Jump to content

Pyara

Members
  • Content Count

    867
  • Joined

  • Last visited

  • Days Won

    15

Pyara last won the day on July 11 2012

Pyara had the most liked content!

Community Reputation

288 Excellent

6 Followers

About Pyara

  • Rank
    Mohay Naa Bisaaro Mai Jan Thayraa

Profile Information

  • Gender
    Male
  1. 1984 Remembrance Programme - Ilford Friday 6 June 2014 6.45pm to 7.45pm Kirtan by Bhai Seva Singh and Bhai Harsimran Singh Lalli 7.45pm to 9.00pm Katha by Bhai Manvir Singh Gurdwara Singh Sabha Seven Kings 722-730 High Road, Ilford, Essex. IG3 8SX #SikhGenocide84
  2. Lol, Next we'll be saying that the Government didn't dredge the rivers so that Khalsa Aid would have to go down and divert all the Sikhs seva so that Sikhs would loose interest in any push for an international inquiry...Beat that conspiracy theory!
  3. I disagree. I felt the interview technique was to use an aggressive ambush without allowing the interviewee to finish his points. It wasn’t a political debate as the interviewer hijacked the bulk of the discussion. I agree that the interviewer showed some intelligence and made many valid points, but the approach and environment was not the place. This whole counterproductive approach of showing up others has become synonymous in these overnight newbies who have recently become 1984 scholars. Where were these experts over the last 30 years when the real taboos and risks existed about discussing 1984. It was the Sikh Federation, British Sikh Council, NSo/Lord Singh, Dr Rai, Kashmir Singh, the oldies who have kept the candle lit. So to come on TV after the storm has passed, and simply ambush without having intervened or made efforts to attend panthic meetings or national Gurdwara meetings just shows egocentricity. I can’t tell you how many people have come on record to take credit for the David Cameron statement. At the end of the day, we’re all working towards the bigger objectives. We need to sync ourselves and support each other. There will be bandwagons, evolution of thought and approaches, back tracking, rectification and apologies. You won’t get perfection and these things happen... and as a community we have not, and are not, investing in full time Governance so everything is done on voluntary basis. The result of part time hours being invested are “part time” results so it’s up to those of us who are serious to change that. It's easy to hold others accountable as it masks our own inactivity.
  4. An inspiring picture from yesterday on this link. http://www.demotix.com/node/2136872?lbclear=73
  5. Sikh Council UK …PRESS RELEASE…PRESS RELEASE… PRESS RELEASE…PRESS RELEASE… Sikh Council call on Prime Minister to Lobby for Prof. Bhullar Representatives of the Sikh Council UK yesterday (18.04.13) attended a reception to celebrate Vaisakhi at 10 Downing Street. During the reception they presented a letter to Prime Minister David Cameron thanking him for all the good work the Government is doing in respect of Sikhs and requesting him to make representations to the Indian Government about the case of Professor Davinderpal Singh Bhullar. The Vaisakhi reception at 10 Downing Street was being held for the third year running and Sikhs from across the UK have been invited to attend. The event comes after the visit by Prime Minister David Cameron to Amritsar and two recent debates in the UK parliament about British Sikhs and the death penalty in India. Gurmel Singh, Secretary General said, “I wish to put on record my appreciation for the excellent work being carried out by the Government and other parliamentarians on behalf of and with British Sikhs. I also take this opportunity to congratulate everybody on the occasion of Vaisakhi and to express the appreciation held by the British Sikh community for hosting and organising today’s event.” The event was attended by around 200 invited guests from around the UK with the highlight being a Kirtan recital by 20 youngsters from the Gurmat Sangeet Academy from Leamington Spa. This was followed by an Ardas performed by Giani Charanjeet Singh who is the Head Granthi at Gurdwara Sahib Leamington & Warwick. Giani Ji, said “this was the first time the Sikh Ardas has been performed at the British Prime Minister’s residence, I am humbled and very proud that we were able to pray together in the spirit of, sarbat the Bhalla”. Parminder Singh Birdi said, prime minister spoke sincerely and recognised the immense contribution that British Sikhs make to the United Kingdom and he paid Sikhism ultimate respect