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dallysingh101

Missing Sikh women in East London - keep eyes open

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5 hours ago, puzzled said:

Lol say it   No one is biting their tongue about this case lmao   

 

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1 hour ago, puzzled said:

Do you think its possible where westernized, liberal individuals the sort that get posted about on here, would ever see value in Sikh traditions and practices? and somehow   revert 

In most cases once you go western/liberal then there is not going back! 

Our ancestors kept some rehits which protected them from dissolving and assimilating with non-Sikhs. Some of these rehits are no longer practiced and we can see the results

In the coming decades I think Sikhism in the West will be only followed by those who are part of a group, sampradah, jatha. Mainstream Sikhs are dissolving and assimilating into westernism. Already we are seeing how manmat like homosexuality, inter religious marriages are being accepted by the new generation of mainstream Sikhs.

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Honestly when I first read of her disappearing a few days back on facebook sikh channel page, I thought she too was a victim of those grooming gangs

although she sound like "princess" of a rich dad because she was in news everywhere and i think they just don't advert missing people like that in media for free. its $$$$ , isn't it ?

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13 minutes ago, Jonny101 said:

Our ancestors kept some rehits which protected them from dissolving and assimilating with non-Sikhs. Some of these rehits are no longer practiced and we can see the results

In the coming decades I think Sikhism in the West will be only followed by those who are part of a group, sampradah, jatha. Mainstream Sikhs are dissolving and assimilating into westernism. Already we are seeing how manmat like homosexuality, inter religious marriages are being accepted by the new generation of mainstream Sikhs.

Somewhere along the way we've allowed a certain mentality to creep in which implies that "anything and everything is permissable" in Sikhi. At the same time, an opposing idea that a Sikh who rallies against this mentality; who wishes to adhere to a framework of belief and edicts is labelled as orthodox or extreme has also taken hold. Basically, following rules is intolerant, oppressive, and ungodly, whereas just "being" is godly. It's the same pattern that's beginning to tear at the fabric of humanity across the globe. So in that sense we aren't alone. But in our unique situation, it's our duty to provide solutions to these problems that originate outside of religious circles.

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20 minutes ago, Jonny101 said:

Our ancestors kept some rehits which protected them from dissolving and assimilating with non-Sikhs. Some of these rehits are no longer practiced and we can see the results

In the coming decades I think Sikhism in the West will be only followed by those who are part of a group, sampradah, jatha. Mainstream Sikhs are dissolving and assimilating into westernism. Already we are seeing how manmat like homosexuality, inter religious marriages are being accepted by the new generation of mainstream Sikhs.

Yeah i feel to understand and practice Sikhi you need a understanding of basic traditional values and morals and live by them. I really feel if your outlook and and upbringing is western like many Punjabis these days then they really won't get Sikhi, without those traditional values they won't find Sikhi appealing. Things like lowering your gaze when walking past a female, how is someone with a westernized liberal upbringing supposed to understand things like that?

Yeah thats what i mean, as apocalyptic as is may sound i really do think cultural Sikhs or mainstream as you described it really will assimilate into the local people, and the reason i believe that is because its happening!

One of my many reasons of getting into Sikhi was i looked at the state of my cousins and their offspring and thought to myself that Sikhi really is over for them! i thought i need to get into it otherwise it really would be the end of Sikhi in my family lineage!  My cousins kids are even less interested and clueless than my cousins are. In my entire family from all my cousins and there is over 30 of us, i am the only one who keeps my kes and practices as much as i can!  their kids don't even know how to speak Punjabi let alone read bani. My cousin sister came over from Canada and her health is on and off and my mum said to her that she should read mool mantar and her response was "whats that" !!   this is the state of them.

I worked with a Punjabi female in her early 20s, her family are from Singapore and she told me she drinks alcohol with her mum! how is someone who has been raised in a way where its normal to drink with your mum supposed to even remotely find Sikhi appealing? 

Thats what i mean once your outlook is liberal and westernized like the vast majority of Punjabis today, Sikhi will not be appealing to them at all. 

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3 hours ago, puzzled said:

 

In most cases once you go western/liberal then there is not going back! 

That's if you are a pu55y sheep panchoda. Not everyone is. 

 

Thankfully.

 

At worst we'll have a culling of our weak links. That'll make us stronger.

 

Have some shardhaa for your own sakes......

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1 hour ago, Jonny101 said:

In the coming decades I think Sikhism in the West will be only followed by those who are part of a group, sampradah, jatha. Mainstream Sikhs are dissolving and assimilating into westernism. Already we are seeing how manmat like homosexuality, inter religious marriages are being accepted by the new generation of mainstream Sikhs.

You hit the nail on the head! 'Sikhism' that 'mainstream' colonial repressed, sycophantic construct pandering to illiterate casteists will not survive. That Waheguru for that!

 

Sikhi ain't going nowhere but from strength to strength. 

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3 hours ago, MisterrSingh said:

 

 Yes you shouldn’t say it....  not even meant to be gossiping 

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2 hours ago, puzzled said:

Yeah i feel to understand and practice Sikhi you need a understanding of basic traditional values and morals and live by them. I really feel if your outlook and and upbringing is western like many Punjabis these days then they really won't get Sikhi, without those traditional values they won't find Sikhi appealing. Things like lowering your gaze when walking past a female, how is someone with a westernized liberal upbringing supposed to understand things like that?

Yeah thats what i mean, as apocalyptic as is may sound i really do think cultural Sikhs or mainstream as you described it really will assimilate into the local people, and the reason i believe that is because its happening!

