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Well that backfired! Indian minister, 48, drinks dirty water from 'holy' river polluted with sewage to show locals it's safe... before he's rushed to hospital after falling ill


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1 minute ago, 5aaban said:

Definitely, there is a severe lack of strategic goals or planning from government, agricultural universities and people. It doesn't help when people elect governments based on freebies. People need to get over freebies and actually demand governments to take real action if they want votes. 

Promoting bhangra singers to political leaders is a major fudhoo move too. 

What does that say about our lot................  

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Disgusting! He's also rolling out a new initiative to clean up Panjab's rivers. The state of rivers in Panjab is very saddening. Ravi river is the most polluted in the world (although most of it

Our community really lacks educated/intellectual people. By educated, I don't mean having a PhD or speaking English but people who really understand our issues, how to approach them and think long ter

Well explained. I can't emphasise this enough but majority of Panjabis/Sikhs are driven by short-term gains. Many of the problems facing Panjab's environment and people are a result of their own actio

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1 hour ago, dallysingh101 said:

Promoting bhangra singers to political leaders is a major fudhoo move too. 

What does that say about our lot................  

Bhangra isn't even Panjabi culture, its an amalgamation of many dances and hip-hop. Why is this being promoted on such an extensive scale?

Why can't they promote sports on the same level (like Ludhiana's Kila Raipur rural olympics) 

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I'm an avid reader of Panjabi history and no one dressed like these Bhangra-dancers, which many claim to be epitomes of Panjabi culture. 

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9 minutes ago, 5aaban said:

But they want to do this, it's embarrassing (everything from costume to moves). I'm an avid reader of Panjabi history and no one dressed like these Bhangra-dancers, which many claim to be epitomes of Panjabi culture. 

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Yeah, one day I'll show the forum what the true 'scantily clad' dress was for jut men, before the big skirt somehow snuck its way in. 

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5 minutes ago, dallysingh101 said:

Yeah, one day I'll show the forum what the true 'scantily clad' dress was for jut men, before the big skirt somehow snuck its way in. 

Depends on district. I've read several books and gazetteers on dress and it depended on weather, district/area and religion. For example, most men in Panjab regardless of community used to wrap a unstitched white sheet around the torso in summers and stitched shirts were only worn in winters. A short "Choli" blouse was worn by some communities but it became discouraged as more people adopted Victorian ideas of modesty. Even Indian Sari's didn't have a blouse, it was first introduced by Jnanadanandini Devi to uphold British ideas of modesty in public. Same with attitudes to breastfeeding became more closed, earlier it was considered very normal to do it in public but it was later shunned. 

 

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1 minute ago, 5aaban said:

Depends on district. I've read several books and gazetteers on dress and it depended on weather, district/area and religion. For example, most men in Panjab used to wrap a white sheet around the torso in summers and stitched shirts were only worn in winters.  

I've seen pre-annexation paintings! People working in heat like that stripped down. lol 

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2 minutes ago, dallysingh101 said:

I've seen pre-annexation paintings! People working in heat like that stripped down. lol 

Ideas of modesty were different. I have a collection of old paintings, drawings and photographs to observe the changes in clothing. There are drawings and photos of women openly breastfeeding, as it was seen as natural. Today, something like this would be unimaginable in Panjab!

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13 minutes ago, dallysingh101 said:

Might as well do it now. All you juts, this is how your recent ancestors really dressed - the saucy sods! Probably why dasmesh pita brought kasheras in! lol

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Thats not the main dress. It's called a "jhaangiya" which was worn by sports-players, wrestlers and working men sometimes but it wasn't the normal or main dress. 

1883 description of mens clothing

 

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3 minutes ago, 5aaban said:

Ideas of modesty were different. I have a collection of old paintings, drawings and photographs to observe the changes in clothing. There are drawings and photos of women openly breastfeeding, as it was seen as natural. Today, something like this would be unimaginable in Panjab!

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This wasn't a biggy when I was young. 

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2 minutes ago, 5aaban said:

Thats not the main dress. It's called a "jhaangiya" which was worn by sports-players, wrestlers and working men sometimes but it wasn't the normal or main dress. 

I've seen a few paintings from way back explicitly mentioning juts as the subjects, and they were all dressed like this.

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5 minutes ago, dallysingh101 said:

I've seen a few paintings from way back explicitly mentioning juts as the subjects, and they were all dressed like this.

I've read numerous gazetteers from the 19th and 20th century that mention unbleached Kurta & chaddar as main dress and a white sheet for summers (in relation to Jats). They also specify the colours worn by different communities and religions (e.g. Hindus refrained from Green and  Sikhs preferred blue). 

This is from Malva region 1883, where Panjabis co-resided with Bagris. 

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Rural communities dressed similar. This is from the Tarkhan community of Panjab.

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22 minutes ago, dallysingh101 said:

Might as well do it now. All you juts, this is how your recent ancestors really dressed - the saucy sods! Probably why dasmesh pita brought kasheras in! lol

1616542134_2juts.png.d779dbc41ed918acab0fb3bce160cf1c.png

 

Found some information on this dress. It's called a "Janghia" and it wasn't the main dress. But it was worn during physical-work by some, the dhoti or Chaddra was still the main garment. Once they became baptised into Sikhi, it was replaced with a Kachera. 

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1 minute ago, 5aaban said:

I've read numerous gazetteers from the 19th and 20th century that mention unbleached Kurta & chaddar as main dress and a white sheet for summers (in relation to Jats). They also specify the colours worn by different communities and religions (e.g. Hindus refrained from Green and  Sikhs preferred blue). 

I'm talking about jut male dress prior to them becoming Sikhs. Even in some afghan accounts of passing through Panjab with loot, there are references to being attacked by 'bare bottomed juts' when crossing streams. I didn't understand that until I started coming across these images.   

This one is REALLY interesting. I'm pretty sure the circled bit is a jut family in the early process of converting to Sikhi visiting Bhai Bir Singh Naurangabad's langar, and bringing contributions. Note the similarity of dress of the man, with the previous image I posted. What's those pitchforks called in Panjabi? 

 

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3 minutes ago, 5aaban said:

 

Found some information on this dress. It's called a "Janghia" and it wasn't the main dress. But it was worn during farm-work by some, the dhoti or Chaddra was still the main garment. Once they became baptised into Sikhi, it was replaced with a Kachera. 

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I knew it!!! lol

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