by endorsing the Sikh values of Namm Japna ( Meditation), Kirat Karni ( Earning honest living) and Vand Shakna ( Sharing with needy)” During the event, a letter was presented to Prime Minister David Cameron, congratulating him and his Government on recent events and highlighting the issue of Prof. Bhullar whose appeal to commute his death sentence has been refused by the Indian Supreme Court. The letter explained the concerns of the Sikh community and other human rights organisations and asked the Prime Minister to make representations to the Indian Government on this issue. Gurinder Singh - Spokesperson said, “Prof Bhullar’s death sentence has been the subject of a great deal of concern amongst the Sikh community. We have recently had a demonstration outside the Indian High Commission, a lobby of Parliament and a demonstration is continuing outside Downing Street. Whilst this event was organised as a celebration of Vaisakhi, I felt it appropriate to let the Prime Minister know of our concerns.” He added, “Many MP’s have been working very hard on this in recent days including Paul Uppal MP and John Spellar MP who have both been in liaison with the Foreign Office and are hopeful of a constructive dialogue between the British and Indian Governments to advance this most sensitive of issues.” END The Sikh Council UK (SCUK) is the largest representative body of Sikhs in the UK. We are recognised as the national advocate for British Sikhs in the United Kingdom and at the European Union. For information, please contact: Spokesperson Gurinder Singh: 07967 680635 Or email: info@sikhcounciluk.org
  6. Film banned in India - Sadda Haq - draws thousands to Ilford cinema to see story of Punjabi militancy - News - Ilford Recorder http://www.ilfordrecorder.co.uk/news/news/film_banned_in_india_sadda_haq_draws_thousands_to_ilford_cinema_to_see_story_of_punjabi_militancy_1_2020712#sharinganchor ILFORD RECORDER Wednesday, April 17, 2013 9:00 AM A film which has been banned in parts of India for its portrayal of militant groups has been drawing thousands of people to an Ilford cinema. Sadda Haq is a fictional account of a hockey player who joins a militant group which its makers say draws on real-life “torture” against Sikhs in India in the 1980s. It has reportedly been banned by state governments in Punjab and other regions in India but has been bumped up to a larger screen at the Cineworld in Clements Road, with Ilford’s Sikh community flocking to watch it. The Punjabi film, with English subtitles, has drawn fans including Aman Singh, 27, of The Drive, Ilford. He said: “The film shows both sides of the story and I think it’s a great watch. I found myself lost in the storyline, I enjoyed it.” And coach-loads of people went from the Karamsar gurdwara in High Road, Ilford, to the Indian High Commission in London on Monday to protest against the ban. Cllr Balvinder Saund of Seven Kings ward, who said she was one of the first people in line to watch it, said events which inspired it include riots against Sikhs in India in 1984 following the death of Indira Gandhi. She added: “It doesn’t say anything against the Hindu community or any other communities. “It is a voice of conscience.” Ali Raza, Cineworld’s Ilford manager, said the film was originally screened in a 165-seater theatre but was moved to one of the cinema’s largest, holding 300 people, and extra shows have been put on. He said: “With some Bollywood films we can estimate the audience but we can’t predict with some Punjabi films.” A delegation of Hindu organisations reportedly called for it to be permanently banned because they alleged it glorified the Khalistan movement, which wants a separate Sikh country within the Punjab region of South Asia.
  7. Film banned in India - Sadda Haq - draws thousands to Ilford cinema to see story of Punjabi militancy - News - Ilford Recorder http://www.ilfordrecorder.co.uk/news/news/film_banned_in_india_sadda_haq_draws_thousands_to_ilford_cinema_to_see_story_of_punjabi_militancy_1_2020712#sharinganchor ILFORD RECORDER Wednesday, April 17, 2013 9:00 AM A film which has been banned in parts of India for its portrayal of militant groups has been drawing thousands of people to an Ilford cinema. Sadda Haq is a fictional account of a hockey player who joins a militant group which its makers say draws on real-life “torture” against Sikhs in India in the 1980s. It has reportedly been banned by state governments in Punjab and other regions in India but has been bumped up to a larger screen at the Cineworld in Clements