One of my many reasons of getting into Sikhi was i looked at the state of my cousins and their offspring and thought to myself that Sikhi really is over for them! i thought i need to get into it otherwise it really would be the end of Sikhi in my family lineage!  My cousins kids are even less interested and clueless than my cousins are. In my entire family from all my cousins and there is over 30 of us, i am the only one who keeps my kes and practices as much as i can!  their kids don't even know how to speak Punjabi let alone read bani. My cousin sister came over from Canada and her health is on and off and my mum said to her that she should read mool mantar and her response was "whats that" !!   this is the state of them.

I worked with a Punjabi female in her early 20s, her family are from Singapore and she told me she drinks alcohol with her mum! how is someone who has been raised in a way where its normal to drink with your mum supposed to even remotely find Sikhi appealing? 

Thats what i mean once your outlook is liberal and westernized like the vast majority of Punjabis today, Sikhi will not be appealing to them at all. 

Without sounding offensive, I think you see things black and white- you need to stop that. People are generally as lucky as their past deeds. Not everyone has the kirpa that you have fortunately got.

Some of the most unreligious people can become the purest later or in the end.

Stop judging everyone. I’m not from a amritdhari back ground and I can a lot of people who wake up and suddenly have been blessed with seeing things differently and those people tend to end up stop with all the judging gossiping and actually change unlike some people who have been born into a more sikh way.

 

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4 minutes ago, learningkaur said:

Without sounding offensive, I think you see things black and white- you need to stop that. People are generally as lucky as their past deeds. Not everyone has the kirpa that you have fortunately got.

Some of the most unreligious people can become the purest later or in the end.

Stop judging everyone. I’m not from a amritdhari back ground and I can a lot of people who wake up and suddenly have been blessed with seeing things differently and those people tend to end up stop with all the judging gossiping and actually change unlike some people who have been born into a more sikh way.

It depends on that pivotal turning point that causes somebody to "wake up."

Where does a person draw the line? Would any guy accept a girl who was -- let me think of an extreme situation (forgive me 😅) -- who'd spent her formative years partaking in sexually degenerate behaviour, culminating in being gangbanged -- but realised the error of her ways, and decided to find a respectable, low-key Singh to marry, partially in the belief that his "goodness" would provide reflect favourably upon her by keeping her own flittering conscience at bay, but also prevent others from viewing her in negative terms. Conflicting motivations yet ultimately she wanted to turn over a new leaf, and begin afresh, but without telling her partner about her past.

Why does the burden of acceptance fall on the person who's in the process of being deceived? What would be the ultimate act that nobody should ever have to accept no matter how contrite the other party is, or how strongly the formerly irreligious has "seen the light." Is there a limit? Who decides?

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8 minutes ago, MisterrSingh said:

It depends on that pivotal turning point that causes somebody to "wake up."

Where does a person draw the line? Would any guy accept a girl who was -- let me think of an extreme situation (forgive me 😅) -- who'd spent her formative years partaking in sexually degenerate behaviour, culminating in being gangbanged -- but realised the error of her ways, and decided to find a respectable, low-key Singh to marry, partially in the belief that his "goodness" would provide reflect favourably upon her by keeping her own flittering conscience at bay, but also prevent others from viewing her in negative terms. Conflicting motivations yet ultimately she wanted to turn over a new leaf, and begin afresh, but without telling her partner about her past.

Why does the burden of acceptance fall on the person who's in the process of being deceived? What would be the ultimate act that nobody should ever have to accept no matter how contrite the other party is, or how strongly the formerly irreligious has "seen the light." Is there a limit? Who decides?

So I was referring to the last thing he said about he’s seen a mother drink with her daughter. I can think of a pair like that who completely changed.

I wasn’t thinking to the extremeness of your example. There are psychological reasons why some girls are so crazy, generally tends to be due to a lack of attention or love from their parents, normally those silly families which favour the sons over their daughters. Hence what I mean by looking at everything black and white.

In regards to the example you used about the poor singh- there seems to be a lot of talking about this woman did that that woman did that. You guys need to remember and acknowledge that sometimes or a lot of the times it’s actually the poor woman who had to accept a changed ex kanj*r gross masturbating porn watching man. Read about enough singhs on here with masturbation problems.

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Also regarding changing and becoming pure - an example is jagraj singh from basics of sikhi. He drank did it all and look at him after. It doesn’t matters what he did, it’s not a line for any of us to decide on, only Waheguru can decide where the line is. 

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2 hours ago, dallysingh101 said:

That's if you are a pu55y sheep panchoda. Not everyone is. 

 

Thankfully.

 

At worst we'll have a culling of our weak links. That'll make us stronger.

 

Have some shardhaa for your own sakes......

lol not quite sure how to reach to that little emotional outburst    

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46 minutes ago, learningkaur said:

Without sounding offensive, I think you see things black and white- you need to stop that. People are generally as lucky as their past deeds. Not everyone has the kirpa that you have fortunately got.

Some of the most unreligious people can become the purest later or in the end.

Stop judging everyone. I’m not from a amritdhari back ground and I can a lot of people who wake up and suddenly have been blessed with seeing things differently and those people tend to end up stop with all the judging gossiping and actually change unlike some people who have been born into a more sikh way.

 

I don't understand what is so judgmental about what i said? 

Just said to understand Sikhi you need some traditional values and boundaries. Being raised in an environment where drinking alcohol with your mother pretty much crosses all boundaries, a person raised like that would not see the wrong in it as it is the norm, so how would such a person find Sikhi and conservative Sikh culture appealing?  Yes you will have one or two people change here and there, but I'm talking about the vast majority here. 

A person raised in traditional Punjabi household with all the wrongs of Punjabi "culture" happening in their house, still understands traditional values, morals and boundaries and is more likely to get into Sikhi than someone who has been raised in a very westernized liberal way e.g getting p1ssed with your mother on the weekends! 

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