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Sidhu Moosewala joins Congress party


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3 hours ago, GurjantGnostic said:

He said what? <banned word filter activated> Moosedrool. Lol. What a poser. 

And if you're gonna try and rep this gangster image, lift a fricking weight bro and get some clothes that fit. He looks like he's looking for his car in the walmart parking lot in the 90s. 

Maybe that’s what gangsters look like in Punjab

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Our lot are very foolish. The only thing they love being proud of is being an alcoholic and doing bhangra. Nothing else. Will run over their own to get clicks and likes from others. Just keep giving f

Omg this is so pathetic. If our politicians are people like Sidhu Moosewala, of course the state of Punjab is not looking well. I’m actually cringing right now. Anything for votes, seriously? Lol this

Honestly im hoping for china to invade india soon lol.

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Punjabi /Sikh leader ships lacks intellectuals leadership...

Take a look at Punjabi Hindus..why do they dominate in business/economically compare to Sikh Panjabis Jatt...

Then you have Gujjis  South Indians - Tamils 

Immigration from India, Punjabi end up labor jobs rest indians fill up IT jobs, dominated silicon valley 

It easy for us to give our heads shaheeds for the panth, but what are we achieving...whats our goal

 

 

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26 minutes ago, Kau89r8 said:

Punjabi /Sikh leader ships lacks intellectuals leadership...

Take a look at Punjabi Hindus..why do they dominate in business/economically compare to Sikh Panjabis Jatt...

They you have Gujjis  South Indians - Tamils 

Immigration from India, Punjabi end up labor jobs rest indians fill up IT jobs, dominated silicon valley 

It easy for us to give our heads shaheeds for the panth, but what are we achieving...whats our goal

 

 

yup true most of the sikhs in punjab are not really rich. We dont even have much intellectuals in our panth. Just look at jews and compare their intellectual achievements to us.

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1 minute ago, proudkaur21 said:

yup true most of the sikhs in punjab are not really rich. We dont even have much intellectuals in our panth. Just look at jews and compare their intellectual achievements to us.

We dont even need to look at jews, tbh they are in diff league, hindus brahmins south indians gujjis compared to us Punjabi  Sikhs in India and in West..they dominating banks, science, med, business, top forbes lists etc...yet we just either wanting to show gora validation with langar and 'omg Sikhs are amazing people' or wanting justice/rallys/ for 84 and thinking someone in going to bring Khalistan and justice for 84...same thing again and again and wander why we same situation for so many years..

We can either learn from 84, use that pain motivation to follow Sikhi they want to destroy best revenge....and start investing in education serious leadership, financially etc.. or carry on with rally, activism, ready to die for the panth (which they want less Sikh population = win for them) hunger strikes, ending up in jail etc ..Waheguru will bring justice in next world

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Just now, Kau89r8 said:

We dont even need to look at jews, tbh they are in diff league, hindus brahmins south indians gujjis compared to us Punjabi  Sikhs in India and in West..they dominating banks, science, med, business, top forbes lists etc...yet we just either wanting to show gora validation with langar and 'omg Sikhs are amazing people' or wanting justice/rallys/ for 84 and thinking someone in going to bring Khalistan and justice for 84...same thing again and again and wander why we same situation for so many years..

We can either learn from 84, use that pain motivation to follow Sikhi they want to destroy best revenge....and start investing in education serious leadership, financially etc.. or carry on with rally, activism, ready to die for the panth (which they want less Sikh population = win for them) hunger strikes, ending up in jail etc ..Waheguru will bring justice in next world

yup our lot just think short term. No long term goals or plans for our people or how to develop punjab. Literally cant develop a small piece of land like punjab for our people the hell are we gonna do in the future? Just run and live in gora's country, assimilate and end sikhi from our lineage.

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Just now, proudkaur21 said:

yup our lot just think short term. No long term goals or plans for our people or how to develop punjab. Literally cant develop a small piece of land like punjab for our people the hell are we gonna do in the future? Just run and live in gora's country, assimilate and end sikhi from our lineage.

We end up dying either borders or ready to die for the panth  = win for india less Sikh population (As if the gov will give back regardless if we have panthic leader in Panjab) , whilst gujjis, arabs, brahmins are taking over Panjab , investing economically from within India and Outside 

We haven't learnt our lesson and have stubborn leaders who cant think outside their narrow framework

 

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1 minute ago, Kau89r8 said:

We end up dying either borders or ready to die for the panth  = win for india less Sikh population (As if the gov will give back regardless if we have panthic leader in Panjab) , whilst gujjis, arabs, brahmins are taking over Panjab , investing economically from within India and Outside 

We haven't learnt our lesson and have stubborn leaders who cant think outside their narrow framework

 

the worst is the people dying for panth means we have less panthic people. The only ones dying and getting jailed for sikhi are the panthic people not these rich so called city sikhs who live to end sikhi in their families by trying to assimilate in the cities because they think sikhi is backward. Its so sad. Dont see any solution. Seems like we are stuck from everywhere. Do you go back to punjab form a party for your people but no these so called people will not vote for religion they will vote for who can give them daru. Hate it man. See no solution. The increasing globalisation and westernisation is so damaging to spirituality.

