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Found 185 results

  1. Waheguru ji ke khalsa wahiguru ji ki fateh i understand and agree that the Akaal Bunga is the head of the Panth but could I have some quotes and itihaas to back this up thanks
  2. Importance Of Amrit Sanchar: http://gurukisikhi.weebly.com/home/importance-of-amrit-sanchar
  3. Please could someone clarify : 1. if Sri Guru Granth Sahib ji , Dasam Guru Granth ji and Sarbloh Granth combine to bring knowledge that mean the ant of Vedas , does that mean any prophecies there post advent of Khalsa is wrong /to be ignored ? 2. Does this mean that as I have heard someplaces that Khalsa Raj is kaliki avatar ?
  4. To quote a portion: 'The seven years, from 1708-1716, which chart the meteoric rise and execution of Banda Singh Bahadur are a testament to the rugged individualism and grit of the Sikhs. They reflect a prominent pattern of Sikh history viz. the ascent, descent and the re-ascent of the Khalsa over it’s foes. As memories of June 1984 loom ever closer, it would be prudent for Sikhs worldwide to reflect upon the revolutions of both Banda and the Sikhs of ’84 and attempt to identify the similarities in both. It is a given that no two movements can ever be fully compared or even contrasted, but a general consensus can always be agreed upon vis-a-vis their effect and ultimate conclusion. The forced demise of Banda Singh’s revolution did not put it’s spirit to sleep; rather it only bolstered the Sikh spirit and the Khalsa continued it’s struggle for sovereignty and religious freedom in the wilderness of the Punjab. Post-’84, the Sikhs failed to derive inspiration from their past and rather focused solely upon the trauma of ’84. As such, their history was brought to a premature conclusion on the events of the aforementioned period. One need only imagine what the result would have been if the post-Banda Sikhs had focused solely upon their treatment at the hands of the Mughals, rather than taking any conducive steps towards preserving themselves from such atrocities in the future.' https://tisarpanthdotcom.wordpress.com/2016/06/03/the-stalwarts-revolution/
  5. I am asking this question as I am unsure as to whether Shaheed Singh's or Kaur's actually get mukht/liberated from becoming shaheed, as Gurbani provides no evidence of this? I understand that the Chali Mukte got liberated by Satguru Sri Gobind Singh Ji, and other shaheeds like Baba Banda Singh Bahadur. But lets forget puratan times because I know all the shaheeds then were brahm gianis but what about from 1984 and ownards? The reason I am asking this is because I recently attended an akath katha where the guy was standing up and explaining how to meet Vaheguru through Gurbani. He even went to explain what manmat is, showing a presentation slide full of manmat 'tools' like a mala and presented Gurbani pangtiya which state and show that using a mala is wrong. However what struck me most is when the guy doing the katha clearly stated that someone who becomes 'shaheed' will not get liberated and not meet Truth, as they have not recognized naam. As before, he presented the Gurbani pangti to prove what he is saying. I can't remember the pangti in Gurmukhi but it translates in English to something like "and they who die on the battlefield, will also not become liberated". It translated to something along those lines. I personally think that he misused the pangti to suit his own needs for the sake of the presentation. But thats what I want to know, is it true that a Shaheed won't get mukht? Is he just dying for the sake of the panth? However before I heard many times that Guru Gobind Singh Ji said something along the lines of "He who dies fighting for the panth will instantly get a throne in my kingdom, or God's kingdom" even though I haven't found a direct source to this. Is this true? Did Satguru Ji say this? I'm surprised nobody in the sangat spoke out against this, they all seemed to be under some kind of control as they guy seemed pretty intimidating to say the least.
