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Sikh school closing

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3 minutes ago, chatanga1 said:

 

The Khalsa Academies Trust (ACT) also have a school in Wolverhampton. It is called "The Khalsa Academy Wolverhampton" (TKAW).

 

When this school was originally set up as the British Sikh School (BSS), by a local partnership from Walsall, they asked for assistance from the Nick Kandola's academy trust.  WHICH WAS THE WORST MISTAKE THEY COULD EVER HAVE MADE.

Kandola's trust took the new BSS into their trust and then putting his people on the board of governors isolated the two partners who were most instrumental in setting up the school. The two were outvoted on everything, the original plan for the school was changed from a Sikh-centric platform to a money-making herd acheivements and results platform.

 

It went to the extent that the two partners who set up the school weren't even informed of meetings. Rumours about them being spread in the school. Being isolated. They couldn't do anything and found themselves resigning. Which handed over total control to the Khalsa Academy Trust - Nick Kandola.

Who was the main player behind these scenes at the school? Raminder Vig.

After Vig, Mrs Sangha was made head. She disappeared suddenly at the end of one of the terms with no explanation to the children/parents except for "she wishes to spend more time with her family."

Which points at something shady happening/happened, which the school has covered up.

 

The result was that the Sikh-centric platform was edged out slowly. First Sikhs studies went out, it was moved to an after school slot under the guise of enrichment. Then the days of enrichment went from 5 to 4, to 3 to 2, and now to 1. Sikh studies is not a part of it any more. Gatka and tabla etc are offered but now students have to pay when they were to be offered for free under the scholls original plan.

The school under the 2 partners wanted to teach Sikh philosophy, Sikh music, Sikh literature Sikh martial arts. They had a plan to elevate Sikhs to higher levels of management on a national and international level. But this has ALL gone out of the window under Kandola's group. They never wanted any of this. They just wanted the school itself.

 

Sadly the Khalsa Acadmeies Trust now have the school . They, masquerading as a Sikh school have turned promising young Sikhs into virtual athiests. There is nothing "Khalsa" - pure about the TKAW. And thats the sad part really. They are no different for Sikh children than any other state school.

The TKAW allowed bibles to be handed out to all its children, yet spent 1 hour on the anniversary of Guru Nanak Dev Ji's birthday to talk about Guru Sahib and his teachings.

 

He is just making sure he has numbers on his side. Kandola's group has got away with it at wolverhampton. Don't let them get away with it again.

 

If it's anything like Wolverhampton school there is no Sikhi there to begin with.

 

The principal at TKAW seems to be the of the same calibre. A yes person.

 

The guy is not to be trusted beleive me. He is one of the main culprits in denying two people the just accreditation and reward for going through a laborious 3 year program in order to set up the school. He plays the part of a "cheeky chappy fun teacher." It's all an act.

 

In Wolverhampton the excitement and buzz of having our own school dampened after the first academic year and fizzled out completely in the second. Children going there for years and can't tell you basic things about Sikhi. The two people who set it up, this was the project of their lives, which they had dedicated their future to. To wrest control of it, and turn it into a money-making scheme was just an abominable act.

 

The churning out of athiestic young Sikhs goes on through this venture.

 

parents were talking about wresting control from the trust and going independent if Nick started going down the route of wolverhampton.

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9 hours ago, chatanga1 said:

 

The Khalsa Academies Trust (ACT) also have a school in Wolverhampton. It is called "The Khalsa Academy Wolverhampton" (TKAW).

 

When this school was originally set up as the British Sikh School (BSS), by a local partnership from Walsall, they asked for assistance from the Nick Kandola's academy trust.  WHICH WAS THE WORST MISTAKE THEY COULD EVER HAVE MADE.

Kandola's trust took the new BSS into their trust and then putting his people on the board of governors isolated the two partners who were most instrumental in setting up the school. The two were outvoted on everything, the original plan for the school was changed from a Sikh-centric platform to a money-making herd acheivements and results platform.

 

It went to the extent that the two partners who set up the school weren't even informed of meetings. Rumours about them being spread in the school. Being isolated. They couldn't do anything and found themselves resigning. Which handed over total control to the Khalsa Academy Trust - Nick Kandola.

Who was the main player behind these scenes at the school? Raminder Vig.

After Vig, Mrs Sangha was made head. She disappeared suddenly at the end of one of the terms with no explanation to the children/parents except for "she wishes to spend more time with her family."

Which points at something shady happening/happened, which the school has covered up.