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55 minutes ago, Kau89r8 said:

We dont even need to look at jews, tbh they are in diff league, hindus brahmins south indians gujjis compared to us Punjabi  Sikhs in India and in West..they dominating banks, science, med, business, top forbes lists etc...yet we just either wanting to show gora validation with langar and 'omg Sikhs are amazing people' or wanting justice/rallys/ for 84 and thinking someone in going to bring Khalistan and justice for 84...same thing again and again and wander why we same situation for so many years..

 

How religious are these people? How much paath do they do ? How much do these Jews try to stand out from goray?

How much are they into maya?

Although it's also true to say many 'Sikhs' are not religious yet not 'achieving '  as much as these groups. 

Do you think we should have a Sikh community that is politically stronger, but religiously much less than it is now, say, like the Jews ?

 

Found this resource which is  interesting

https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/media/57a08b1eed915d622c000af5/india-religions_and_development_02.pdf

 

5. Concluding Comments

Notwithstanding some very obvious development deficits, economically Sikhs have done fairly well as a community. The desire for social and economic mobility is extremely strong among them. One of the central features of the Sikh self-image is the image of ‘a hard-working and mobile community’. Mobility is perhaps the single most important secular value among the Sikhs.

Though compared to the followers of other religious traditions in India, the number of Sikhs is quite small; they can be seen in almost every part of the country and in every sphere of economic life. They have also been a globally mobile community, being among the first from the subcontinent to explore the Western hemisphere. There are substantial number of Sikhs in countries like United Kingdom, the United States and Canada and smaller populations of Sikhs can be found in many other countries of the world. The desire to go to foreign lands for better economic opportunities continues to be strong among the Sikhs.

Though the green revolution technology was introduced in different parts of the country, it was in Punjab that it proved most effective. Scholars writing on the subject give due credit to the community culture of the Sikhs, particularly to the Jat Sikh farmers. For a long time Punjab was the richest state in India, with highest per capita income. As shown above, the incidence of poverty among the Sikhs is far less than amongst any other religious community.

The available official data also shows a move away from agriculture and growing occupational diversification among Sikhs. However, notwithstanding these achievements and the pride they take in the ‘modernity’ of their religious ethos, Sikhs are not a homogenous community. Apart from the economic inequalities that characterise the Sikh population, like any other religious community, Sikhs are also confronted with several other developmental challenges.

While ideologically Sikhism does not support caste-based inequality or the idea of untouchability, in social and political life, the community continues to be divided on caste lines. Even though the growing institutionalisation of democratic politics and economic development during the post-independence period have weakened the older structures of hierarchy and social inequality, caste prejudice persists. (see Jodhka, 2000, 2002, 2004). Perhaps even more important than caste is the question of gender inequality. Even though the Sikh religion provides useful resources for fighting against gender-based discrimination, these resources have not been used effectively to ‘reform’ the patriarchal culture of the community. The near-obsession with mobility has also created side-effects, one of which is excessive consumerism and desperation to go abroad

 

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@Premi5 

Hasidic Jews...there are range of Jews religious to non-religious...but how do you think they managed to keep jewish population growing after holocasut 

Those rich jews help with hasidic religious Jews who manage to keep their Jewish population growing..they pay for them to have 7+ kids... 

If we are going to complain why our committees are corrupt or why we sell-outs, then we should learn the importance being economically successful 

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33 minutes ago, Kau89r8 said:

@Premi5 

Hasidic Jews...there are range of Jews religious to non-religious...but how do you think they managed to keep jewish population growing after holocasut 

Those rich jews help with hasidic religious Jews who manage to keep their Jewish population growing..they pay for them to have 7+ kids... 

If we are going to complain why our committees are corrupt or why we sell-outs, then we should learn the importance being economically successful 

Breeding is mandatory. It sounds, meh, okay, but the women are not fond of it. It's marital rape on a timetable for a lot of them. 

The financial support from the community is commendable. 

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3 hours ago, proudkaur21 said:

Our lot are very foolish. The only thing they love being proud of is being an alcoholic and doing bhangra. Nothing else. Will run over their own to get clicks and likes from others. Just keep giving free food to people. Thats only what we are good for. Imagine being proud of the fact that people think you are free food community. Everytime i see news about langar seva in terms of adversity, i cringe.

https://register-of-charities.charitycommission.gov.uk/charity-details/?subid=0&regid=1163294

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3 hours ago, proudkaur21 said:

. Do you go back to punjab form a party for your people but no these so called people will not vote for religion they will vote for who can give them daru. Hate it man. See no solution. The increasing globalisation and westernisation is so damaging to spirituality.

Bare in mind the population of Panjabi Hindus, and Christians they will NEVER vote in favour Sikh independent state even if there was a vote without any issue in Panjab.. Best we either learn to swim with sharks or against the sharks...We need to learn to sit back and do our dealings quietly like Gujjis ..this mindset  to die and fight for our rights no matter what cost has come at fair share of bloodshed and loss for Sikh panth..

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32 minutes ago, Kau89r8 said:

Bare in mind the population of Panjabi Hindus, and Christians they will NEVER vote in favour Sikh independent state even if there was a vote without any issue in Panjab.. Best we either learn to swim with sharks or against the sharks...We need to learn to sit back and do our dealings quietly like Gujjis ..this mindset  to die and fight for our rights no matter what cost has come at fair share of bloodshed and loss for Sikh panth..

Honestly im hoping for china to invade india soon lol.

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