  6. Before setting for heavenly abode, Sri Guru Gobind Singh, the tenth Guru, the founder of order of Khalsa brotherhood, conferred the Guruship to Sri Granth Sahib as a living Guru of Khalsa. He then sang his self-composed hymn: "Agya bhai Akal ki tabhi chalayo Panth Sabh Sikhan ko hukam hai Guru manyo Granth Guru Granth Ji manyo pargat Guran ki deh Jo Prabhu ko milbo chahe khoj shabad mein le Raj karega Khalsa aqi rahei na koe Khwar hoe sabh milange bache sharan jo hoe." Raj Karega Khalsa - The Khalsa shall have Rule and Reign Now, look at the state of the Khalsa today. Who seriously thinks the Khlasa could rule the world in the state we are in! Individually, socially or as a community! I'm actually struggling to think of anything the Khalsa does and could rule / reign over today! Major companies? No. Senate? No. We are lacking so much and personally I believe we are SO beyond par on a global scale when compared to how much the world has advanced - it would be a joke if the Khalsa was to take charge today. The world would reject us, we would fail our Raj. The bitter truth is the world doesn't need Khalsa Raj in it's current form and state. It's doing fine without us. And until we don't up our game, the would will never need, nor want Khalsa Raj, nor will the Khalsa have it.
  7. An article exploring the true genesis of the Sikh Warrior-Saint ideal. To quote the hypothesis: 'A creature of classic Indic thought, it was hard for Tagore to comprehend that in Nanakian philosophy spiritual freedom naturally leads to political liberty. The Guru criticized the Siddhs, of Tantric Buddhism, for acquiring some spiritual gains but not utilizing them for the betterment of society at large. (6) It is evident, however, that even centuries after the Guru’s edicts were in circulation the odium attached to force and politics were still in power and men like Tagore were their blind prey. What was Guru Nanak Dev Ji’s perspective on force and it’s utilization? In order to truly understand this query, and subsequently manifest an answer, we will approach it from several various directions.' To read more, visit: https://tisarpanthdotcom.wordpress.com/2016/02/09/the-warrior-who-was-nanak/
  8. I feel as if there is a lot of tension in the panth at the moment. With Bapu Surat Singh Jee's hunger strike, Jathedars pardon Ram Rahim, Sarbat Khalsa, etc. I have a feeling something big in Sikh History will take place very soon. I think we have reached a sort of boiling point. Does anyone else feel the same as I do? Or is it just me? These recent events have sort of given me a change in energy and mood whenever I hear any news.
  9. ਖ਼ਾਲਸਾ ਅਕਾਲ ਪ੝ਰਖ ਕੀ ਫ਼ੌਜ ॥ khhalasa akal purakh kee fauj Khalsa is God's army ਪ੝ਰਗਟਿਓ ਖ਼ਾਲਸਾ ਪ੝ਰਮਾਤਮ ਕੀ ਮੌਜ ॥ pragattiou khhalasa pramatham kee moj and it was created by His Will. Guru Gobind Singh ji Amrit keertan Ang 291 http://www.sikhsangat.com/index.php?/topic/8866-shabad-in-dasam-granth/
  10. Waheguru Ji Ka Khalsa, Waheguru Ji Ki Fateh Ji A new Short Movie on Rakhdi (ਰਖੜੀ) : Thread Of Strength - By Sikh Feed This video explains why and how we should celebrate Rakhdi festival. Let people know the philosophy of Guru Gobind Singh Ji. SHARE it if you like it. Our Youtube Channel - http://www.youtube.com/SikhFeed Thanks Alot !! Waheguru Ji Ka Khalsa Waheguru Ji Ki Fateh Ji
  11. just had this drop on my feed , apparently officially Baba Dalip 'Singh' has officially rejoined panth and has given hukhamnama to his followers to do same and have Guru of Guru Granth Sahib, I feel mixed on this: 1. having seen them greeting RSS peeps in photos recently taken 2. they have not retaken amrit from Panj just put on kirpan anyway here's the link, tell me what you reckon: https://www.facebook.com/ASRPM/posts/1614584432125884
  12. This book written by Dr. Harbhajan Singh answers ALL questions on Dasam pita's bani If you have guts, read it before putting any efforts to comment.
