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18 minutes ago, Premi5 said:

 

https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-nottinghamshire-54600285

Nottinghamshire woman duped by 'soul mate' in online dating fraud

Published
20 October 2020
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I love you, written on text messageIMAGE SOURCE,GETTY IMAGES
Image caption,
The woman said the experience has left her at "rock bottom"

A woman who was conned out of thousands of pounds by a romance fraudster has said it has taken her to "financial and emotional rock bottom".

The woman spent £8,500 on a man she thought was her "soul mate" before realising she was being duped.

Sarah, not her real name, wants to stop others going through the same ordeal.

Nottinghamshire Police said it fears such cases could become more common as coronavirus restrictions risk people feeling more isolated.

The scam began last year when the woman, from Nottinghamshire, set up an online dating profile on Our Time, a site for people over 50, and started speaking to "Adam".

"Adam" claimed he was a 52-year-old electrical engineer from the Nottinghamshire village of Keyworth who was working in Benin, Africa.

Sarah, a psychologist, said she had taken years to recover emotionally from a break-up with her husband.

She told the BBC: "I just wanted to be loved."

She and "Adam" formed a bond, speaking about families, meeting up and going on a dream holiday to Venice together.

VeniceIMAGE SOURCE,GETTY IMAGES
Image caption,
The pair discussed their "dream" of visiting Venice together

"I'd already been through so much; I genuinely thought this was my second chance," Sarah said.

"I truly believed he was my soul mate. It was too good to be true."

'All a fantasy'

They made plans to meet up last Christmas and she sent money for his tickets.

He never made it, claiming he could not get a flight.

After this, she sent him thousands more via bank transfers and Bitcoin, cashing in three pensions and taking out a £2,000 overdraft.

She also sent him a MacBook.

She added she believes the coronavirus crisis prolonged the fraud as it gave him reasonable excuses not to see her.

But by this summer, she said she realised, "it was all a fantasy".

She now fears not being able to pay her bills.

She said: "It has taken me to emotional and financial rock bottom.

"I hope [by speaking out] I can stop another person going through the pain I feel."

No arrests have been made.

Det Insp Ed Cook said: "Nationally there has been a rise in this kind of crime in the past year.

"Potentially there are more people spending more time at home on social media and becoming more isolated."

He urged people to check on friends and family members, and for anyone experiencing what Sarah did to get in touch with them.

 

I don’t think I’m getting scammed, if anything he’s the one who said he would fly out to me. lol. Also when I mentioned how I’d miss my mum and sis if I ever wanted a real relationship with him in the Netherlands he said ‘you can always visit them on the weekends, just a one hour flight to UK!’ <banned word filter activated>

but everyone really turned me off him! ngl

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Forgive me Jio. Lol. I loved the part where I said not to convert people to Sikhi. We all did in fact! I mean if they have a thing for us that bad or want the real debate they can take the mask o

That's a big no. Make sure you are financially independant and never rely on the man for money. Seen that happen too many times and it ends up fcking the woman and kids up without them realising. 

I'm thinking of creating a marriage app for Sikhs who are reluctant to get married but are being badgered by their parents to find a partner. I'm naming it, Hide and Sikh. 😅

12 minutes ago, Jassu said:

I don’t think I’m getting scammed, if anything he’s the one who said he would fly out to me. lol. Also when I mentioned how I’d miss my mum and sis if I ever wanted a real relationship with him in the Netherlands he said ‘you can always visit them on the weekends, just a one hour flight to UK!’ <banned word filter activated>

but everyone really turned me off him! ngl

That doesn’t mean anything 

 

12 minutes ago, Jassu said:

I’m not considering any man who won’t take in my mother!

Gore are known for living with their extended family ?!

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Just now, Premi5 said:

That doesn’t mean anything 

 

Gore are known for living with their extended family ?!

No they are not lol but the way he said ‘just go and see them on the weekends’ is just plain rude. Almost all cultures live with their extended family except goreh

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https://sikhing.app/guk-1?gclid=EAIaIQobChMI6vvLg_Wo9AIVEL_tCh1sMg_YEAMYASAAEgKDF_D_BwE

Sikhing is the Sikh Dating and Sikh Marriage app for all Sikhs seeking their perfect partner 

 

Built by our team in London, UK we’re passionate about all things technology and digital. We felt the current offerings for Single Sikhs were lacking - existing dating websites and apps were outdated, expensive, difficult to use or simply just catered to a different audience

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On 11/21/2021 at 1:47 PM, MisterrSingh said:

I'm thinking of creating a marriage app for Sikhs who are reluctant to get married but are being badgered by their parents to find a partner. I'm naming it, Hide and Sikh. 😅

Haha

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2 hours ago, Not2Cool2Argue said:

Not gonna lie. It means same thing as tbh. To be honest. 

Both of these are funny:

ngl - Oh, so does that mean a lot of the time you do lie then?

tbh - Oh, is honesty an exception for you then, so much so, you have to tell me that you're being honest right now, as opposed to all the other times you weren't?

 

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On 11/14/2021 at 5:17 PM, Jassu said:

I live in a <banned word filter activated> dominated town near Manchester. We moved because we’re poor and now we’re stuck here because we’re poor.

edit: why is <banned word filter activated> banned lol

edit: muslim 

@Jassu

Where there's a will, there's a way. Why not move elsewhere ? Some places in the Midlands might be affordable ?

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