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Hindus experience at Gurdwara: Quora


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Has anyone really seen or experienced Lord Shiva?
 
100+ Answers
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, Experienced White Light
 

No, not Lord Shiva. But Babaji, I believe. Guru Nanak Devji. In July of 2018.

Glad someone asked a question close to what I guess I wanted to answer. Also, my first answer on Quora. Just the push I needed. Though it feels more like a pull :)

Here you go:

On a trip to San Francisco more than a year ago, I had a whole Monday free before an evening flight out. My plan was to visit couple places including San Jose Gurudwara ( house of prayer for Sikh community) which was recommended by local relatives for being a big Gurudwara, nice view from a hill location and an amazing Langar (community feast). I generally visit Gurudwaras mainly for Karaah (a food offering/prasaad) and my Thank-Yous, Karaah because it is delicious with a D and Thank-Yous because my prayers to Guru Nanakji from younger difficult days have been heard and may I add handled well!

This visit was no different. Karaah was on my mind. Plus the chance to see a big beautiful recommended place of attraction for many north Indians visiting San Jose. Light Backpack in hand, Google maps on cell, I was all touristy.

Some background here:

I was born a Hindu and educated in a Christian missionary school- somehow I ended up praying to a Sikh Guru in my teens just because looking at His picture gave me peace. I am also not very religious, rarely visit any place of worship for purpose of prayers and am not a fan of religious customs and procedures, though given a place/situation, I will show respect. Maybe, not so relevant, I was also a science/engineering student. Also, by the time I was in San Francisco, it had been six months since the demise of my father. His and mine was not the smoothest father-daughter relation for decades. But, I missed him and prayed for him every night. One could say I was bit depressed, bit lost, not knowing where he went, knowing that he was no more in my home town, in our house, well taken care of in his old age.

Back to San Jose tourism.

Upon reaching Gurudwara, I was happy to see my expectations were met. Nice hill location, check. Nice view, check. Big Gurudwara, check. After crossing the reception area, as I walked across the connecting walk-way to main prayer room, I could hear the Gurbani, the prayer songs. I entered the main prayer room, comforted at the familliar sight of Guru Granth Sahib (holy book of Sikhs) kept on a platform under a canopy, about 25–30 feet from where I entered- happy for another chance to offer my gratitude for all the good stuff in life. And acutely aware of the delicious aroma filling up the room.

I started walking ahead, some paper money in my hand to donate, organizing my thoughts-mainly order of the things I am thankful for. Few steps and the general area of the Holy Book under the canopy kind of became blurry. It was a sunny 2.30 pm outside, inside was well shaded. The blurriness I was walking into got brighter with the next few steps. I reckoned I was tired and sleep deprived from the hectic pace of the trip. Another step or two, I was in the middle of bright light. LED bright. It want to call it white light but it had the warmth of yellow light in it. So warm and so bright, I can’t see anything but this white light envelope with a hint of yellow . And then I sensed a vague presence-some energy, for lack of another word. Too bright to be seen, to look directly at. Surrounded by the same white envelope I was in. Somehow very ovewhelming. Another step or two-my next thought-Oh no! Why didn’t I come and pray for dad sooner? Next step was with tears streaming down my face as I still walked into the embrace of that bright light. ( Or maybe I was in tears when I sensed the energy, not so sure now. ) As the tears ran down, some crying began, still stepping forward, I realized I am almost near the prayer point, that suddenly became more clearly visible and I found myself in the regular prayer hall. No white light to be seen now. As I sat and bowed to touch my forehead to the ground in prayer, I wept copiously, bit stunned because all I felt until seconds ago was touristy. Forgot all thankyous, said some prayer for my father, sneakily pulled out some tissues I always carry in my purse and got up, walked sideways to sit hoping my head scarf and long open hair would help conceal my weird situation from so may others present in the prayer room.

As I sat, still not fully understanding what just happened, I processed my many thoughts- white light, blurriness, presence, dad, warmth, crying. After another 10 or maybe 20 minutes, I managed to compose myself, get prasaad/Karaah and walk out the prayer room. Spent some time near bushes, fountains and flowers. Also managed to eat Langar as I was hungry by now.