  13. Inspiring Singhs to make health related changes in their lives for the greater good of the Khalsa Panth. #InspringSinghs #BuildingAnArmy #BarbellJatha Join the Army!! Facebook: Singh Strength Barbell Jatha Instagram: @BarbellJatha -- Sikh Youth Federation Email: info@thesyf.com Facebook: Sikh Youth Federation Twitter: @ExperienceSikhi Instagram: @sikhyouthfederation SoundCloud: https://soundcloud.com/thesyf Youtube: Sikh Youth Federation
  14. I am not contending against the positive, and negative, factions here regarding the manifestation of the Devi by Guru Gobind Singh Ji. What I would like to offer is a fresh perspective on this event and analyse it's plausible evolution. Please read my article before commenting. Thank you! I am colouring in all the quotes and important bits. Kalika at the Anandpur Court. The dual forms of Kalika, as a puritanical mother and pristine warrior, amalgamated in a sixteenth century India to birth a third more socio-political form, that of Goddess granting sovereignty. The latter perception emerged during a troubled milieu. Perpetual invasions, of the sub-continent, had reduced it's Aboriginals to the status of slaves trampled under the military foot of Islamic conquerors. Kalika's mythos, as a penultimate resort of salvation, endeared her to the indigenous monarchy which adopted her as a tool to measure their own right to reign and successes. Yet the question remained, who would this political Goddess elect to subdue and expel the Mohammedan foe? It was a significant query not lost on Akali-Nihung Guru Gobind Singh Ji, who decided to utilise it for the Khalsa and the latter's political pursuits. Evolving exegetical perceptions, in historic and contemporary Khalsa politics, have played a crucial role in shaping the standard outlook on many traditional aspects of the latter. As Purnima Dhavan elucidates, 'while the narrative content of the recent Sikh past appears to achieve a more concrete narrative by the end of the 18th century, the meanings derived from this past occupied a contested terrain as the exegetical traditions within Sikhism became diverse.' (1) Kalika is an adroit example of the latter citation. Fenech contends that the Kalika, for the Khalsa, was initially not a spiritual metaphor but a political aide. In this he is supported by Alison Busch and Robin Rhinehart. Both scholars contend that the adoption of Kalika, in the court and works of Akali-Nihung Guru Gobind Singh Ji, was a political manoeuvre calculated to preserve his own patrimony and also empower his fiefdom. Busch affirms that the origins of the Khalsa-Kalika relationship lie in the Guru's adoption of a courtly ethic. He wanted to connect his court with that of the Mughal-Rajput courts not only in grandeur but also fashion. Despite the Guru's articulation of a distinct ethos, from that of both Islam and Hinduism, he was an ardent celebrator of his pluralistic heritage; and employed it arbitrarily. Fenech believes that the latter enabled him to, 'reassure them (the local inhabitants) that while the Sikhs, and their Guru, articulated a different dharmic-or religious- and ideological vision... they were nevertheless sensitive to local tradition...' (2) Thus, in such a milieu, he (the Guru) set about adopting and re-designing local traditions and customs to fit in with Khalsa dictums. The celebration of Diwalia, and Dusshera, evidence this but there was also another social reason for this. A distinct populace, of the Guru's own apostles were drawn from amongst the agrarian Jats. The latter, an agriculturalist class, often engaged the neighbouring Rajputs in violent combat over ideological and territorial matters. Ratan Singh Bhangu evidences the latter, in his Prachin Panth Prakash, when he cites the Guru's refusal to unite his Kingly neighbours and lead them against the Islamic tyrant. Instead, as per Bhangu, he decides to re-structure the militant mentality of the Jats, and Shudras, and bestow sovereignty upon them. (3) This affirmation of suzerainty orbited one pivotal complication. How to convince the oppressed peasants that they were regal material? How to eradicate an almost centuries-old psyche that they were nothing more than the dredges of a radical religiosity? To this end the Guru adopted Kalika. His neighbouring domains were ringed with temples paying obeisance to