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UK Paghs

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Full voile is good for this style. Rubia voile tends to be a  much thicker and heavier material.

F 74 Amritsari mal mal is also very soft and light....

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Most Sikhs in the UK tie the Kenyan style pagh because most turban-wearing Sikhs in the UK are tarkhans whose family roots go back to Kenya (or other parts of East Africa).

Note that tarkhans make up a majority of turban-wearing Sikhs in the UK even though in the general Sikh population (turban wearers and monay), tarkhans are heavily outnumbered by jatts. This just illustrates how pathetic jatts are. (Note: I am jatt.) 

The few young men from non-tarkhan backgrounds who do wear paghs tend to also wear the Kenyan style. This is because they'd rather fit in with their young peers who also wear paghs (most of whom are tarkhans wearing the Kenyan style) than look like the two or three jatt uncles at the gurdwara who wear Punjabi style paghs. (Examples: Jassi Sidhu, Jay Singh Sohal, etc.)

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4 hours ago, californiasardar1 said:

Most Sikhs in the UK tie the Kenyan style pagh because most turban-wearing Sikhs in the UK are tarkhans whose family roots go back to Kenya (or other parts of East Africa).

Note that tarkhans make up a majority of turban-wearing Sikhs in the UK even though in the general Sikh population (turban wearers and monay), tarkhans are heavily outnumbered by jatts. This just illustrates how pathetic jatts are. (Note: I am jatt.) 

The few young men from non-tarkhan backgrounds who do wear paghs tend to also wear the Kenyan style. This is because they'd rather fit in with their young peers who also wear paghs (most of whom are tarkhans wearing the Kenyan style) than look like the two or three jatt uncles at the gurdwara who wear Punjabi style paghs. (Examples: Jassi Sidhu, Jay Singh Sohal, etc.)

Most of them have paghs with goatee beards or chin strap beards   very rare to see one with a full dhari.

Most popular style of dastar in uk among young singhs now is dhumalla, gol dastar  

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Just now, puzzled said:

Most of then have paghs with goatee beards or chin strap beards   very rare to see one with a full dhari.

Most popular style of dastar in uk among young singhs is dhumalla 

Yes, this is true.

But the thread poses a question about UK paghs in general, not just paghs worn by proper singhs.

 

Anyway, the fact that most young Singhs in the UK wear a dumalla (as opposed to a nok wali pagh like the older generation) just shows how little the older generation did to pass on Sikhi to the next generation.

Many young singhs in the UK got into sikhi on their own and therefore adopted the dumalla (perhaps the style most closely associated with traditional sikhi). 

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30 minutes ago, californiasardar1 said:

Yes, this is true.

But the thread poses a question about UK paghs in general, not just paghs worn by proper singhs.

 

Anyway, the fact that most young Singhs in the UK wear a dumalla (as opposed to a nok wali pagh like the older generation) just shows how little the older generation did to pass on Sikhi to the next generation.

Many young singhs in the UK got into sikhi on their own and therefore adopted the dumalla (perhaps the style most closely associated with traditional sikhi). 

Things are changing here man  you can see lots of young singhs in the uk these days.  Older generation knew very little about sikhi themselves and knew more about superstions. Its thanks to people like bhai jagraj singh that so many people got into sikhi 

As for paghs, older generations mostly wear the patiala style pagh while younger singhs wear dhumalla, which these days is the most popular style here.

Boys from families that are from Kenya still wear Kenyan style mostly, but majority of then trim their dharis  in fact it's rare to see one with a full dhari, which defeats the whole purpose! 

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5 hours ago, californiasardar1 said:

Most Sikhs in the UK tie the Kenyan style pagh because most turban-wearing Sikhs in the UK are tarkhans whose family roots go back to Kenya (or other parts of East Africa).

Note that tarkhans make up a majority of turban-wearing Sikhs in the UK even though in the general Sikh population (turban wearers and monay), tarkhans are heavily outnumbered by jatts. This just illustrates how pathetic jatts are. (Note: I am jatt.) 

The few young men from non-tarkhan backgrounds who do wear paghs tend to also wear the Kenyan style. This is because they'd rather fit in with their young peers who also wear paghs (most of whom are tarkhans wearing the Kenyan style) than look like the two or three jatt uncles at the gurdwara who wear Punjabi style paghs. (Examples: Jassi Sidhu, Jay Singh Sohal, etc.)

100% correct.

Everyone I know wears a so-called Kenyan style pagh. It's really British Indian Army style, but let's put aside semantics.

Most people, the youth included, actually wear the Kenyan style. A few do wear the gol style but it's no where in comparison to the Kenyan style. Ratio would be 1:10 if not more. 

Aside from a few elderly individuals*, UK Jatt's are effectively non-turbaned - just ask Jassi Sidhu why he wears a Kenyan turban even though his parents descend from Punjab. His neighbour was Kenyan, his father didn't wear a turban, so he took upon the style of the Kenyans.

The gol pagh has taken root to some degree but given the shear numbers of Kenyan style turbans, and their descendants, there's mathematically zero chance of a takeover. The Kenyan pagh is not a phase but the same can't be said the gol pagh. Only time will tell.

The Patiala shahi or the "Indian style" has no precedence in the UK - jatt's had/have no interest. They're nearly all clean-shaven by default. Aside from a few of their progeny who've been taken in by various Sikh camps, they have no interest.

