Jump to content

Why nri Sikhs get so easily emotionally fooled?


Recommended Posts

5 hours ago, Premi5 said:

You seem to love posting these bhangra gifs every chance you get!  My parents I don't think were even aware of bhangra growing up, and they came to UK when they were in adolescence or after; anyone know how bhangra 'grew' in recent generations ? I think it was UK-based bands in 80's because Punjabi music is more than bhangra

I'm only posting them to show just how fudhoo apnay look doing it.

As for the rest of your question, that's a long story in itself. Maybe some other time we will get into it. 

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
  • Replies 53
  • Created
  • Last Reply

Top Posters In This Topic

Top Posters In This Topic

Popular Posts

Why India-resident Sikh leadership use Sikhi as a front for self-enrichment, greed and corruption? 😅

I completely understand what you said here. I played 'dumb' a little because I've asked you the question before but you were not very forthcoming (about whether UK bhangra scene increased popularity o

I think that you REALLY struggle to grasp what I say. And often get the wrong end of the stick. But let me tell you how I think it went.  The 80s were appalling for nonwhites in the UK. Open

Posted Images

Just now, dallysingh101 said:

I'm only posting them to show just how fudhoo apnay look doing it.

As for the rest of your question, that's a long story in itself. Maybe some other time we will get into it. 

Slightly ironic how western Punjabis popularised modern-day bhangra

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
9 minutes ago, dallysingh101 said:

There's a whole backdrop to that. And LOTS of lessons to learn from it. Like I said, some other time. 

I think I have some ideas what you will say, and await in anticipation!

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
23 hours ago, Premi5 said:

On a related point, are Western charities and NGO 'fooling' people as well? I think in some cases, even the big names, they are

I don't think its 'some cases' I think they are all a con job of sorts. When you look at the salaries of the directors you'll see where most of the money really goes. 

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
18 hours ago, Ranjeet01 said:

Also, I think there is a lot of bluffology that goes in our culture in that we are hesitant to ask questions because the perception is that you should implicitly know things.

Have you noticed that other thing they commonly do when asked a question? They actually scoff and tut, like you're some sort of 1diot for asking. Then give some basic, condescending 'answer'. 

Also, if you ask them something they don't know it's like their sociopathy goes on full alert and their jaw slightly tenses, eyes slightly glaze and they stare at you and go all quiet, or pretend they didn't hear the question. They will not admit they don't know. 

F**king fudhoos. 

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
3 hours ago, dallysingh101 said:

Have you noticed that other thing they commonly do when asked a question? They actually scoff and tut, like you're some sort of 1diot for asking. Then give some basic, condescending 'answer'. 

Also, if you ask them something they don't know it's like their sociopathy goes on full alert and their jaw slightly tenses, eyes slightly glaze and they stare at you and go all quiet, or pretend they didn't hear the question. They will not admit they don't know. 

F**king fudhoos. 

Well at least the feminists can't accuse them of mansplaining, lol

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
On 9/11/2021 at 2:16 PM, dallysingh101 said:

You know, to be honest, the average grown up pendu's vocabulary range is like a 8 year old's is here (in English). I've tested a few pendus, they have an equivalent vocabulary range lower than the dumbest english bloke here. They might be chust and chalaak and all that, but their Panjabi language skills are very basic and unsophisticated. Very few of the mfs read regularly. 

There is a link between being able to feel, articulate and express yourself and the range of vocab you have to articulate that. If pendus vocab range is so low, maybe that would explain why they seem like the below image? 285018141_doabanevolution.png.3eabd2a57963926241175b8165da1d05.png

It's not hard for someone of average intelligence to get a better vocab than an average pendu.    Pendus seem to have very basic convos with each other. 

They don't need much vocab I guess, they are getting on fine 

Link to post
Share on other sites
4 hours ago, Premi5 said:

They don't need much vocab I guess, they are getting on fine 

I don't doubt they are, but I'm just making a point about the future of our society if we continue to operate along basic lines. 

That's why other mfs are sending satellites to space, creating modern weaponry, helicopters, airplanes, computers, phones etc. etc. and our lot be like this just because they got  7 straight day dahaarhis in. 

Dubai Punjabi Sticker by Pure Bhangra  

  • Haha 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
On 9/10/2021 at 6:42 PM, shastarSingh said:

Nri Sikhs gave millions of dollars/pounds to kejriwal. Kejriwal used all that money on Delhi instead of punjab.

Baba jaswant Singh told nri Sikhs that he will open dental college for poor sikh students. He got lots of money from nri Sikhs. My sister studied in that college. It's all about money there and no poor Sikhs study there. Even Hindu girls who can offer good money study there.

So many people on the name of khalistan got loads of money from nri Sikhs. Where that money went nobody knows.

