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Can Spirits/Relatives come back to you after they die?


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WJKK WJKF

 

Can spirits come back and see you after they have died? Reason why is I had a relative who said they have seen their bibi who died a few years back. They went to India and in her Bibi's room an object fell which was on a table and then they felt a poke in their back like their bibi used to do to them. This was at night and no one else around.

 

Dont spirits go to get judged and sent to heaven/hell/Sachkand/ Chaurasi lakh after they die or do they stay on earth for a while, or can they come back from where there gone? If a spirit has gone to another state, can it come back in its previous state?

 

 

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If a persons mind is on their house at point of death, they will return as a ghost within that house. 

 

ant kal jo mandre simrae aisee chinta mai jai marae 

Pret jaun val val authere

 

Sggsji Ang 526 bhagat trilochan 

 

Why do you think haunted houses are such a spoken about concept around the world? 

If a person dies in such thought, jam dhooth the messenger of death will come to collect them and take them to the court of dharam rai. There they will be judged and sentenced according to their deeds, which would include incarnation as a ghost for the above person who died thinking of their house. This may be in addition to punishment in hell for their other deeds, or even a period in heaven.

The persons existence as a ghost will typically last a long time, but not necessarily for ever. Once their debt has been paid, jam dhooth will come back down and take them to wherever dharam rai has ordered.

I would recommend reading unditthi duniya (unseen world) by Bhai Randhir Singh. 

 

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My Nani used to see one of our ancestors.  It was  a Singh wearing white chola and dastar and had a kirpan.  When she was close to passing away she saw more and more of him. she said he used to walk through our courtyard and didnt say anything, no one else saw him. 

 

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17 hours ago, puzzled said:

My Nani used to see one of our ancestors.  It was  a Singh wearing white chola and dastar and had a kirpan.  When she was close to passing away she saw more and more of him. she said he used to walk through our courtyard and didnt say anything, no one else saw him. 

 

This sounds more like a Shaheed Singh rather than a ghost.

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23 hours ago, SikhSeeker said:

WJKK WJKF

 

Can spirits come back and see you after they have died? Reason why is I had a relative who said they have seen their bibi who died a few years back. They went to India and in her Bibi's room an object fell which was on a table and then they felt a poke in their back like their bibi used to do to them. This was at night and no one else around.

 

Dont spirits go to get judged and sent to heaven/hell/Sachkand/ Chaurasi lakh after they die or do they stay on earth for a while, or can they come back from where there gone? If a spirit has gone to another state, can it come back in its previous state?

 

 

Search this forum for Suleman the ghost on this forum and on Google. This will give you more insight into this type of thing. 

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1 hour ago, ssinghuk said:

This sounds more like a Shaheed Singh rather than a ghost.

Is it    I'm not sure.  She saw him since she got married into my nanke family in the early 50s   and saw him throughout her life.  My nani was amritdhari   and did a lot of sewa at the pind da gurdwara.     She some how knew it was one of our ancestors,  not sure how she knew.     He would wear white chola and dastar   he had a long white dhari.  

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