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Guest jigsaw_puzzled_singh

very Random Historical Photographs

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On 5/3/2019 at 7:49 PM, puzzled said:

Sikh woman 1870s     it looks like a completely different world 

 

1870s.jpg

same lady as this one

P-15+thumbnail.jpg?format=1500w

 

I guess this is probably how my great great great grandmother would have looked like.

Maybe this will come back in fashion with my great great great grandaughter 😂😂

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On 4/28/2019 at 10:15 PM, puzzled said:

photo from 1904  outside akal takht. I like how the lady is leaning in to look at the camera lol  looks so curious 

 

53323532_194462308179746_5594186152109386585_n.jpg

These are the current day bazurgs babeh and bibian. Wish they could come back and give their pautheh some shithar! !

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1 hour ago, Ranjeet01 said:

I guess this is probably how my great great great grandmother would have looked like.

Maybe this will come back in fashion with my great great great grandaughter 😂😂

LMAO  It looks like such a far away world   looks similar to how the rajasthani women dress. 

Even the singhs from that era are dressed really differently 

Singhs from the 1850s 

 

a7177f4f26f35cc7fc32e5b1301a8cec.png

1850s.jpg.02e473fedb9af1cad71f5b761148f3a3.jpg

Edited by puzzled

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Current indian fashion is influenced by Bollywood     I think sherwanis look disgusting     they look ugly   

When I get married I ain't gnna wear that sh1t    

I think the above people from the puratan pics look so much better. 

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1 hour ago, Ranjeet01 said:

These are the current day bazurgs babeh and bibian. Wish they could come back and give their pautheh some shithar! !

It's gd that that generation has passed away  they had izzat and sharam 

They would of been lost in these shameless times, imagine them seeing the current state of the sikhs.

 

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Guest jigsaw_puzzled_singh
27 minutes ago, puzzled said:

It's gd that that generation has passed away  they had izzat and sharam 

They would of been lost in these shameless times, imagine them seeing the current state of the sikhs.

 

This generation of Sikhs is probably the best there has ever been. Some in the  generation of the 10th master, even with his physical presence in front of their very eyes, abandoned him. Previous generations prayed at ancestor shrines, took opium like it was going out of fashion, drank till they dropped and gambled their family's fortune away playing cards under the pippal tree in the centre of the village, to mention just a few examples. This generation are saints compared to what was before. Emotions always make people think yesteryear was more moral than the present but the intellect must always be used to question those emotions. The truth is that things were never quite as good as your emotions would like you to believe.

 

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There's an account of a Sikh coming to Dasme Paatshah's darbaar for help when his missus ran off with a Muslim neighbour, lol. 

I agree, generally, there has been a gradual degradation in morals and principles over the centuries, but even in the times of our Guru Sahibs it wasn't a virtual Satyug. Some pretty dank and nasty stuff was going down in the pinds behind closed doors. Most people weren't preparing to ascend to the astral plane just because Guru Sahibs were in existence. 😁

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25 minutes ago, MisterrSingh said:

There's an account of a Sikh coming to Dasme Paatshah's darbaar for help when his missus ran off with a Muslim neighbour, lol.

Lol they've been doing it since the 18th century LMAO     joke! 

But yeah people in general had more morals and sharam in those days. Izzat was a big thing and governed society.  

Every couple of years there is a big change in culture and it seems to be getting more and more degrading.

It's becoming more and more acceptable for pubjabi women to drink now, about a decade back that wouldn't of been  allowed. 

Live in relationships before marriage are becoming a thing   etc 

But even in the old days they had serious issues. Baby girls were killed after they were born. My mum told me how her chachas father (shareeka)  killed 4 baby girls! His grand daughters!  His sons wife kept on giving birth to daughters and he just used kill them and burry them!  Absolutely disgusting. 

My mum said he had an absolutely horrific death. He developed a illness where his flesh was rotting and when on his deathbed he needed to be constantly turned over because his skin was in pain because it was rotting away but no one would turn him and he would scream for hours.    Waheguru. 

There's another story from my nanke where and young man and woman fell in love, in those days that wasn't allowed to the panchyaat and sirpench decided to punish the young man so his face was painted black and he was sat on a donkey and taken around the pind, they put bells around his neck.  The same day he committed suicide by jumping into a well. The girl got married off in a very far away pind. The girl was from the same gali as my nanke. 

Iv heard many horrific stories from the old pinds.   

 

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On 5/1/2019 at 5:15 PM, dallysingh101 said:

DzVOR9SXQAUzJvx.jpg

How comes these guys were still using the true Khalsa standard at this time? How did the community come to universally accept the modern version over this? 

Did goray do the standard flag change thing they do in places they've conquered? 

i cant make out the standard.  can anyone provide a link of what the standard looked like?

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Guest jigsaw_puzzled_singh

Now something extremely random:

Suresh Singh's multi-coloured woolen tank top. 