the Goddess. Each structure depicted it's patron receiving a sword from the Goddess herself, affirming the his right to reign over his wards. She was well ingrained in the minds of his apostles, and to this end the Akali-Nihung re-birthed her legend for his own purposes. Busch notes that the Dasam, and Sarbloh, Granths' employ Kalika in a metaphorical capacity. Microscopic attention is paid to her battles, but in a major contrast to simultaneous renderings, the works of the Guru depict no reverential undertone towards the Goddess. For him she is nothing more than another warrior, attempting to restore a semblance of peace to the divided heavens. It was the link between Kalika and sovereignty, which served the Guru so well, that lead to Udasi Sukkha Singh proclaiming, 'an immense effort was expanded in procuring the presence of Kalika. No sight of her manifestation could be obtained. In this current milieu of degeneracy, no other group at the time had made her appear within the world other than the Khalsa.' (3) This manifestation of the Kalika is an event not located in either the Dasam Granth, the Sarbloh Granth or even the Sri Gur Sobha despite the latter's utilisation of Kalika. Thus, it is proper to conclude that the event is not a creation or even occurrence of the Guru era. Post-Guru era texts such as the Gurbilas series, Chibber's Bansavalinama and other biographies are however replete with the incident. Anne Murphy elucidates upon this variation, 'later Gurbilas texts (attributed to Koer Singh) include Kesar Singh Chibber's Bansavalinama, feature an organizational structure... features strong mythological content and a clearer sense, appropriate to it's time of composition, of political sovereignty in relation to the Mughal state and other smaller Hindu Kings from the Punjab hills.' (4) It is the conclusive element, of her statement, which exegesis the evolving Khalsa-Kalika relationship. Amalgamated with indigenous culture, these later authors wished to provide an indigenous backdrop for the Khalsa's right to sovereignty. Thus Kalika, the divine mother of sovereignty, was employed. Even this metaphorical tale, however, weathered an evolution. It's ultimate form, by the dawn of the nineteenth century, read as an affront to Brahmin orthodoxy. Chibber's rendition of the incident is as follows: -The Akali-Nihung is contacted by Brahmins who come to know his plans to manifest the Khalsa. They ask him to join their Havan, and assist in manifesting Kalika to aid him. - The Akali-Nihung readily agrees, but once atop Naina-Devi proves the falsity of their beliefs and instead summons a much rawer, much aggressive form of Kalika. -This form bestows him with a cleaver, and assures him that she will lend his Khalsa the support it requires to uproot the Mughals. -Subsequently, in his exegesis of Uggardanti, he alludes 'the panth was manifested to uproot the Turks (Muslims).' (5) His account, amongst others, evidences several points amongst them being: 1.) Early Khalsa historians were often adept at utilising local, and national, myths to justify their own right to prowess. 2.) The myth of Kalika's manifestation, despite being ambiguous, is also figurative. Chibber, and his companions, wished to depict to their Hindu counterparts that the Khalsa had more of a right to reign than them after the Islamic invader was expelled. Thus Sukkha Singh's proclamation, '...no other group at the time had made her appear within the world other than the Khalsa.' (6) 3.) These writers often perceived themselves as being sub-continental traditionalists and utilised this factor in their works. Their land was the abode of Dharma, and as such was sacrosanct for it's content. In the words of Rhinehart, 'the goddess (Kalika) is something of an outsider to the Hindu pantheon; when the Gods are in trouble, she is the option of last resort, a fierce fighter, a protector. She stands somewhat apart from the social order of the Gods, but is ready to step in when needed... This is not unlike the way some Sikhs came to see themselves. Fighters and defenders of Indian culture, but not exactly within the Hindu fold.' (7) 4.) This event became an opiate, and a justification, for the peasantry's revolt under the Khalsa. Utilising sub-continental myths, the Khalsa promised to engineer an era emulating that of Ram-Chandra and