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Washing kesh - need help

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I have questions about washing kesh.

As I am starting to practice for amrit, kesh ishnaan is a must.

Now I don't know about you but I really hate tying my dumalla on wet hair. It feels uncomfortable.

Is it possible to keep my kesh open while reading the bania in amritvella?

 

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I can think of two options 

1. Let your hair down & tie a loose patka while reading Gurbani.

2. Keep your Kesh open & listen to Gurbani on your device.

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5 hours ago, monatosingh said:

I have questions about washing kesh.

As I am starting to practice for amrit, kesh ishnaan is a must.

Now I don't know about you but I really hate tying my dumalla on wet hair. It feels uncomfortable.

Is it possible to keep my kesh open while reading the bania in amritvella?

 

It is generally thought that you should be fully ready (dastar tied) when reading from a Gutka Sahib. But some might think it OK to listen to Nitnem while your hair is loose (but covered).

You don't need to tie a full 6m or 12m dumalla to do paath. You could just tie a mal-mal (cotton) small turban (2m or so) while also intertwining it or another cloth with your kes. Once you've done your paath, you can remove your wet small turban and retie another dry one.

Finally, you need to cover your hair to maintain respect while reading Gurbani, but it's acceptable to recite the Gurmantar without a turban having been tied.

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18 hours ago, BhForce said:

It is generally thought that you should be fully ready (dastar tied) when reading from a Gutka Sahib. But some might think it OK to listen to Nitnem while your hair is loose (but covered).

You don't need to tie a full 6m or 12m dumalla to do paath. You could just tie a mal-mal (cotton) small turban (2m or so) while also intertwining it or another cloth with your kes. Once you've done your paath, you can remove your wet small turban and retie another dry one.

Finally, you need to cover your hair to maintain respect while reading Gurbani, but it's acceptable to recite the Gurmantar without a turban having been tied.

Is it ok to wear it around your waist, as that is what some people do?

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4 hours ago, monatosingh said:

Is it ok to wear it around your waist, as that is what some people do?

Well, that would be keeping the dastar on your person, but you still wouldn't be covered, which most people would agree you need to be to read Gurbani. It is presumed that you would be doing maybe an hour or so of Gurmanter recital, that should be enough time to evaporate the water out of your hair.

I know it seems like it's just a bunch of pesky rules, but if we don't make the effort to keep ourselves covered when reading Gurbani in the morning, on what basis will we say to people to keep your head covered in the Gurdwara?

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Excellent and commendable effort Singh Sahib!

I wouldn't advise reading from a Gutka with your hair open even if they are covered. 

You could do simran whilst the water evaporates from your kes infront of a heater. Then tie them and be ready to start your 5 bania. 

Or tie your kes wet in a parna whilst you do 5 bania and open after. 

If you know any of your nitnaym off by heart then you could dry your hair whilst reading off by heart - you'd still need to have your head covered

Point is that we should have extra satkar when reciting Gurbani from a tangible source. 

Think incrementally, if you are already doing your nitnaym without fail then start doing daily kesee isnaan. If not then maybe concentrate on doing your nitnaym without fail before committing to kesee isnaan.

Don't be too hard on yourself but dont but lazy either! One step towards SatGuroo and they'll many step towards you.

 

 

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I think its totally ok to have ur hair open but covered while doing gurbani. 

Just keep ur hair open and cover with a small dastaar like a chunni. 

But if u r going in mahraaj hazoori then u should be tyaar bar tyaar.

But its ok in my opinion to have ur hair open But covered while reading from gutka sahib.

Just make sure to go tie dumalla before doing ardaas. Cuz ardaas is when u pesh urself or go into presence of guruji to do beanti. Then u must be tyaar bar tyaar. 

Ive seen many gursikhs walking around doing paath with their hair open yet covered. You dont want to waste that time it takes u to 'green' ur hair by not.doing paath.

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Is there any proof that one must cover hair whilst reciting Gurbani kantth? I get it if you're reading from Pothi or Gutka Sahib. The reason for the question...

The aim is to recite naam athe pehar (24x7), this would mean for a high avastha individual rom rom, so even during kesi ishnaan and other worldly activities. Or is there a prescribed method for Nitnem?

 

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22 minutes ago, InderjitS said:

Is there any proof that one must cover hair whilst reciting Gurbani kantth? I get it if you're reading from Pothi or Gutka Sahib. The reason for the question...

The aim is to recite naam athe pehar (24x7), this would mean for a high avastha individual rom rom, so even during kesi ishnaan and other worldly activities. Or is there a prescribed method for Nitnem?

 

A lot of mahapurkhs used to do bhagti with kes open. Their avastha was much higher than ours. There were mahapurkhs who used to listen to gurbani 24/7 even while going to the washroom etc

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3 minutes ago, Singh123456777 said:

A lot of mahapurkhs used to do bhagti with kes open. Their avastha was much higher than ours. There were mahapurkhs who used to listen to gurbani 24/7 even while going to the washroom etc

So what is the answer to my question, you think its ok or not for us, as we're dung beetles comparing ourselves to Hawks? 

 

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3 hours ago, InderjitS said:

Is there any proof that one must cover hair whilst reciting Gurbani kantth? I get it if you're reading from Pothi or Gutka Sahib. The reason for the question...

The aim is to recite naam athe pehar (24x7), this would mean for a high avastha individual rom rom, so even during kesi ishnaan and other worldly activities. Or is there a prescribed method for Nitnem?

 

I think it's just something that's believed to be a common basic rule in the Panth.

Probably a rule that is passed down.

 

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