 

The result was that the Sikh-centric platform was edged out slowly. First Sikhs studies went out, it was moved to an after school slot under the guise of enrichment. Then the days of enrichment went from 5 to 4, to 3 to 2, and now to 1. Sikh studies is not a part of it any more. Gatka and tabla etc are offered but now students have to pay when they were to be offered for free under the scholls original plan.

The school under the 2 partners wanted to teach Sikh philosophy, Sikh music, Sikh literature Sikh martial arts. They had a plan to elevate Sikhs to higher levels of management on a national and international level. But this has ALL gone out of the window under Kandola's group. They never wanted any of this. They just wanted the school itself.

 

Sadly the Khalsa Acadmeies Trust now have the school . They, masquerading as a Sikh school have turned promising young Sikhs into virtual athiests. There is nothing "Khalsa" - pure about the TKAW. And thats the sad part really. They are no different for Sikh children than any other state school.

The TKAW allowed bibles to be handed out to all its children, yet spent 1 hour on the anniversary of Guru Nanak Dev Ji's birthday to talk about Guru Sahib and his teachings.

 

He is just making sure he has numbers on his side. Kandola's group has got away with it at wolverhampton. Don't let them get away with it again.

 

If it's anything like Wolverhampton school there is no Sikhi there to begin with.

 

The principal at TKAW seems to be the of the same calibre. A yes person.

 

The guy is not to be trusted beleive me. He is one of the main culprits in denying two people the just accreditation and reward for going through a laborious 3 year program in order to set up the school. He plays the part of a "cheeky chappy fun teacher." It's all an act.

 

In Wolverhampton the excitement and buzz of having our own school dampened after the first academic year and fizzled out completely in the second. Children going there for years and can't tell you basic things about Sikhi. The two people who set it up, this was the project of their lives, which they had dedicated their future to. To wrest control of it, and turn it into a money-making scheme was just an abominable act.

 

The churning out of athiestic young Sikhs goes on through this venture.

 

Raminder Vig is the headteacher of Khalsa Primary School.

This school was also in trouble a few years ago and he helped to turn it around back into an outstanding school. 

What you might not know is that Khalsa Primary School was set up by Nick Kandola back in 2007.

He was booted out by the trustees and board of Governors. 

It was after this that he was looking to set up the secondary schools.

The story with these guys is a lot more complex than you think.

 

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11 hours ago, Ranjeet01 said:

Raminder Vig is the headteacher of Khalsa Primary School.

This school was also in trouble a few years ago and he helped to turn it around back into an outstanding school. 

I don't know about his credentials as a teacher but his part in the school management esp at British Sikh School was terrible. Cold and calculating.

 

11 hours ago, Ranjeet01 said:

What you might not know is that Khalsa Primary School was set up by Nick Kandola back in 2007.

He was booted out by the trustees and board of Governors. 

I just hope that the same happens sometime at Wolverhampton school, and it is taken on by people with the same vision as the 2 partners who set it up.

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My son attends KPS, I've met Mr Vig a few times and agree he plays the part of cheeky chappy very well. I don't know about any of the history above but he's handled the disruption brought by CVD-19 very well. He conducted online assemblies every week and kept us updated on CVD-19 as well as the secondary school situation. I don't know him well enough to know if he's genuine, but he seems like a good guy to me. 

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On 7/6/2020 at 4:51 PM, kcmidlands said:

.

I've never understood the hate against Nishkam Trust, I've got plenty of friends who's children go to their schools and are really happy, they were put forward to take over a school in Coventry and there was loads of hate there as well, the idea that it is a non-Sikh trust is ridiculous, oh well, each to their own.

It's not hate, people just disagree with their fanaticism for interfaith. In the new Niskham West London school they make sure that the kids who are a majority Sikh have to take part a Hindu, Muslim and Christian assembly during the week. There is probably just a handful of Muslim, Hindu and Christian kids in the scholl and yet the make the majority Sikh kids take part in these assemblies. Khalsa Primary School in Norwood Green does not do this and the have a daily divan in the Gurdwara Sahib. 

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2 hours ago, proactive said:

It's not hate, people just disagree with their fanaticism for interfaith. In the new Niskham West London school they make sure that the kids who are a majority Sikh have to take part a Hindu, Muslim and Christian assembly during the week. There is probably just a handful of Muslim, Hindu and Christian kids in the scholl and yet the make the majority Sikh kids take part in these assemblies. Khalsa Primary School in Norwood Green does not do this and the have a daily divan in the Gurdwara Sahib. 

It comes from the  need to acommodate and be all inclusive.

Our people feel the need to deprecate our needs and prioritise others over ourselves. 

There are elements of gora society that does this and we follow suit.