Krishna; demi-gods who ruled as mortals and assured perfectness. Kalika became an important component of this vision, as it was with her blessings that both Ram-Chandra and Krishna achieved their reigns; and the Khalsa would too. The conclusive say on the matter however remains the Akali-Nihung's. For him sovereignty, in figurative terms, was bestowed upon that individual who was a possessor of prowess and a master of war. Thus one finds him saying, in theSri Bhagauti Astotar, 'grant this blessing of suzerainty to I your slave. Always protect me the Guru, Shah (an imperial title), Gobind!' (8) For him Kalika was ever-present in the form of the sword, and as such a perpetual verification of his right to reign. His later apostles would re-vamp this vision to achieve a fine balance between indigenous mythology, and historic justification. As Murphy contends, Chibber and Koer Singh were not hampered by European notions of time and thus wove myth, religion and reality into one semblance. (9) But it is Dhavan who retains the conclusive say on the matter. Busch pinpoints the political appeal of Kalika, citing that the latter was misinterpreted to say that, 'the Guru reverenced the Goddess.' (10) But the exegetical variation is highlighted by Dhavan who so readily contends, '...the meanings derived from this past occupied (and still occupy) a contested terrain as the exegetical traditions within Sikhism became diverse!' (11) Sources: (1) Murphy Anne; (2012) The Materiality of the Past: History and Representation in the Sikh Tradition. Oxford University press, NY, USA. pg. 93-94. (2) Fenech E. Louis; (2013) The Sikh Zafar-namah of Guru Gobind Singh: A Discursive Blade in the Heart of the Mughal Empire. Oxford University press, NY, USA. pg. 5-6. (3) ibid, pg. 6. (4) Murphy Anne; (2012) The Materiality of the Past: History and Representation in the Sikh Tradition. Oxford University press, NY, USA. pg. 92-93. (5) Accessed from http://sikh-reality.blogspot.co.nz/2010/04/bansavalinama-ugardanthi-explanation.html (6) Fenech E. Louis; (2013) The Sikh Zafar-namah of Guru Gobind Singh: A Discursive Blade in the Heart of the Mughal Empire. Oxford University press, NY, USA. pg. 6. (7) ibid pg. 7. (8) Akali-Nihung Guru Gobind Singh Ji, Sri Bhagauti Astotar, Dasam Granth. (This Bani is omitted in modern Dasam Granth publications under the aegis of the SGPC). (9) Murphy Anne; (2012) The Materiality of the Past: History and Representation in the Sikh Tradition. Oxford University press, NY, USA. pg. 94-95. (10) Fenech E. Louis; (2013) The Sikh Zafar-namah of Guru Gobind Singh: A Discursive Blade in the Heart of the Mughal Empire. Oxford University press, NY, USA. pg. 7. (11) Murphy Anne; (2012) The Materiality of the Past: History and Representation in the Sikh Tradition. Oxford University press, NY, USA. pg. 93-94.
  15. With Maharaj's Kirpa I aim to do more such pieces: http://tisarpanth.blogspot.co.nz/2015/08/guardians-of-gobind_16.html?view=magazine
  16. Does one have to be a Sikh to join the Khalsa? I can imagine "Mohammad Singh" or "Mata Teresa Kaur"... When the Khalsa takes rule and ushers in Satya Yuga, Guru Nanak says that there will be one religion - the Khalsa (in Rajnama and Karninama). Sikhs have respect for all faiths, and I feel that the Khalsa isn't just beyond caste, color, gender, or sexual oreintation, but is also beyond religion. The Khalsa is a thin path to follow of righteousness and being a sant-sipahi (warrior-saint), but it isn't restricted to Sikhs. What do you the Khalsa Panth yourselves think?
  17. Waheguru ji ka khalsa Waheguru ji ki Fateh just read this article and it fills me with hope that the panth will start acting on Guru Gobind SIngh's advice and come together again under Guru Granth Sahib ji, your thoughts? http://dailysikhupdates.com/namdhari-head-expels-thakur-dalip-singh-for-pledging-to-join-khalsa-panth/
  18. Is there any specific shade of blue for the Khalsa? Is it Just any shade of blue? What shade of blue do Nihang Singhs wear? If possible, please provide the numbers for the colour of sRGB (Red Green Blue) Thanks In Advance, Sr Waheguru Jee Kee Fateh!
  19. Sri Guru Gobind Singh Ji administered Amrit in front of thousands to the initial Panj Piarey and consecutive Amritdharis, so when did this practice of administering Amrit out of the sight of the sangat commence?
