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Well that backfired! Indian minister, 48, drinks dirty water from 'holy' river polluted with sewage to show locals it's safe... before he's rushed to hospital after falling ill


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2 minutes ago, dallysingh101 said:

I knew it!!! lol

It was worn by other communities too, I believe the cattle-grazers were mainly Muslims. But in general, the Hindu men of Panjab wore shorter Dhoti's compared to Chaddra/Majhla worn by Sikh and Muslims outside of physical work. image.png.36e47d7e1d11a0b1d77b0a8bcf2f0099.png 

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Disgusting! He's also rolling out a new initiative to clean up Panjab's rivers. The state of rivers in Panjab is very saddening. Ravi river is the most polluted in the world (although most of it

Our community really lacks educated/intellectual people. By educated, I don't mean having a PhD or speaking English but people who really understand our issues, how to approach them and think long ter

Well explained. I can't emphasise this enough but majority of Panjabis/Sikhs are driven by short-term gains. Many of the problems facing Panjab's environment and people are a result of their own actio

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24 minutes ago, dallysingh101 said:

This one is urban (Amtritsar) not rural: 

Untitled.png.4cca5689e03ca83734a5ffe2af70c5d1.png

I've seen this. This shows a lot of communities living in urban Amritsar, including Kashmiri muslims  and Hindus.  
 

 

 

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10 hours ago, dallysingh101 said:

This is (at least based) upon one of the most earliest image of Singhs:

mahratta-yeoman-warrior-with-sword-and-sikh-warriors-in-turbans-and-FY3D9W.jpg.e9bb5f0d89aaf613b942aa5bd9264735.jpg

Sikh school girls 

image.png.73ef4961f0a2b3c81b65de69f78ee88b.png

1875. Amritsar. Girls enrolled in a school run by the Church Missionary School. 

image.png.649aa04928ab1108cbe2124a3b6fa6a2.png

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45 minutes ago, 5aaban said:

 

Found some information on this dress. It's called a "Janghia" and it wasn't the main dress. But it was worn during physical-work by some, the dhoti or Chaddra was still the main garment. Once they became baptised into Sikhi, it was replaced with a Kachera. 

image.png.372c2a7e0a40a89fb70386979a753b4a.png

image.png.833a2161033198ae43fe0f267910bbca.png

 

image.png

So basically, Amritdharis previously had an aversion to wearing long skirts not long ago, but today......

Thanks a lot jut culture....

 

 

 

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12 minutes ago, dallysingh101 said:

So basically, Amritdharis previously had an aversion to wearing long skirts not long ago, but today......

Thanks a lot jut culture....

 

 

 

Well most Amritdharis in the past did wear a Chaddra (what you call "long skirt") since it was the main dress of males. No one in Panjab wore a Pajama/stitched trousers until the 20th century, even then it didn't gain popularity until 1940s onwards. However, the difference was Amritdharis wore a Kachera under a Chaddra. Many old Amritdharis in villages still wear a Kurta-Chaddra. 

Chaddra/Majhla/Tamba are main garments. Women in Pakistan Panjab's Jhang tract also wore these, sometimes its wrapped differently known as "dhudder". 

Jhangiya, Langot and Kacchera can be considered undergarments, worn under the above. People who engaged in physical-work or wrestlers sometimes took off the above and just wore these on thier own. A Kacherra provided more covering than Jhangiya/Langot which is why it was preferred by Sikhs and a requirement for Amritdharis. 

Dhoti was worn by Hindu men which is shorter than Chaddra/Majhla/Tamba and tied differently. 

 

 

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11 minutes ago, 5aaban said:

Well most Amritdhari's in the past did wear a Chaddra (what you call "long skirt") since it was the main dress of males. No one in Panjab wore a Pajama/stitched trousers until the 20th century, even then it didn't gain popularity until 1940s onwards. However, Amritdhari's wore a Kachera under a Chaddra. 

 

 

How do you know this? 

I think that must have only started when covertly antiSikh juts started infiltrating the quom. All early images and early narratives of Khalsa Sikhs explicitly mention kasheras as the definitive Sikh dress. I think the chaddar is antiSIkh myself. You can sense a lingering aversion to these other dhoti/janghia things even in the later gazetteer accounts you've posted.  

The pictures of juts I posted earlier (which predate the gazetteer accounts you posted) show how jut men dressed going about their everyday business, at least when the weather wasn't cold.  The Bhai Bir Singh image is very significant, because attending the langar would have been an event, but as as we can see, the jut bloke who has turned up with his family is wearing what juts normally would everyday (in hot weather).  

I've seen a few more images exactly like this but can't find them now. It seems to be enough of a normalised look in the past that independent painters recreated it in independently created art. 

Waheguru knows how it came to this? But I guess we can at least say, if nothing else, jut men have learnt not to expose their bhunds over the last few centuries. I guess that's progress. 