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4 hours ago, proactive said:

It's not hate, people just disagree with their fanaticism for interfaith. In the new Niskham West London school they make sure that the kids who are a majority Sikh have to take part a Hindu, Muslim and Christian assembly during the week. There is probably just a handful of Muslim, Hindu and Christian kids in the scholl and yet the make the majority Sikh kids take part in these assemblies. Khalsa Primary School in Norwood Green does not do this and the have a daily divan in the Gurdwara Sahib. 

That's an interesting observation, a lot of us old folks (well, those who have children going through the education system) may remember going to school and having nothing but christian based assemblies with occasional "Asian" one thrown into the mix. 

I think that's a decision parents have to take individually, if they feel that a Sikh ethos school should only mean they teach Sikhi then they don't fully understand how the education system works, i think what they are looking for is a Sikh religious school. My kids go to a Sikh ethos school in the midlands (not Nishkam), they have and take part in Sikh assemblies and ones from other religions, the make up of that school is majority Sikh, I've never heard of a parent complaining about it.

If by learning about another religion or taking part in an assembly somehow makes your belief in your religion less then that's something you need to work on, as i mentioned above, i grew up having to take part in Christian assemblies, my religion stayed resolute.

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I did my work experience in a catholic school which is on the same road as the Khalsa primary school and they used to have Catholic assemblies every morning with a prayer and the non Catholics had to be in the assembly but didn't have to take part in the prayer. 

The R.E lessons were Catholic but the teachers would ask the non Catholic kids to say about their religion too. There were a few Sikh/hindu kids and few Pakistani but that was it, had a lot of polish kids that couldn't speak English.

There was a little church in the School too not sure how often the kids used it though. 

The Sikh Primary school on that road is one of the best in the area and the parents are very happy with it, kids learn a lot about Sikhi in that school   more than what your average parents can probably teach or know. 

Further down the road theres a also a Muslim school which was one of the worst in the area, it had the worst Ofsted report and was full of corruption/money problems, not sure how it's doing now. They learn how to read and write in gurmukhi and know several japji sahib pauris of by heart. 

I know a lady whose kids went to the khalsa primary school but she didnt send her kid to the sikh secondary school because she said a lot of parents are saying it's not that good. 

 

 

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1 hour ago, kcmidlands said:

That's an interesting observation, a lot of us old folks (well, those who have children going through the education system) may remember going to school and having nothing but christian based assemblies with occasional "Asian" one thrown into the mix. 

I think that's a decision parents have to take individually, if they feel that a Sikh ethos school should only mean they teach Sikhi then they don't fully understand how the education system works, i think what they are looking for is a Sikh religious school. My kids go to a Sikh ethos school in the midlands (not Nishkam), they have and take part in Sikh assemblies and ones from other religions, the make up of that school is majority Sikh, I've never heard of a parent complaining about it.

If by learning about another religion or taking part in an assembly somehow makes your belief in your religion less then that's something you need to work on, as i mentioned above, i grew up having to take part in Christian assemblies, my religion stayed resolute.

We had those assemblies and they even had some vicar hand out bibles for the students although I doubt that kind of thing would be allowed today. We even had Cliff Richards visit our school and he rambled on about religion as well. There is nothing wrong in learning about other religions but that is what RE is about. Religious schools only have an assembly with their religion and not any other religion. It seems the Nishkam people are so inclusive that they do not even know what assembly a religious school should have. You state that parents don't mind the assemblies of other religions, let's be honest here, the average Sikh parent trusts what ever the school does. The only reason my kid is going there is because the Gurdwara could not not be bothered to build a Khalsa secondary school in the primary school so Nishkam is the best option for al least a Sikh education. If there was a Khalsa secondary school nearby there is no way I would send my kid to Niskham instead of the Khalsa Seondary School. 

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1 hour ago, proactive said:

We had those assemblies and they even had some vicar hand out bibles for the students although I doubt that kind of thing would be allowed today. We even had Cliff Richards visit our school and he rambled on about religion as well. There is nothing wrong in learning about other religions but that is what RE is about. Religious schools only have an assembly with their religion and not any other religion. It seems the Nishkam people are so inclusive that they do not even know what assembly a religious school should have. You state that parents don't mind the assemblies of other religions, let's be honest here, the average Sikh parent trusts what ever the school does. The only reason my kid is going there is because the Gurdwara could not not be bothered to build a Khalsa secondary school in the primary school so Nishkam is the best option for al least a Sikh education. If there was a Khalsa secondary school nearby there is no way I would send my kid to Niskham instead of the Khalsa Seondary School. 

