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SargunNN

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About SargunNN

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    Peevo Pahul Khanday Dhaar

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  1. Perhaps you are right, but I find it hard to believe the various references to these symbols throughout Gurbani is so shallow, and just for purposes of making it digestible to the people of that time. I would think their inclusion is worth exploring at a deeper level. Other commenters have pointed out in regards to dasam bani specifically, how it has meaning on multiple dimensions, and I would agree with that view.
  2. Maybe. Personally I feel Waheguru is both formless and formed as the concept of Sargun and Nirgun tries to illustrate. I try to focus on both in meditation.
  3. I really don't understand the whole obsession over idol worship. People here take it to an extreme and seem to think it means all symbolism should be removed from Sikhi and the religion should become as austere and shallow as modern-day Islam. Obviously, mindless idol worship is bad, everyone would agree with this (including Hindus), but its also obvious Hindu symbology had a spiritual influence on the gurus, and if you actually do naam jaap you'll find you can engage with these symbols in a way that is deeper than idol worship. Any personal practice of sikhi that doesn't even attempt t
  4. It seems like there was always an undercurrent of division but relative peace was possible. The division was seemingly exacerbated opportunistically by both Muslim elite and the British, to the point of extreme violence and to the point now where co-existence seems impossible. 70 years in the partitioned nations has radically changed the ideology of South Asian Muslims, whereas before there was some religious fluidity, now they are vehemently opposed to all Sikh or Hindu tradition. I now frequently wonder what it would take just to reach that previous state of relative peace. A lot of the
  5. It seems like there was always an undercurrent of division but relative peace was possible. The division was seemingly exacerbated opportunistically by both Muslim elite and the British, to the point of extreme violence and to the point now where co-existence seems impossible. 70 years in the partitioned nations has radically changed the ideology of South Asian Muslims, whereas before there was some religious fluidity, now they are vehemently opposed to all Sikh or Hindu tradition. I now frequently wonder what it would take just to reach that previous state of relative peace. A lot of the
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