 

Traditional Folk Dance Modernized : NPR 

 

 

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10 hours ago, dallysingh101 said:

How do you know this? 

I think that must have only started when covertly antiSikh juts started infiltrating the quom. All early images and early narratives of Khalsa Sikhs explicitly mention kasheras as the definitive Sikh dress. I think the chaddar is antiSIkh myself. You can sense a lingering aversion to these other dhoti/janghia things even in the later gazetteer accounts you've posted.  

The pictures of juts I posted earlier (which predate the gazetteer accounts you posted) show how jut men dressed going about their everyday business, at least when the weather wasn't cold.  The Bhai Bir Singh image is very significant, because attending the langar would have been an event, but as as we can see, the jut bloke who has turned up with his family is wearing what juts normally would everyday (in hot weather).  

I've seen a few more images exactly like this but can't find them now. It seems to be enough of a normalised look in teh past that independent painters presented it in independently created art. 

Waheguru knows how it came to this?

 

Traditional Folk Dance Modernized : NPR 

 

 

I've seen old men of all communities wear Chaddra, including many Tarkhans in the village (and it was not a Jat majority village). Whatever applies to Jats, generally applies to every rural community including Tarkhans from books I've read and personally seen. Some Sikh Tarkhans also owned land and wore the same dress in Ferozepur district. 

Chaddra may look "anti-Sikh" now, but it was worn by Amritdharis of the past since it was the only main dress of men at the time. Just because Bhangra-dancers wear it in an embarrassing way doesn't mean it was like that. Any stitched garment like "Pajama" was only worn by people of high social rank or in the army.That bloke might not be Jat, he could be a camel-herder, they wore the same. 

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1 minute ago, 5aaban said:

I know this because I read a lot of books on 19th & 20th century Panjab from different sources, I also talk to elders and I have a large collection of images & drawings from those areas. 


I've seen old men of all communities wear Chaddra, including many Tarkhans in the village. You seem to have prejudice against Jats but whatever applies to them, generally applies to every rural community including Tarkhans from books I've read and personally seen.

Chaddra might be anti-Sikh in your eyes, but it was worn by Amritdharis of the past since it was the only main dress of men at the time. Just because Bhangra-dancers wear it in an embarrassing way doesn't mean it was like that. That bloke might not be Jat, he could be a camel-herder, they wore the same. 

I don't like that whole look myself. We've had serious conflicts over it in my ends. Put simply, I can't think of anything that looks more gay than some brightly and garishly dressed 'men', wearing long skirts, prancing about in a coordinated fashion on a stage, waggling their heads and grinning like twats.

Looks like some hardcore, homosexual, mating ritual to me. And it makes Sikh males look strange. 

And this peasant horseshyte disguised as some sort of 'culture' played a major part in creating an environment that led to thousands of Sikh girls being groomed and abused, as well as openly promoting alcoholism and all manner of gundghee. Not to mention the general low brow nature of it all. 

I can't stand anything about it, past or present. Seeing it, makes me want to vomit. If I had my way, I'd execute anyone dressed in that way just as a precautionary measure.   It disgusts me in a way I couldn't really articulate in words. It sort of perfectly captures our current, underdeveloped, backwards state, and feels like a slap in our face. 

Rant over. 

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9 minutes ago, dallysingh101 said:

I don't like that whole look myself. We've had serious conflicts over it in my ends. Put simply, I can't think of anything that looks more gay than some brightly and garishly dressed 'men', wearing long skirts, prancing about in a coordinated fashion on a stage, waggling their heads and grinning like twats.

Looks like some hardcore, homosexual, mating ritual to me. And it makes Sikh males look strange. 

And this peasant horseshyte disguised as some sort of 'culture' played a major part in creating an environment that led to thousands of Sikh girls being groomed and abused, as well as openly promoting alcoholism and all manner of gundghee. Not to mention the general low brow nature of it all. 

I can't stand anything about it, past or present. Seeing it, makes me want to vomit. If I had my way, I'd execute anyone dressed in that way just as a precautionary measure.   It disgusts me in a way I couldn't really articulate in words. It sort of perfectly captures our current, underdeveloped, backwards state, and feels like a slap in our face. 

Rant over. 

I get what you're trying to convey. I don't like the bright, heavily decorated look of Chaddra that Bhangra people wear, it looks terrible. I don't support Bhangra, gigs or alcoholism at all and don't consider it "culture". 

I like the look if its worn as an actual every day garment, rather than a decorated silly over the top costume. And they weren't brightly coloured back in the days. They were usually all plain white or neutral/beige coloured as fabric was kept natural (like the tint of natural hand spun Khaddar) 

image.png.10408f03ee9988924ff77f9f29e0b708.png

 

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