Anyone that's been visiting Brick lane in the East End would not have failed to notice the house with the red door....the one that a Sikh family lives in. The same family has been living there since the 1950s. Read an article about the current resident, the son of the original Singh there, and the tank top his mother made. Absolutely enjoyed immensely this piece coming up, not only for the lovely way that Suresh describes things but also because I remember my own grandmother knitted me one exactly the same as Suresh's. I wish I had treasured, loved and honoured it like Suresh has. Enjoy this next piece, it's beautifully written:

L1000040.jpg

Suresh Singh has been wearing this tank top since 1973

Perhaps everyone has a favourite piece of clothing they have worn for years? I always admired Suresh Singh’s jazzy tank top and I was astonished when he told me he has been wearing it for nearly half a century.

Suresh’s father Joginder Singh came to London from the Punjab in 1949 and the Singh family have lived at 38 Princelet St longer than any other family in Spitalfields.

In our age of disposable fashion, the story of Suresh’s treasured tank top is an inspiring example of how a well made garment can be cherished for a lifetime.

“My mum made this tank top for me in 1973 when I was eleven. She had friends who all knitted and they had bits of wool left over – what you would call ‘cabbage’ -  so mum collected all these balls of different coloured wool. Otherwise, they would have been chucked away. She kept them in her carrier bag with her needles that she bought at Woolworths in Aldgate East. They were number ten needles.

Mum said to me, ‘Suresh, I’m going to knit you a tank top.’ I never asked her because dad had taught me that I should always be patient, but I think mum saw the twinkle in my eyes and she knew I wanted one. I had asthma, so it was to keep my chest warm. She knitted it over the winter, from November to January. Mum never had the spare time to spend all day long knitting, she had to do it in bits as she went along and keep putting it away.

Mum did not follow a pattern, she just looked at me and sometimes took measurements. It started getting really huge, so I said, ‘Mum, it’s going to be too big.’ She had a sense of scale, she did not draw round me and cut a pattern. Mum never did that. She replied, ‘You’ll grow into it.’ The idea was you would slowly grow into new clothes.

When my tank top was finished, it hung down to my knees and the armholes were at my waist, but Mum was adamant I would grow into it. I loved it because it was all the rainbow colours. There was red, then yellow, then black, then pink and that really beautiful green. It was so outrageous. No other Punjabi kid had one like it. They all wore Marks & Spencer or John Collier grey nylon jumpers, but I had this piece of art. To me, it was a masterpiece. It was so beautifully made, it was mum’s pride and joy. When I wore it, people would exclaim, ‘That tank top, mate, it’s classic!’ I would say, ‘Yeah, my mum made it.’ Sometimes, because it was too big, I could pull it up and tie it in a knot at the front.

Mum made it with such love that I have always kept it. Eventually, my children wore it, but I am claiming it these days. It is a one-off. What made the tank top special for mum was that she was making it for her son. People often say it is a work of art but mum never went to art school. She picked up the tradition of making something for your child. She put so much love into it and I wear it today and it is still really nice. It gives me comfort and it keeps my chest warm.

It has got swag, you know what I mean?

It fits me now.”

MS275.jpg

Suresh and his mum at 38 Princelet St

MS276.jpg

Suresh Singh aged four

20180613_Spitalfields_Life_38PrinceletSt_Exterior_038_PatriciaNiven.jpg

Suresh Singh & Jagir Kaur at 38 Princelet St last summer 

MS360.jpg

Suresh's dad

MS310.jpg

Joginder Singh in the kitchen at 38 Princelet St – “I think it is funny but also sad that Dad would do that. Why did he put his pyjamas on and become like a proper Punjabi in the house, but dress in a suit before he went out?”

6.jpg

Suresh Singh in his East End yard, 1960s

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On 5/10/2019 at 4:40 PM, Guest jigsaw_puzzled_singh said:

Now something extremely random:

Suresh Singh's multi-coloured woolen tank top. 

Anyone that's been visiting Brick lane in the East End would not have failed to notice the house with the red door....the one that a Sikh family lives in. The same family has been living there since the 1950s. Read an article about the current resident, the son of the original Singh there, and the tank top his mother made. Absolutely enjoyed immensely this piece coming up, not only for the lovely way that Suresh describes things but also because I remember my own grandmother knitted me one exactly the same as Suresh's. I wish I had treasured, loved and honoured it like Suresh has. Enjoy this next piece, it's beautifully written:

L1000040.jpg

Suresh Singh has been wearing this tank top since 1973

Perhaps everyone has a favourite piece of clothing they have worn for years? I always admired Suresh Singh’s jazzy tank top and I was astonished when he told me he has been wearing it for nearly half a century.

Suresh’s father Joginder Singh came to London from the Punjab in 1949 and the Singh family have lived at 38 Princelet St longer than any other family in Spitalfields.

In our age of disposable fashion, the story of Suresh’s treasured tank top is an inspiring example of how a well made garment can be cherished for a lifetime.

