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Is Suicide ever acceptable in Sikhi?

My specific example would be during partition where father's were killing daughters/women were jumping into wells etc to save honour.

Or is suicide never acceptable? 

Thanks

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Singh you real need to read the English translations of Gurbani.  Your eyes will open up to what it is called to live.  Singhs around you don't live better lives.  Instead of watching t.v. YouTube and

I hear you brother. I stumbled upon these today while first doing sehajpath and reading rehrass sahib secondly. 

Vaheguru Ji Ka Khalsa, Vaheguru Ji ki Fateh. I've been there man. Whatever stress, desire, thought that motivates you is what needs to die. Kill the ego. Kill the mind. Kill temptation. Live

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20 minutes ago, Premi5 said:

Is Suicide ever acceptable in Sikhi?

I would say the argument would be between 

1) Never acceptable

2) Acceptable under extreme circumstances

but not

3) Acceptable whenever you feel like it.

#3 is what a lot of liberal people today are arguing for (you have the right to do whatever you want with your body).

I would say the reason you don't commit suicide is to stay in hukum (will of God). Also, if you think you can avoid punishment of karma by killing yourself, you are mistaken, because you'll get sent into another life to get the karma punishment again, plus more for having killed yourself.

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Baba Atal was not punished for nothing.  Only God can take and give life.  Always stay in hukam. 

What if God was doing that to them to cut their karams, then they committed suicide.  Or maybe God had planned to save them by a miracle.  They got another bad karam of suicide accumulated on their account.  

They should have fought until they died. Soora so pehchaniye jo karhe dheen ke het. Purja purja kut mare kabhu na shaadhe khet.

They left the khet.

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30 minutes ago, sikhni777 said:

Baba Atal was not punished for nothing.  Only God can take and give life.  Always stay in hukam. 

What if God was doing that to them to cut their karams, then they committed suicide.  Or maybe God had planned to save them by a miracle.  They got another bad karam of suicide accumulated on their account.  

They should have fought until they died. Soora so pehchaniye jo karhe dheen ke het. Purja purja kut mare kabhu na shaadhe khet.

They left the khet.

Waheguru 🙏🏽

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3 hours ago, Premi5 said:

Is Suicide ever acceptable in Sikhi?

My specific example would be during partition where father's were killing daughters/women were jumping into wells etc to save honour.

Or is suicide never acceptable? 

Thanks

From ultimate point of view, there is no free will , everything is pre-determined, without god's will not even leaf can move. With that being said, yes its good to have some sort of framework-maryada in regards to euthanasia and suicide on relative level.

Suicide is not sikh way, as sikh way is discriminating power-bibek which separates reality from illusion as  lets see what actually dies upon sucide- body dies, but mind that triggers suicidal thoughts, pushes one to brink of suicide still lives on assumes another body-next life based on desires, good and bad karams, suicidal thoughts residue left imprinted on mind. So clearly who is the culprit here and what really died? Body or mind? Sikhi suggest to kill the mind into ocean of gyan pure aware atma not body as mind is causing suffering.

Now going back to the example-

Quote

My specific example would be during partition where father's were killing daughters/women were jumping into wells etc to save honour.

Very different circumstances, its hard to impose what one should or shouldn't do when they are in crisis situation like this as one tends to follow their instinct at the end of day. But i will say- doing ardas infront of maharaj to have strength to fight back everything at the disposal would be the way  if i ever stuck in that kinda situation and besides there is practical reason we (men and women alike) are given kirpan to fight back injustice at any given time.

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During the armed struggle of the 90s some Singh's kept cyanide capsule's. These were consumed before capture. Makes sense if they were unable to endure torture without jeopardising future missions or giving away location of others. I do wonder if in these exceptional circumstances and like ones already described there is a level of forgiveness involved so they can return not as a pret but in human form.

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4 hours ago, N30S1NGH said:

From ultimate point of view, there is no free will , everything is pre-determined, without god's will not even leaf can move. With that being said, yes its good to have some sort of framework-maryada in regards to euthanasia and suicide on relative level.

Finally somebody understands this concept

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6 hours ago, lostconfussedsingh said:

I don't think sucide is wrong i would even do it myself but when i think of the pain i get put off it. 

 

I mean is it not best for one moment of pain to kill oneself then suffer everyday ?

 

If i knew i was diganosed with a disease illness and die a slow death i would go for euthanesia clinc in switerzland to get it over.

 

I mean why would anyone want to live in this crap world ? Look at the poor kids dying of starvation in africa. How can you call life beautiful ? Unless you are stupid

Here we go again

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13 minutes ago, S4NGH said:

Here we go again

I would be very VERY far from suicide if I had certain types of fantasies such as those which have been mentioned here before. The closest I've ever come is when I drank a bottle of Blonde Belgian Ale.

beer_2514.jpg.fa9a8362b35c6aafb3f9580f3f77b571.jpg

 

She's a beaut ain't she?

 

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21 minutes ago, MrDoaba said:

I would be very VERY far from suicide if I had certain types of fantasies such as those which have been mentioned here before. The closest I've ever come is when I drank a bottle of Blonde Belgian Ale.

beer_2514.jpg.fa9a8362b35c6aafb3f9580f3f77b571.jpg

 

She's a beaut ain't she?

 

LMFAO 😂😂😂 savage!! 

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2 minutes ago, lostconfussedsingh said:

You can't hurt me lol

Lolll brother I'm glad we can make a joke about it!

Maharaaj Kirpa.

But cut out the suicide stuff yaar. Je gal karni ah PM kar la.

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