When I left the Gurudwara that day, I felt more relaxed, at peace about my dad. My heart concluded that he is in a good place. Probably with Babaji, my dad’s favorite too.

In summary, I guess I am trying to say, I have not seen Lord Shiva, but I have seen God. Not seen Him with my eyes, too radiant for my eyes to take, but felt Him present strongly. In a vague way. I have been told and have always believed that God is with us, in our heart and everywhere else. I now think I have experience to say that he is right here with us! In front of us. I pray more feverishly now. For just about anything and everything.

P.S.

  1. I did try to keep it short, my best try.
  2. My husband heard the story and did not comment for 3 days. Upon insisting, he told me he thought I must be tired and stressed from the trip.
  3. Upon sharing the story with friends and others, very few were amazed, most did not know what to say. So, I was quiet about it for a long time. Until now.

Thanks for reading :)

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14 minutes ago, MuslimNeighbour said:

Problem with these types of personal experiences is it brings no one closer to the truth. This woman's words hold no value to say a Hindu who would literally eat cow dung, claim he's healthy and disease free because of it, on top of that claim xyz God visits him in his dreams and tells him he's blessed and his Hinduism is the correct path.

That's why the best method to determine which religion is true is an argument for why xyz religion is the truth.

These types of experiences can bring you closer to the Truth if you are open minded, because it inspires one to move ahead, by being a good human being first, and then it shows us that when we go beyond our personal pettiness, or limitations of caste, creed, color and nationality, and enter those subtle spiritual planes, we see only Light / Noor of the divinity within each one of us, in same intensity.

But the fools who do nothing to be better human beings, without having even any remote experience of thst Light which is same within all, so those fools say my god is superior and the best or highest, and under that thick covering of ignorance, incurr in killings, grooming, rapists, crime and terrorism against humanity.

What a disgrace, that also by naming their Divinity while committing those horrendous acts. 

If only anybody could elevate their soul consciousness within, would see that it is same Light, creative energy operating at all levels.

It is our limitations and deep ignorance when we give it forms, size or gender, for in reality Energy has nothing to do with our stupid imagination induced by a mentally sick person long time ago, maybe under narcotic effects, for it leads not towards that Universal Light within us, but direct to the hell for consciously or unconciously comiting those horrendous acts against human beings.

Some call that creative power as Waheguru, others call it God, Parmatma, Khuda, Allah...but these different words in different languages maybe does not change its essence nor reality, so why as fools to kill others? Why? Is it not insane? Let us get above the clouds of ignorance, for then we shall see with our own eyes, that there is only one Sun giving its Light / wisdom, and warmth of love and mercy in equal manner to all beings.

Time to get up and walk towards the one universal Light and leave behind all hatred and stupidity, otherwise we may never get nearer to that Truth, our origin, which we are all looking for.

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33 minutes ago, MuslimNeighbour said:

A lot of waffle right there. Tell me why is that woman's words any more true then a Hindu's who has an 'experience' which leads him or her to validate their own religion?

Nobodys actually in a position to have to validate anything to you. That woman is free to share her testimonial without being mutually exclusive with someone else's. Nor is it a measure to validate anyone's Faith or Practice over another. 

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1 hour ago, MuslimNeighbour said:

A lot of waffle right there. Tell me why is that woman's words any more true then a Hindu's who has an 'experience' which leads him or her to validate their own religion?

It’s not waffle, he spoke the Truth. 

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15 hours ago, MuslimNeighbour said:

A lot of waffle right there. Tell me why is that woman's words any more true then a Hindu's who has an 'experience' which leads him or her to validate their own religion?

quite clearly you did not read properly or at least understand a thing she said. The original article states she was not religious but anytime she did pray it was to Guru Nanak Dev ji at gurdwara , that too was the case with her father. they both seemed from description nominally hindu but held faith in sikhi's teachings and practices. Sikhi is about realising what reality is , living truthfully and reconnecting to Akal Purakh. Her experience she acknowledges is unusual and not to do with hindu practice but her sikhi related practice.

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22 hours ago, GurjantGnostic said:

Nobodys actually in a position to have to validate anything to you. That woman is free to share her testimonial without being mutually exclusive with someone else's. Nor is it a measure to validate anyone's Faith or Practice over another. 