Why nri Sikhs give so much money to people without checking/enquiring where that money gets used?

Plz listen at 9:00 sec

Some people using kisan andolan to fool nri Sikhs.

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
On 9/10/2021 at 9:18 PM, shastarSingh said:

Nri Sikhs shud keep caring about Sikhs in India but shud do so wisely.

There are many families of shaheed Singhs who are in pretty bad shape.

On the other hand some fuddus got money from nri Sikhs on the name of khalistan or Kharrku lehar and used that money on making their big kothis.

Nri Sikhs shud be watchful against such deceivers.

Quote

I remember hearing about some pardaan in Southall Gurdwara, collecting a bunch of funds to buy a tank for the K'stan movement. He took a massive amount of Gurdwara funds and then just disappeared with the money, this was in the 80s! lol

 

Unfortunately outside India we've had plenty of 'daswand' collected to help 84 victims over the years in the West. Few years ago there was 'Sikh' organisation which collected well over 6 figs close to 200k to fight cases for those in jail and bring justice no idea where they went or what happen to the money. 

Our kaum is infested with rats and deceivers sadly. 

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
On 9/10/2021 at 9:40 PM, dallysingh101 said:

I remember hearing about some pardaan in Southall Gurdwara, collecting a bunch of funds to buy a tank for the K'stan movement. He took a massive amount of Gurdwara funds and then just disappeared with the money, this was in the 80s! lol

 

Happens all the time even now! Collecting daswand to help 84 victims, to fight cases they raise a heck of money and boom they disappear and you never hear from them again

 

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, Kau89r8 said:

 

Unfortunately outside India we've had plenty of 'daswand' collected to help 84 victims over the years in the West. Few years ago there was 'Sikh' organisation which collected well over 6 figs close to 200k to fight cases for those in jail and bring justice no idea where they went or what happen to the money. 

Our kaum is infested with rats and deceivers sadly. 

I think most of the world has the same issues. 

A lot of charity in the 'West' is a 'con' if you realise that a lot of the money goes towards the charity workers and bosses. So, 'Westerners' are 'fooled' just as easily you could say

  • Like 2
Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...



