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Surrey spinner Amar Virdi on the brink of becoming third Sikh to represent England


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20 minutes ago, ChardikalaUK said:

In England spinners are not guaranteed a spot in the team, the conditions are more suited to fast bowlers, especially those who can swing the ball.

Cricket is already considered quite unathletic to most sports and the fact that not many Indians or Sikhs have not done well in fast bowling just makes us look weak.

there r so many UK born pakistanI kids in county cricket but just couple of Sikhs. why so ?

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Yes, and the pakistanis are usually of lower class economically, so more inclined to push their kids to cricket .   Sikhs in England more likely in future to emerge from private school system a

Only slightly. Football is king, can be played in all weather conditions, is a simple game and much more 'trendy' Cricket is even behind rugby in popularity in the upper-middle class typess

Allah will punish them! sorry for my bad jokes!

8 minutes ago, shastarSingh said:

there r so many UK born pakistanI kids in county cricket but just couple of Sikhs. why so ?

First of all their population is bigger than ours and they are more cricket obsessed. I would say that Sikhs are less obssessed about cricket compared to Hindus and Muslims. Even in Punjab you don't see that many apne play it, which makes the fact that Sikh cricketers have done so well even more impressive.

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3 minutes ago, ChardikalaUK said:

Even in Punjab you don't see that many apne play it, which makes the fact that Sikh cricketers have done so well even more impressive.

In Ludhiana cricket is no.1 sport and school level cricket is full of sardaar boys with joorra.

May be sikh parents don't see sport as a career option and want their kids to be doctors/engineers.

I feel Gurdwara Sahib shud give some financial award to sikh kids who excel in sports.

I know a local young cricket coach in Ludhiana who went for talent hunt in nearby villages and was amazed to see the talent. He found a 16 year old boy  bowler hitting 140 km/hr.

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We should be encouraging our boys (and girls) to be batsman - they get much more glory.

who cares about bowling 140km/hr if you are making big scores?

 

i see it somewhat like the way army uses the working class in England - most bowlers are more lower middle:working class.

batsman usually middle-upper class . Similarly in India with likes of Navjot Sidhu

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30 minutes ago, ChardikalaUK said:

First of all their population is bigger than ours and they are more cricket obsessed. I would say that Sikhs are less obssessed about cricket compared to Hindus and Muslims. Even in Punjab you don't see that many apne play it, which makes the fact that Sikh cricketers have done so well even more impressive.

Yes, and the pakistanis are usually of lower class economically, so more inclined to push their kids to cricket .
 

Sikhs in England more likely in future to emerge from private school system as around 1/3-1/2 English cricketers privately educated 

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1 hour ago, ChardikalaUK said:

In England spinners are not guaranteed a spot in the team, the conditions are more suited to fast bowlers, especially those who can swing the ball.

Cricket is already considered quite unathletic to most sports and the fact that not many Indians or Sikhs have not done well in fast bowling just makes us look weak.

So the real issue , since football is a lot more popular is why so few Sikhs have made it professionally 

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3 minutes ago, Premi5 said:

So the real issue , since football is a lot more popular is why so few Sikhs have made it professionally 

Because we don't think of sports as a serious career. It's not a bad way of thinking when you think about it. How many people actually make it as a professional athlete? Very few. It's better to have lots of educated Sikh professionals instead of masses of uneducated people some of whom are good at sports.

At the end if the day they are just games, nothing more. 

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2 minutes ago, ChardikalaUK said:

Because we don't think of sports as a serious career. It's not a bad way of thinking when you think about it. How many people actually make it as a professional athlete? Very few. It's better to have lots of educated Sikh professionals instead of masses of uneducated people some of whom are good at sports.

At the end if the day they are just games, nothing more. 

A lot of cricketers complete degrees whilst early in career or only start their cricket career professionally after they have played for their Uni cricket team, e.g Monty Panesar.

Ravi Bopara is an example of a more working class cricketer who didn’t go to uni

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There's a lot more emphasis on football compared to cricket from my experience.The KFF tournaments were very popular when I was growing up. Good memories going around the country with your team mates.

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8 minutes ago, Loombdi said:

There's a lot more emphasis on football compared to cricket from my experience.The KFF tournaments were very popular when I was growing up. Good memories going around the country with your team mates.

Allah likes cricket more than football.

Those who leave cricket and play football r kafirs and will pay a big price.

jokes!

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4 minutes ago, Loombdi said:

There's a lot more emphasis on football compared to cricket from my experience.The KFF tournaments were very popular when I was growing up. Good memories going around the country with your team mates.

Yeah, Sikhs are much more into football than cricket. 

In the wider UK public cricket has a negative image. It's considered slow, boring, takes too long to complete and doesn't require the most athleticism.

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5 minutes ago, ChardikalaUK said:

Yeah, Sikhs are much more into football than cricket. 

In the wider UK public cricket has a negative image. It's considered slow, boring, takes too long to complete and doesn't require the most athleticism.

present day professional cricketers hv gr8 athleticism. T20 cricket is short and very popular and present day cricketers earn lots of money.

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5 minutes ago, ChardikalaUK said:

Yeah, Sikhs are much more into football than cricket. 

In the wider UK public cricket has a negative image. It's considered slow, boring, takes too long to complete and doesn't require the most athleticism.

Yes very true but I feel that's changing slightly. You get the "Barmy Army" with the Laddish behaviour and boozing. With winning the world cup more people are interested in it.

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10 minutes ago, Loombdi said:

Yes very true but I feel that's changing slightly. You get the "Barmy Army" with the Laddish behaviour and boozing. With winning the world cup more people are interested in it.

Only slightly. Football is king, can be played in all weather conditions, is a simple game and much more 'trendy'

Cricket is even behind rugby in popularity in the upper-middle class typess

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43 minutes ago, shastarSingh said:

present day professional cricketers hv gr8 athleticism. T20 cricket is short and very popular and present day cricketers earn lots of money.

Yes compared to the cricketers from the 90s, but still nowhere near the fitness or athleticism of football, rugby, basketball players. There are still fat cricketers around. T20 still takes over 3 hours to complete.

Furthermore most English fans don't even take ODI or T20s seriously. They prefer test cricket by far. There weren't even that many celebrations when England won the World Cup last year.

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