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Bhai Kahn Singh Nabha has done a great task of explaining Gurmat philosophy in this book. 
There is some common ground between Gurmit and other faiths, but the fact remains that the Sikh faith is independent in its own right...

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Ultimately, these "apologetics" and philosophical inter-religion debates are irrelevant. It's not the quality and the substance of the doctrine that matters, but the strength and durability of the proponents (i.e. followers) of the belief system in question. If the legitimacy of a religious path was based on just the validity of its teachings and scriptures, then Islam would've been laughed out the room at its inception. The fact that it took hold, grew, and spread to BILLIONS is because of the desire and the determination of those wanting to see its proliferation on Earth for whatever reason. Yeah, sure, you have to know your stuff when it comes to sneaky fellows from competing faiths who are always looking to undermine other religions and sweep up stragglers, but you can't rely on pure intellectual reasoning to survive. 

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Agreed but the point is to not let the followers lose what they believe in and have it be misrepresented. The proponents should be strong and not waver when other followers of different faiths try and make them waver

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7 hours ago, MisterrSingh said:

Yeah, sure, you have to know your stuff when it comes to sneaky fellows from competing faiths who are always looking to undermine other religions and sweep up stragglers,

thats what this is meant for 🙃

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http://sttm.co/s/5158/58423

ਕਬੀਰ ਰਾਮ ਕਹਨ ਮਹਿ ਭੇਦੁ ਹੈ ਤਾ ਮਹਿ ਏਕੁ ਬਿਚਾਰੁ ॥
Kabeer, it does make a difference, how you chant the Lord's Name, 'Raam'. This is something to consider.

ਸੋਈ ਰਾਮੁ ਸਭੈ ਕਹਹਿ ਸੋਈ ਕਉਤਕਹਾਰ ॥੧੯੦॥
Everyone uses the same word for the son of Dasrath and the Wondrous Lord. ||190||

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