👏👏👏

Very well said

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22 hours ago, MuslimNeighbour said:

A lot of waffle right there. Tell me why is that woman's words any more true then a Hindu's who has an 'experience' which leads him or her to validate their own religion?

To start with, the woman´s words are  credible because it is supported on her own expierence, while of the hindu´s you mention, you do not support it with any such experience, but just on your weak judgements.

And before proceeding further with any clarifications, I am giving you the sikh views as what God or that ultimate Truth is, please enjoy and see the beauty and depth i it, there is no such thing as inducing anybody into sex craze, hatred, and crime, but on respect, humility, love and mercy towards all, this a sign of true divinity, not that of a devlish culture:

Q: Who is God? What does God look like?

A: The Guru Granth Sahib Ji, describes the characteristics  and praises of God.

Right from the begining,  tells us about the description of God:

"God is One.

He is the Supreme Truth.

He the Creator, is without fear and without hate.

He is immortal.

He is neither born and nor does He die.

By Guru's grace shall He be met.

Chant And Meditate on His Name.

In the beginning, He was the Truth. Throughout the ages, He has been the Truth. He is the Truth now and He shall be the Truth forever" 

The most important aspect of being a Sikh, is to understand that, there is one endless God. He is indescribable, inestimable, indubitable, infallible, intangible, imperishable, immutable, immortal, immaculate, immanent, unconquerable, unique, formless, fearless, deathless, timeless, ageless, compassionate, omnipresent and creator of all.

"There is only the One Supreme Lord; there is no other at all.

Spirit, soul and body, all belong to Him; whatever pleases His Will, comes to pass".

God loves everyone. Sikhs believe there is no one superior to God. Furthermore, Sikhs believe that God created all beings, animals, birds, creatures, including humans.

When the first great Guru, Sree Guru Nanak Dev Ji gave this definition to the people who believed differently in God, they were surprised and they asked him, who told you this and how did God come in existence?

The great Guru explained that God Himself gave him this information. God has always been present. The concept of time is very worldly. There is no time, beginning or end when it comes to God. This is very hard to understand for us humans because we are used to the concept of begining and ending with time.

People further asked Guru Nanak Dev Ji about what does God look like?

The great Guru preached that God is formless. God is beyond gender and shape. "He has no form, no shape, no color; God is beyond these three qualities. One understands Him, O Nanak, with whom God is pleased".

God has no body, He is the greatest Spirit of all and our soul is a part of Him.

The main difference between Sikhism and some of the world’s other religions is that there are people who worship Jesus and believe Jesus is God, some people worship Buddha and believe Buddha is God. The Sikh Gurus themselves said that they are not to be worshipped. They expressed very clearly not to worship anyone except God. 

Guru Gobind Singh Ji even put it in harsh words and said, “Those who call me God will fall into the pit of hell. Consider me as a humble servant of God and have no doubt about it.” He wanted to be very clear that He is not God and should not be worshipped. One should only worship the One Almighty Lord.

This is the great greatness of the teachings of sikhee, and its description of the Divine, universal and common to all beings, be them of any religion, for in all is infused His Light.

So if all carry His Light, who is to be called low or high? Only ignorant and blind do so, for they carry a heavy burden of ego and arrogance on their heads. 

SSA.

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On 7/27/2020 at 3:02 AM, MuslimNeighbour said:

Problem with these types of personal experiences is it brings no one closer to the truth. This woman's words hold no value to say a Hindu who would literally eat cow dung, claim he's healthy and disease free because of it, on top of that claim xyz God visits him in his dreams and tells him he's blessed and his Hinduism is the correct path.

That's why the best method to determine which religion is true is an argument for why xyz religion is the truth.

you say this personal experience has no value, yet you believe blindly in the experience of prophet mohammad 1400 years ago in arabia who self claimed of having to traveled to seventh heaven on bura'aq in the night of isra miraj. What evidence you have for that ??

and of an angel jibril coming to him in cave hira to deliver him quran verse by verse. what evidence you have for that ? how do you know mohammad didn't got someone to plagiarize it from bible or torah along with arabic paganism sprinkled here and there . ?

see religion is about beliefs , and not imposing one's views on another.

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