Walk into any British educational establishment - from Aberdeen to Southampton, it's mostly Kenyan turbans - if any. If you do see a chap wearing an Indian style, he's recently arrived from India. Chances are his children will discard the pagh or, adopt the Kenyan style. Kenyan turbans are 4th generation now.

It's no surprise that all the major legal turban battles in the UK were fought by non-jatt's. Motorcycle helmet in Manchester (Giani Sundar Singh Sagar), caps as part of the bus driver's uniform in Wolverhampton (Tarsem Singh Sandhu - my uncle) or a Brummie school kid being asked to wear a cap as part of the school uniform (Sewa S Mandla). 

Legislation affecting headgear never affects jatt's  -why would it?

Jatt's can mock the Kenyan turban all day long, but it doesn't take away away from the legal fact that today, British Sikhs wear turbans in the High Court or operating theatres or to school or drive buses because non-jatt's decided to not cut their hair and conform.  

Conflict of interest: I wear a British Indian Army style aka Kenyan style pagh. However, my father wear's an Indian/Patiala shahi style.

*many of these individuals were non-turbanned throughout their lives but adopted the pagh upon retirement, maybe born-again-Sikhs or more likely, embarrassing bald patches. 

California Sardar is more informed about the UK pagh than the Sikhs living in the UK. How utterly bizarre.

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On 1/17/2020 at 8:13 PM, puzzled said:

Most of them have paghs with goatee beards or chin strap beards   very rare to see one with a full dhari.

 

It's because their fathers and grandfathers fixoed their dharis to the max, and were too colonialised to have a khulli dhari like a real Khalsa therefore not following rehit even though many of them have taken khanday dee pahul and try and get their children to take pahul at 6 years old. So even with a pagh, they still behaved in a servitude manner to the british/goras.

The descendants are just imitating that, but just doing beadbi of their kesh instead of inhaling toxic fixo fumes!!!

 

oh yeh, also the super-starched pagh that can be taken off and on is also against rehit. A pagh should be tied freshly each time and never taken off like a hat! 

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20 hours ago, DailyMail said:

It's no surprise that all the major legal turban battles in the UK were fought by non-jatt's. Motorcycle helmet in Manchester (Giani Sundar Singh Sagar), caps as part of the bus driver's uniform in Wolverhampton (Tarsem Singh Sandhu - my uncle) or a Brummie school kid being asked to wear a cap as part of the school uniform (Sewa S Mandla). 

Tarsem Singh Sandhu is not jatt?

In any case, your general point still stands.

 

Note that when Sandhu was fighting for his right to wear a path while driving a bus, it was an elderly so-called bhapa (I think his name was Jolly) who stepped up and threatened to set himself on fire in protest. This despite jatts always mocking "bhapay" for being cowardly (and various other things).

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21 hours ago, DailyMail said:

Everyone I know wears a so-called Kenyan style pagh. It's really British Indian Army style, but let's put aside semantics.

Most people, the youth included, actually wear the Kenyan style. A few do wear the gol style but it's no where in comparison to the Kenyan style. Ratio would be 1:10 if not more. 

really!!!??

around here most young people either have dhumalla/gol dastar or just wear a patka      maybe like 15 yrs ago kenyan/british style was more common.

see any video on youtube of nagar kirtans, samagams and other events and you will see dhumallas/gol dastars.   

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33 minutes ago, ipledgeblue said:

 

It's because their fathers and grandfathers fixoed their dharis to the max, and were too colonialised to have a khulli dhari like a real Khalsa therefore not following rehit even though many of them have taken khanday dee pahul and try and get their children to take pahul at 6 years old. So even with a pagh, they still behaved in a servitude manner to the british/goras.

The descendants are just imitating that, but just doing beadbi of their kesh instead of inhaling toxic fixo fumes!!!

 

oh yeh, also the super-starched pagh that can be taken off and on is also against rehit. A pagh should be tied freshly each time and never taken off like a hat! 

its rare to see one with a full dhari     they just have goatees or other weird designs.    them paghs are so starched that they actually move around like a hat on the head,  i knew this one kenyan singh and he could move his pagh around while it was still on his head because it was so stiff 

gelling your dhari or using other products just completely damages it, i worked with a afghani sikh guy briefly he used some product that completely plastered his dhari to his face, his dhari had patches all over it!  his mustache hair was really damaged and almost gone   looked like a muslim mustache!  dont know why people do that to their dharis 

using strong products can also make your dhari go grey a lot earlier as well. 

 

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10 hours ago, puzzled said:

really!!!??

around here most young people either have dhumalla/gol dastar or just wear a patka      maybe like 15 yrs ago kenyan/british style was more common.

see any video on youtube of nagar kirtans, samagams and other events and you will see dhumallas/gol dastars.   

Times are changing. 

The Sikh diaspora takes it cues from UK Sikhs. 

I remember in the 90's,  Singh's in the UK wore caps. My mama did not like my cousin doing that.

If you were to go to Delhi during the 90's  you would never see the Urban Sikhs wear a baseball cap.

By the time of the millenium, a lot of Delhi Sikhs were seen wearing them.

Whatever happens with UK Sikhs first then seems to catch on with Sikhs in other place 10-15 years later. 

The UK Sikhs have come to a saturation point it seems. Been there, done that, got the T-Shirt and the mug.

 

 

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