THE central) part of their culture for generations.

In reality, only certain marginalized groups traditionally partook in dancing.

I remember when I was a kid, I asked my grandfather if people danced at his wedding reception. I wish you all could have seen the look he gave me.

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https://www.lbc.co.uk/news/drunken-naked-man-killed-father-bottle-champagne/

Drunken man 'killed father with bottle of Bollinger champagne' after 86-year-old 'found his secret booze stash'

19 January 2023, 19:56

Arjan Singh Vid, 86, was found on the floor of his son's bedroom with his "head caved in" surrounded by 100 bottles of champagne at the family home in Southgate, north London, in October 2021.

Deekan Singh Vig, who was naked at the time, allegedly said: "I killed my dad. I hit him over the head with a f***ing bloody bottle of Bollinger champagne.

"Oh shit. I killed my dad. He could have just died from a heart attack. I f***ing hit him with a bottle of f***ing Champagne...I hate French Champagne."

Deanna Heer KC told the court the victim had been hit repeatedly in the face and head with a full bottle of Champagne causing extensive injuries and almost immediate death.

She said the defendant accepted the killing and that his father had done nothing to justify the attack - but he did not mean to cause him really serious harm.

Vig had lived with his father, a qualified accountant, and mother Damanjit Vig, 85, in their four-bedroom detached home for about 40 years, the court was told.

On the evening of the killing, Vig's parents were watching TV when Mrs Vig heard vomiting noises from her son's room and he told her he had consumed half a bottle of whisky, jurors heard.

The last thing she saw was her husband comforting their son, the court heard.

She called her daughter because Vig appeared "out of control" and "drunk" and she in turn dialled 999, the prosecutor said.

An officer tried to pushed open the defendant's door and, looking through a gap, saw Mr Vig's head covered in blood, the court heard.

The defendant said he could not open the door, telling police: "You're too late. He's been dead for an hour."

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On 1/18/2023 at 6:00 AM, californiasardar1 said:

The silliest thing about the modern obsession with bhangra is how stupid punjabis present it as if it is some sort of ancient tradition that has formed a central (perhaps THE central) part of their culture for generations.

In reality, only certain marginalized groups traditionally partook in dancing.

I remember when I was a kid, I asked my grandfather if people danced at his wedding reception. I wish you all could have seen the look he gave me.

This is the crux of the matter, how did we get here. And I don't buy the bull5hit about others foisting it on us, we obviously have an appetite for this crap amongst our own that external AND internal forces are exploiting. 

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6 hours ago, dallysingh101 said:

This is the crux of the matter, how did we get here. And I don't buy the bull5hit about others foisting it on us, we obviously have an appetite for this crap amongst our own that external AND internal forces are exploiting. 

 

Aside from our people being (in general) stupid and pathetic, here is something to consider.

I am not the most knowledeable person when it comes to bhangra. But based on what I know, bhangra's popularity among diaspora Punjabis predates its popularity among people in Punjab. As we all know, people in Punjab desperately want to be "western," and they copy the trends they see among Punjabis who live abroad.

So the question then is: why did bhangra become popular among diaspora Punjabis? I think it has to do with the immigrant experience and a desire to have some sort of unifying cultural practices that are enjoyable and can help forge a sense of identity and belonging among minority people who spend most of their time feeling like they don't belong anywhere. Notice how bhangra is the first thing that comes up among most diaspora Punjabis when they seek to bond with each other, and it is the first thing that comes up when most diaspora Punjabis want to or need to provide some representation of their culture and heritage to non-Punjabi people.

What is puzzling is why people choose bhangra, given that it was not actually part of their cultural heritage. But I bet most Punjabis are completely unaware of this. Moreover, music and dancing are perhaps the most popular cultural practices retained by most immigrant groups (who tend to easily lose less "fun" and "colorful" aspects of their culture). Punjabis just copy.

I am not justifying the importance that diaspora Punjabis give to bhangra. I am just proposing a theory of how it became popular among them.

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11 minutes ago, californiasardar1 said:

 

Aside from our people being (in general) stupid and pathetic, here is something to consider.

I am not the most knowledeable person when it comes to bhangra. But based on what I know, bhangra's popularity among diaspora Punjabis predates its popularity among people in Punjab. As we all know, people in Punjab desperately want to be "western," and they copy the trends they see among Punjabis who live abroad.

