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Why Rumi called all Hindus 'dark unclean dogs'


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12 hours ago, shastarSingh said:
I thought Sufis believed in universal brotherhood and love.

But why Rumi who is a highly respected sufi, called all Hindus as dark unclean dogs  ?

 

Shaikh Ahmad Sirhindi was a naqashbandhi sufi leader during Jahagir's time. He referred to Guru Arjan Dev ji in vile terms. Some even feel he had a great role in Guru Ji's shaheedi by continously instigating jahagir against Guru ji.

Sufis of bollywood/ punjabi music industry are not the only kind of sufi. Seeing Gurdass Maan prancing around in black chaadra and kurta singing "sufi" songs has skewed our perception.

 

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2 hours ago, MisterrSingh said:

Sufism is the same Islamic fraud as the rest of its fellow sects. It's just dressed up in a vaguely mystical finery that cons people into believing it's harmless.

I think u r right veer.

Whats ur view on nakodar vala peer baba where gurdas maan is a chela?

Is it different from Sufism?

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59 minutes ago, shastarSingh said:

I think u r right veer.

Whats ur view on nakodar vala peer baba where gurdas maan is a chela?

Is it different from Sufism?

I don't know what I can say about it. If Gurdas Mann wants to do maanta of a Muslim peer at a jagaa, it's up to him I suppose. I do know enough not to talk 5hit about these kind of things. One doesn't have to worship these figures to realise they have something mystical in their "hands." It's not my cup of tea but to each their own.

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4 hours ago, MisterrSingh said:

Sufism is the same Islamic fraud as the rest of its fellow sects. It's just dressed up in a vaguely mystical finery that cons people into believing it's harmless.

Not all Veer JI Bulleh Shah Was too sufi... And Most of Orthodox shia /Sunni Are Anti SufiS As Allah Dont Like Music It is Haram... 

Allah yaar khan jogi was Too Sufi 

Some sufis may Be Fraud

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I'm pretty sure it was Waris Shah who called the rise of the Sikh misls "doomsday"   lol 

Waris Shah was also a fan of the Mughals. He fought in the Mughal army against the Afghans. Later when he retired and the Mughals defeated the Afghans in some battle he wrote a poem praising the Mughals. 

Unfortunately Sikhs praise and sing poems written by poets like Waris Shah. 

 

 

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Waris Shah fought in the army of Shahnawaz, who was the son of Zakhariya Khan ...

Quite stupid of Sikhs to praise Waris Shah ... 

 

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4 hours ago, Rajasthani said:

Not all Veer JI Bulleh Shah Was too sufi... And Most of Orthodox shia /Sunni Are Anti SufiS As Allah Dont Like Music It is Haram... 

Allah yaar khan jogi was Too Sufi 

Some sufis may Be Fraud

Sufism's ultimate aims correspond with the goals of the Sunni and the Shia, i.e. the establishment of worldwide Sharia and eventual Islamic religious hegemony without opposition. 

Anyone professing to be Sufi and not wanting to advocate for these positions doesn't know the norms of the religion to which they profess allegiance to. The Sunni and Shia want to butcher and rape their way to domination; the Sufi is content to sing and dance his way there. Same thing. 

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5 minutes ago, MisterrSingh said:

Sufism's ultimate aims correspond with the goals of the Sunni and the Shia, i.e. the establishment of worldwide Sharia and eventual Islamic religious hegemony without opposition. 

Anyone professing to be Sufi and not wanting to advocate for these positions doesn't know the norms of the religion to which they profess allegiance to. The Sunni and Shia want to butcher and rape their way to domination; the Sufi is content to sing and dance his way there. Same thing. 

They may want to practice singing only and put down the insturments then. 

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