“My mum made this tank top for me in 1973 when I was eleven. She had friends who all knitted and they had bits of wool left over – what you would call ‘cabbage’ -  so mum collected all these balls of different coloured wool. Otherwise, they would have been chucked away. She kept them in her carrier bag with her needles that she bought at Woolworths in Aldgate East. They were number ten needles.

Mum said to me, ‘Suresh, I’m going to knit you a tank top.’ I never asked her because dad had taught me that I should always be patient, but I think mum saw the twinkle in my eyes and she knew I wanted one. I had asthma, so it was to keep my chest warm. She knitted it over the winter, from November to January. Mum never had the spare time to spend all day long knitting, she had to do it in bits as she went along and keep putting it away.

Mum did not follow a pattern, she just looked at me and sometimes took measurements. It started getting really huge, so I said, ‘Mum, it’s going to be too big.’ She had a sense of scale, she did not draw round me and cut a pattern. Mum never did that. She replied, ‘You’ll grow into it.’ The idea was you would slowly grow into new clothes.

When my tank top was finished, it hung down to my knees and the armholes were at my waist, but Mum was adamant I would grow into it. I loved it because it was all the rainbow colours. There was red, then yellow, then black, then pink and that really beautiful green. It was so outrageous. No other Punjabi kid had one like it. They all wore Marks & Spencer or John Collier grey nylon jumpers, but I had this piece of art. To me, it was a masterpiece. It was so beautifully made, it was mum’s pride and joy. When I wore it, people would exclaim, ‘That tank top, mate, it’s classic!’ I would say, ‘Yeah, my mum made it.’ Sometimes, because it was too big, I could pull it up and tie it in a knot at the front.

Mum made it with such love that I have always kept it. Eventually, my children wore it, but I am claiming it these days. It is a one-off. What made the tank top special for mum was that she was making it for her son. People often say it is a work of art but mum never went to art school. She picked up the tradition of making something for your child. She put so much love into it and I wear it today and it is still really nice. It gives me comfort and it keeps my chest warm.

It has got swag, you know what I mean?

It fits me now.”

MS275.jpg

Suresh and his mum at 38 Princelet St

MS276.jpg

Suresh Singh aged four

20180613_Spitalfields_Life_38PrinceletSt_Exterior_038_PatriciaNiven.jpg

Suresh Singh & Jagir Kaur at 38 Princelet St last summer 

MS360.jpg

Suresh's dad

MS310.jpg

Joginder Singh in the kitchen at 38 Princelet St – “I think it is funny but also sad that Dad would do that. Why did he put his pyjamas on and become like a proper Punjabi in the house, but dress in a suit before he went out?”

6.jpg

Suresh Singh in his East End yard, 1960s

My mum knitted me a tank top when I was a kid,  though it wasn't multi-coloured.

It was red with these blue patterns.

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Guest jigsaw_puzzled_singh

Off the scale randomness now:

So....I remember constantly trying to tell my grandfather that there was no need to shout on the phone......whoever it was he was talking to could hear him perfectly well if he talked normally and he wouldn't have to raise his voice accordingly depending on whether he was talking to a person down the road or in Vancouver. And then I remember going to Punjab when I was little and getting a phone in the house was a brand new and exciting concept. People - older people - struggled with it. I remember, at the time, thinking it must be a 3rd world poorly educated thing. But now, I look back at the oldies that struggled with the concept and know they were the clever ones. They're the ones that learned the hard way without any instructions or educational promotions. The 'western world' was never as clever. They so dumb I wonder sometimes how they manage to put their pants on without help. Here's some examples of how the western world learned how to use a telephone:

image.png.3ec0434b3cf97d815e0d001e1f109d98.png

image.png.32dbc6100e53d7778dae251e807cef9f.png

image.png.c4ef7872fbdddfad42ab43eab753ae17.png

image.png.659a7d4e8f603bea2fa4b9b8204deedf.png

image.png.92ca1f622d9c859b5b85ee709d38d516.png

image.png.9de3f62604933f6cdb517eafc455acda.png

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Guest jigsaw_puzzled_singh

This one's a wee bit interesting...especially with the whole 'to meat or not to meat' debate. One of the photos released recently by the Canadian photographer Charles Girdwood embedded with the British Army during world war 1 show Sikh soldiers performing jhatka on a goat:

image.png.9716e35a3bd700a180f44f83ae84b8b4.png

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On 4/25/2019 at 2:53 PM, Guest Kunta Kinte said:

Please show us the kera and kanga. You can circle or use arrows. i don't see it. Perhaps I missed it I'm not sure. Please point these 2 items out.

guy on left wearing his karda on right wrist , look for shiny line halfway up his arm

singh with shirt is wearing his karda on his left wrist clearly visible

third Singh on right is also wearing his karda on his Left wrist .

I have three sons and  they all have beards just on their chins like these guys they are not hairy because neither myself nor my husband are overly hairy BTW they are comparable ages 20, 20, 22.

Out of my cousins and uncles  all had similar growth pattern to their beards chin first tufts , then longer sideburns  , then the join up .

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