So the question then is: why did bhangra become popular among diaspora Punjabis? I think it has to do with the immigrant experience and a desire to have some sort of unifying cultural practices that are enjoyable and can help forge a sense of identity and belonging among minority people who spend most of their time feeling like they don't belong anywhere. Notice how bhangra is the first thing that comes up among most diaspora Punjabis when they seek to bond with each other, and it is the first thing that comes up when most diaspora Punjabis want to or need to provide some representation of their culture and heritage to non-Punjabi people.

What is puzzling is why people choose bhangra, given that it was not actually part of their cultural heritage. But I bet most Punjabis are completely unaware of this. Moreover, music and dancing are perhaps the most popular cultural practices retained by most immigrant groups (who tend to easily lose less "fun" and "colorful" aspects of their culture). Punjabis just copy.

I am not justifying the importance that diaspora Punjabis give to bhangra. I am just proposing a theory of how it became popular among them.

I can talk with some authority on this because I witnessed it growing up (and I'm sure I've said this before so forgive the repetition).  

Bhangra bands and gigs became very popular with young british 'asians' in the 80s. At that time virulent open racism was a norm in society. It was a release and a perceived  relative safe space (which time has told us was an illusion......). All brown people jumped on it, not just Panjabis. Parents back then were often super strict.

Sadly, this is also where the negative reputation of apnay and apneean being drunk and 'easy' grew. Guys from other communities quickly started to exploit the vulnerable girls who'd be playing truant (and getting dressed up in the toilets at school) or creeping out of windows. 

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1 minute ago, dallysingh101 said:

I can talk with some authority on this because I witnessed it growing up (and I'm sure I've said this before so forgive the repetition).  

Bhangra bands and gigs became very popular with young british 'asians' in the 80s. At that time virulent open racism was a norm in society. It was a release and a relative safe space. All brown people jumped on it, not just Panjabis. Sadly, that's also where the negative reputation of apnay and apneean being drunk and 'easy' grew. Guys from other communities quickly started to exploit the vulnerable girls who'd be playing truant (and getting dressed up in the toilets at school) or creeping out of windows. 

 

There you go. This essentially confirms what I said: immigrant groups want something fun that will bring them together and also give them some sense of identity and make them reel like they belong somewhere. I am pretty sure that the popularity of bhangra trickled back to Punjab, and that's how it became popular among people there.

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3 minutes ago, californiasardar1 said:

 

There you go. This essentially confirms what I said: immigrant groups want something fun that will bring them together and also give them some sense of identity and make them reel like they belong somewhere. I am pretty sure that the popularity of bhangra trickled back to Punjab, and that's how it became popular among people there.

I think you're right. 

It's our people's fault for being so open to others that messed things up. If we did this discreetly amongst ourselves we could have avoided a lot of very serious problems. Hindsight.......

 

 

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On 1/18/2023 at 6:00 AM, californiasardar1 said:

 

In reality, only certain marginalized groups traditionally partook in dancing.

I remember when I was a kid, I asked my grandfather if people danced at his wedding reception. I wish you all could have seen the look he gave me.

And becoming a singer was considered shameful only a few generations ago.

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On 1/22/2023 at 8:42 AM, Premi5 said:

And becoming a singer was considered shameful only a few generations ago.

seriously we need to really push tanti saaj raag keertan instead of the low standard harmonium keertan we currently have. The current low standard keertan has birthed countless punjabi singers and producers in this lacharpuna industry such as Daler Mehndi, Mika Singh and RDB. Authentic keertan wouldn't result in gurdwaras being used as launchpads for such personalities!

 

I hope this truth goes into the brains of some sikhs!!!

On 1/18/2023 at 6:00 AM, californiasardar1 said:

The silliest thing about the modern obsession with bhangra is how stupid punjabis present it as if it is some sort of ancient tradition that has formed a central (perhaps THE central) part of their culture for generations.

In reality, only certain marginalized groups traditionally partook in dancing.

I remember when I was a kid, I asked my grandfather if people danced at his wedding reception. I wish you all could have seen the look he gave me.

Similarly, modern sikhs also try to present Morris Dancing gatka as an ancient art and even try to associate it with Guru Hargobind Sahib patshah, instead of learning authentic shastarvidiya!!!

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