  20. Waheguru Breaking: Namdhari Leader Wants to Join Khalsa Panth(DSU News Bureau) 3 June 2015- Namdhari leader Thakur Dalip Singh and his followers arrived at Hassanpur, Punjab to visit Bapu Surat Singh Khalsa and to express his willingness to join Khalsa Panth. Bapu Ji was arrested by police and taken to the hospital for force feeding. Although, Thakur Dalip Singh couldn’t meet with Bapu Ji but he met with Sangarsh committee leaders and expressed unity for the cause. It is important to point out that not all Sikh groups under the Akal Takht have come in support of Bapu Surat Singh Khalsa nor have they visited him. Thakur Dalip Singh isn’t the head of the Namdhari community but an estimated 80% of Namdharis follow him. The important points towards unity were the following: 1) Namdhari Leader Thakur Dalip Singh has told his followers to use the word Guru while saying Guru Granth Sahib Ji as before his followers pronounced Aad Sri Granth Sahib. 2) They have agreed to use the Fateh greeting as before it wasn’t always used. 3) Majhbhi Sikhs have been given equal rights as before they ate langar separately and were treated unequally, but now those Majhbhi Sikhs that are Naamdhari will be treated equally according to Thakur Dalip Singh. 4) Thakur Dalip Singh has pledged to support Khalsa Raj and a separate Khalsa State. 5) Thakur Dalip Singh has organized a program in the past where Panthic groups were present. In that program, the theme was for unity of various Sikh groups for a common cause. Also, in that program the Dohara ‘Agia Bhaei Akal Ki’ was read and names of only the ten Sikh Gurus were said which has never happened before among the Naamdharis. Thakur Dalip Singh further pledged to join the Khalsa Panth and to follow it’s Rehats. The historic meeting for unity is being recognized as a turning point to achieve long avoided goals of the Panth. taken from: http://dailysikhupdates.com/breaking-namdhari-leader-wants-to-join-khalsa-panth/
  21. so i do A level philosophy and im in a class with 3 other people. 2 athiests ans 1 agnostic. We do alot of political philosophy and we disscuss things like whether libery or equality should be core priorities of the state etc. its interesting but its hard to come up with one answer. so i was wondering what the sikh state would look like. the khalsa was formed to rule n save the world essentially and i tried to discuss this in my lesson which started a debate. i was arguing that our state would be one which instead of capitalism and money at its core would have spirituality. i was arguing for a society simmilar to platos philosopher king, with guru granth sahib ji mahraj at the top and the punj pyare as like the prime ministers. i argued that this state would be better than any other state because it places the enphsis on something internal (Dasam duar) rather than materalistic things like money, the athiests said that this would be a society which favorited the religious and we wouldnt be modernisng and going forward but going backwards, and that the spiritual people at the top (punj pyare) would become corrupt. but i said hat sikhi was different coz its an enclusive religion and wouldnt have a problem with any other belief system or faith or would not contradict anyone. also our ideology is to serve the world, we wouldnt be serving everyone by picking favorites but there were many pragmatic issues highligted to me with my conception of the sikh state this was only my interpritation of the sikh state with my limited knowledge of sikhi thru bhai jigraj singh ji and russell brand lol, i came across alot of practical issues that wouldnt be work in a complex society like todays. i wanted to know some more eeducated descriptions of how a sikh state would look as were proberbly gonna continue this debate in tomorows lesson lol thanks waheguru ji ka khalsa, waheguru ji ki fateh
  22. Chaos erupted inside Turlock Gurdwara Sahib in California after a Taksali Singh asked Prof Sarbjit Singh Dhunda a question on Dasam Granth. The question revolved around the maryada of Akal Takht Sahib on Dasam Granth and whether parcharaks are allowed to protest against it. After the question was asked a person with Sarbjit Singh Dhunda somehow felt offended and walked out of the Gurdwara. Sikh sangat became upset on why the question wasn’t fully answered and the urge to leave. Some members of the sangat felt Prof Dhunda was corned on the topic while some said he avoided the questions. SIKH24 OP/ED Do you believe that Professor Sahib Singh’s teeka is the best ever written on Guru Granth Sahib Ji Dhunda: Yes Do you believe that everything written in Guru Granth Sahib Ji is true or not? After some thought, Dhunda answers yes. Do you believe in 8.4 million lives