  • Topics

  • Posts

    • I miss my best pal. I was desolate when he passed away for quite a while (a few years!). Time (I found) does heal and attenuate the intensity of pain.  The busier you keep yourself, and thus from thinking about it, the better. You can't be stuck in constant grieving mode. The grief is heavily psychological, and you have to use a variety of tricks to focus elsewhere. Training helps. Keeping busy (as mentioned previously) helps. Hobbies help. Supportive friends who don't indulge you in excessive emotionality help. If you're going to mope about it for years, then you're not doing yourself any favours. You have to want to get over it, and not indulge in excessive emotionality after a while.  Even then, something will happen that brings them back to mind. But you have to keep moving. When the sun's out I always remember him, and what we'd get up to. I go past a place we used to go to (like a restaurant) and up he pops in my mind. But he's gone somewhere else now, and I'm here, and I have to deal with my own issues now. You have to be tough minded.  Try CBD btw.  
    • that sau sakhi tale is based on Guru Gobind Sigh's bachan after Singh was carried off battlefield unconcious and  injured by Musley and they cut his kesh and tried to convert him: bytrying to feed him  Halal Meat (please note those who think nothing of eating meat in 'halal friendly' eateries ) , doing sunat (circumcision) , reading shahada and even marrying/offering a muslim woman to him. Because he did not take the last option up Guru ji said he was NOT a muslim and could do pesh and rejoin his sikh bretheren.
    • https://www.theguardian.com/uk-news/2021/oct/18/pm-urged-to-enact-davids-law-against-social-media-abuse-after-amesss-death   Potentially an attack on our online freedoms. IF, this includes forums such as these, I will be very reluctant to post again   PM urged to enact ‘David’s law’ against social media abuse after Amess’s death Calls for crackdown on threats to public figures and an end to online anonymity   A notice keeps David Amess’s seat in the Commons free. Photograph: Jessica Taylor/AP   Jessica Elgot Chief political correspondent @jessicaelgot Mon 18 Oct 2021 19.59 BST             Boris Johnson is facing calls to enact “David’s law” to crack down on social media abuse of public figures and end online anonymity in the wake of the killing of Sir David Amess. Dozens of MPs paid tribute in the House of Commons on Monday to the veteran Conservative backbencher who was stabbed to death on Friday, shedding tears, sharing uproarious anecdotes and venting anger over his death.   While police are investigating whether there are any links to Islamist extremism and have not connected the killing to the targeting of MPs online, allies of Amess said he had voiced growing concern about threats and toxicity within public discourse as they demanded a crackdown. Campaigners have warned, however, that ending online anonymity could put whistleblowers and pro-democracy campaigners in authoritarian regimes at risk. Keir Starmer, the Labour leader, told the Commons that “civility in politics matters” but “we must not lose sight of the fact that David’s killing was an [alleged] act of terror on the streets of our country”. Mark Francois, who described Amess as one of his closest friends and his political mentor, vowed he would dedicate his time in parliament to overhauling the rules governing social media. Francois told the Commons he was “minded to drag Mark Zuckerberg [CEO of Facebook] and Jack Dorsey [CEO of Twitter] to the bar of the house … if necessary kicking and screaming so they can look us all in the eye and account for their actions or rather their inactions that make them even richer than they already are”. He said MPs should radically toughen up the pending online harms bill to prevent trolls and other abusers hiding behind pseudonyms. “In the last few years David had become increasingly concerned about what he called the toxic environment in which MPs, particularly female MPs, were having to operate in,” Francois said. “He was appalled by what he called the vile misogynistic abuse which female MPs had to endure online and he told me very recently that he wanted something done about it.”   A man understood to be Ali Harbi Ali is filmed on CCTV walking down a north London street last Friday. Photograph: Sky News Francois, the MP for Rayleigh and Wickford, which neighbours Amess’s Southend West constituency, added: “I suggest that if we want to ensure that our colleague didn’t die in vain, we collectively all of us pick up the baton, regardless of our party and take the forthcoming online harms bill and toughen it up markedly. “Let’s put, if I may be so presumptuous, David’s law on to the statute book, the essence of which would be that while people in public life must remain open to legitimate criticism, they can no longer be vilified or their families subject to the most horrendous abuse, especially from people who hide behind a cloak of anonymity with the connivance of the social media companies for profit.” Bernard Jenkin said MPs should also examine themselves when discussing civility in politics, a nod to some of the disturbing language used during Brexit debates. “Which of us has never felt fallen prey to feelings of contempt or lack of respect or unkindness towards those who oppose us? Which of us can honestly say we cannot do better?” He said kindness should be added to the seven principles of public life. “Henceforth, let kindness be known as the David Amess principle of public life.” Amess, an MP for 38 of his 69 years, was stabbed to death while holding his constituency surgery in an Essex church. Ali Harbi Ali, 25, was arrested at the scene and continues to be detained under terrorism laws. The government intends to pass an online safety bill introducing new obligations on social media companies to regulate illegal and harmful material – though there has been significant controversy over how that can be defined. Compliance will be monitored by Ofcom and the bill is expected to start its passage after pre-legislative scrutiny set to report back in early December. Paying tribute to “one of the nicest, kindest and most gentle individuals ever to grace these benches”, Johnson said Amess’s killing struck at the heart of the ordinary democratic work of MPs. “That Sir David spent almost 40 years in this house but not one day in ministerial office tells everything about where his priorities lay,” he said. “He was not a man in awe of this chamber, nor a man who sought patronage or advancement. He simply wanted to serve the people of Essex, first in Basildon, then in Southend. And it was in the act of serving his constituents that he was so cruelly killed.” Starmer said: “Even as a political opponent he was a man and a politician we could all learn much from. I use that phrase – ‘political opponent’ – very deliberately. Because David held his beliefs passionately but gently. I believe that not only can we learn from that but that we have a duty to do so. Civility in politics matters.” Starmer spoke to the parents of Jo Cox, the Labour MP murdered by a far-right terrorist in 2016, on Friday, he said. “I knew they would be reliving that terrible day. They said to me they were thinking of David’s family and how their lives would be changed forever,” he said. Cox’s widower, Brendan Cox, also said it was a moment to reflect on political discourse and a “day-to-day brutality with which our political debate is conducted, from increasingly regular death threats to online abuse”. The police team convened after his wife’s murder to investigate threats against MPs found 582 reports of malicious communications and handled 46 cases of harassment between 2016 and 2020, he said. Nine cases were classified as terrorism-related.
    • I have lost people in my life close to me. The feeling you have is emptiness.  The person filled a gap in your life which is missing.  In the modern world, we think of death of being separate from life, but it is in fact part of life. As you get older and you attend more funerals this is something you begin to accept. What death has taught me is that it is "finite" in this particular life that I am currently in now and I should be living it and live it better. If I live this life better and more fulfilled then I will either merge with the Akaal or live the next life at a better level.  Whatever Maharaj in his hukam has accepted for me is good. If I can leave this world accomplishing what I set out to prior to entering this life then I can leave this life with some level of Santhoki.  Your wife came into this world and set out to achieve whatever Maharaj in his hukam chose for her. She has achieved what she was set out to do and has moved to the next level. Cherish the moments you had with your wife. 
×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

Terms of Use