The reason i say the parent's at our youngest kid's school don't mind is because there isn't a whole load of them (religious assemblies that is), we have the usual "festival" ones and there about 2/3 every month solely based around Sikhi but the school has take Sikh principles and moulded them so they are accessible by children from all religions.

Most "free" schools as they were called when they were set up like Nishkam and other's are "Sikh Ethos", i mentioned this in my post, they are not "Sikh Faith Schools" like Guru Nanak Sikh Academy in Hayes for example, at the end of the day it's up to you as a parent where you feel is best for your child, if had the option to send my children to a school like Nishkam i would because i'm more interested in their track record as a school and the education they provide (as far as i'm aware they are on the outstanding list with ofsted).

Just a question, if there was a Khlasa Secondary school nearby but the quality of education and ofsted reports were better  another school nearby would you still choose to send your child to the Khalsa one purely on the basis of religion.

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5 hours ago, Ranjeet01 said:

It comes from the  need to acommodate and be all inclusive.

Our people feel the need to deprecate our needs and prioritise others over ourselves. 

There are elements of gora society that does this and we follow suit.

you can accomodate without forcing sikh kids to do pooja or iftar etc , to each their own  path ... it is the same as baru academies and schools in India insisting on doing hindu rituals , its BS. Imean non-sikh kids aren't expected to do gurdwara assemblies/programmes and are provided an extra language learning at atam academy: after all did Guru Pita ji tell us to observe others rites and rituals or just be aware of them ?

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46 minutes ago, jkvlondon said:

you can accomodate without forcing sikh kids to do pooja or iftar etc , to each their own  path ... it is the same as baru academies and schools in India insisting on doing hindu rituals , its BS. Imean non-sikh kids aren't expected to do gurdwara assemblies/programmes and are provided an extra language learning at atam academy: after all did Guru Pita ji tell us to observe others rites and rituals or just be aware of them ?

You know and I know this, but what is wrong with these people in our quam who go over and beyond what they ought to be doing.

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The big problem with these 'academies' is that they are not-for-profit charities, but that doesn't mean the 'people' involved aren't rewarded very well. The management teams, get paid really well with little accountability + they get access to the local politicians etc. Then of course they decide how school funds are spent, which easily run into millions of pounds ( maintenance, building works, consultants, etc) . Just as many charities are 'dodgy' the same goes for many of these 'academies'

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4 hours ago, kcmidlands said:

The reason i say the parent's at our youngest kid's school don't mind is because there isn't a whole load of them (religious assemblies that is), we have the usual "festival" ones and there about 2/3 every month solely based around Sikhi but the school has take Sikh principles and moulded them so they are accessible by children from all religions.

Most "free" schools as they were called when they were set up like Nishkam and other's are "Sikh Ethos", i mentioned this in my post, they are not "Sikh Faith Schools" like Guru Nanak Sikh Academy in Hayes for example, at the end of the day it's up to you as a parent where you feel is best for your child, if had the option to send my children to a school like Nishkam i would because i'm more interested in their track record as a school and the education they provide (as far as i'm aware they are on the outstanding list with ofsted).

Just a question, if there was a Khlasa Secondary school nearby but the quality of education and ofsted reports were better  another school nearby would you still choose to send your child to the Khalsa one purely on the basis of religion.

I would definately send my son to a Khalsa school even if it had a worse Ofsted report an a non-Sikh school. For one I take a great interest in my children's education, I tutored my son myself through the 11 plus not to get him into a grammer school but so that he would be ahead in year 7 which has worked really well with the lockdown because he has already done the year 7 work in Maths and English. The way I lok at it is that parents have to take a lot of responsiblility for their children's education and know where their weaknesses are and not rely on the school to address this but themselves. The reason I want him in a Sikh school is so that he has a good grounding in our religion and culture. He has learned to play the Tabla which he would not have been able to do in a non-Sikh school and his whole way of thinking is not entirely who a Sikh would think. I heard his sing a shabad to himself while he was doing his homework and because the Khalsa school has a lot of assemblies he gets a chance to sing shabads with his class to the whole school. 

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1 hour ago, imhosingh said:

The big problem with these 'academies' is that they are not-for-profit charities, but that doesn't mean the 'people' involved aren't rewarded very well. The management teams, get paid really well with little accountability + they get access to the local politicians etc. Then of course they decide how school funds are spent, which easily run into millions of pounds ( maintenance, building works, consultants, etc) . Just as many charities are 'dodgy' the same goes for many of these 'academies'

True where ever there is money involved the fraudsters will always find a way to get themselves into positions in order to take advantage.

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