and if there is a life after death or if the soul continues its journey? Dhunda is not able to answer this because he believes there is nothing after life and God has only created us to be better human beings. Dhunda’s explanations are then questioned by references from various shabads in Guru Granth Sahib. Over and over, it is mentioned that there is an after life and what we do, we will have to repent. After this was the biggest question - Do you believe in the super natural concepts mentioned in Guru Granth Sahib Ji? And do you believe that these were just written or those events actually took place? Dhunda answers, however he tries to be smart. He questions that how can a fish go in the air and how can a cow be back alive after it was dead? Responding to Dhunda’s questions, Singhs mention that Professor Sahib Singh and other scholars have all said and interpreted those gurbani verses in the way that those incidents have occurred just how they have been written. S. Kulwant Singh states that if God wants, anything is possible. So if that means the cow was alive again according to Gurbani, then it was, because God made that happen to show and honor the protection of his devotees. After this, Bhai Amarbir Singh from Manteca asked the following question - Does any Sikh parcharak have the right, according to Akal Takht Sahib to openly condemn Sri Dasam Granth? Dhunda asks that the Singhs provide him proof where he has gone against Akal Takht Sahib. Amarbir Singh mentioned that Dhunda has done so many times and there are many recordings. However, during the debate, Dhunda then cleverly changes topic and Balraj Singh, Dhunda’s main sponsor from Patterson gets up and says this was not part of the debate today. Singhs however stated that we are not asking if Sri Dasam Granth is right or wrong, it is only asked if according to our Akal Takht Maryada, is it right to condemn Dasam Granth. After this, Dhunda and his supporters get up try to leave the debate. However, Singhs pose the next question - Do you believe that doing Waheguru Simran is a waste of time and if that had any meaning for the after life. In response, Dhunda pauses for a moment, and then finally answers that Simran is only for us to get a peace of mind here in this world and that he doesn’t know if it has any meaning after since he has not died yet. Singhs insist that over and over, Guru Granth Sahib Ji answers this there is a meaning and without the recitation of God, no one will find the door of liberation at the God’s court, unless God chooses otherwise. So that being, what right does Dhunda have to say Waheguru Simran is pretty much a waste of time? Conclusion These were the basic questions Dhunda could not answer because he does not believe in these concepts. While is it is of utmost important to live a perfect life, it is important to also live life in a way as prescribed by the Gurus, ie. by recitation and understanding of Gurbani and by doing naam simran, keeping rehit, etc. If after life was not important, then why wear a dastar, keep a beard, keep rehit, take amrit?
  23. In the month of April, Sikh world celebrates Vaisakhi - the day when foundation of Khalsa was laid by Guru Gobind Singh Ji. Here is a beautiful Infographic by Sikh Stage that shows the basics of Vaisakhi and its history. For more Sikh Infographics, follow Sikh Stage on facebook - facebook.com/SikhStage Click here to read - http://on.fb.me/1CK1u0V
  24. (April 17, 2015)—Moninder Singh, a well-respected Sikh youth activist was arrested earlier today during a protest outside Ross Street Gurdwara in Vancouver. A number of Sikh youth, along with representative of various organizations arrived outside the Gurdwara to protest the arrival of Modi for his role in massacres of Muslims in Gujarat. Modi Government is also responsible for carrying out attacks on various other minorities in India. Jakara Movement, a Sikh Youth organization stated that Moninder Singh was arrested for exercising freedom of speech. Canadian police also threatened to arrest others who were at the Gurdwara. Moninder Singh was asked to leave by the police, however he refused and continued to protest peacefully when he was arrested. Sangat members were denied entry to the Gurdwara by the police. “We are being asked to leave the premises. We are denying, we are rejecting the police telling us to move. They are gearing up to push us out,” said a youth outside the Ross Street Gurdwara. Source http://www.sikh24.com/2015/04/17/breaking-canadian-police-arrests-sikh-youth-leader-during-peaceful-protest-against-narendra-modi/#.VTCkhPnF9K0 Extra videos from the Modi protest at Candian Gurdwara:https://www.youtube.com/user/jakara/videos
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