Road, with Ilford’s Sikh community flocking to watch it. The Punjabi film, with English subtitles, has drawn fans including Aman Singh, 27, of The Drive, Ilford. He said: “The film shows both sides of the story and I think it’s a great watch. I found myself lost in the storyline, I enjoyed it.” And coach-loads of people went from the Karamsar gurdwara in High Road, Ilford, to the Indian High Commission in London on Monday to protest against the ban. Cllr Balvinder Saund of Seven Kings ward, who said she was one of the first people in line to watch it, said events which inspired it include riots against Sikhs in India in 1984 following the death of Indira Gandhi. She added: “It doesn’t say anything against the Hindu community or any other communities. “It is a voice of conscience.” Ali Raza, Cineworld’s Ilford manager, said the film was originally screened in a 165-seater theatre but was moved to one of the cinema’s largest, holding 300 people, and extra shows have been put on. He said: “With some Bollywood films we can estimate the audience but we can’t predict with some Punjabi films.” A delegation of Hindu organisations reportedly called for it to be permanently banned because they alleged it glorified the Khalistan movement, which wants a separate Sikh country within the Punjab region of South Asia.
  8. Based on the global spread of Sikhs, we’re only really looking at 30% of the Sikh population who live outside of India. The majority 70% of potential cinema sales is lost income for the filmmakers if Sadda Haq ban is not lifted. The financial hit will discourage other filmakers just as the Indian elite want. Our job should now be to lift the ban in India. Now is the time to use our contacts with the Sants, Jatehdars, Jathebhandis etc to add to the pressure on SGPC to revoke their opinion against the movie.
  9. http://www.thesikh100.com/ Someones done "top 100" list of Sikhs. Accordingly this is supposed to be the most powerful and influential Sikhs in the world today... Maybe I'm looking too hard for the Sikhs I believe have been the most influential in the last year or so I can't find the high profile parcharaks such as Giani Pinderpal Singh, Baba Ranjit Singh Dhadrianwala, Baba Baljit Singh Dadusahib, Dr Sukhpreet Singh Udoke, Giani Thakur Singh on the list. The well known kirtaniya such as Bhai Niranjan Singh, Rangila etc are missing. Bhai Balwant Singh Rajoana is missing...Baba Fauja Singh the runner is missing...Bhai Balbir Singh Bains of SOPW is missing...Gurmail S Kandola Sikh Council UK is missing....even the contemporary likes of Davinder Bal of Sikh Channel, the Singh Twins, Kanwar Singh Dhillon (Art of Punjab), the Singh who started Vismaad are missing...
  10. Any feedback? Can't find much in the press except for an article in Hindustan Times dated 12 March. http://www.hindustantimes.com/world-news/Europe/Sikh-debates-in-UK-Parliament/Article1-1025400.aspx
  11. In Ilford we have an increase in Eastern European men attending the Gurdwara to eat Langar. This is where we have a bit of a communication breakdown as many of the Latvian, Luthianian and Polish men's English is not strong and many of the daytime elders, bibya and faujies English is also not strong which has lead to some heated situations. Perhaps we need some signs up in the Eastern European languages. Our main issue in Ilford Gurdwaras during the day is the small volume of drunken or stoned men coming in for langar. Although, the numbers are very small, it's often intimidating for the elders and women who are present in the Gurdwara during the day. The evening's and weekends are not an issue as there is more sangat to take care of the situation. There needs to be some form of light security in the Gurdwaras during the weekdays if nothing but just to diffuse any issues and handle the anti-social behaviour. Ultimately, when someone's out of their head, they will ignore all signs. Again this is where the security would be more beneficial. The Gurdwara is a public building and should always be open for all, however the safety of the sangat is also of importance so striking the balance is what is needed.
  12. It is nearly lunchtime at the gurdwara and a group of women are busy preparing food in the large kitchen. The smell of onions and Indian spices fills the large room. The kitchen is open from 05:00 each morning and will feed langar - the free meal available to all worshippers - to nearly 300 people throughout the day. Peter Lowe is a non-Sikh and is one of the people here this lunchtime, sitting on the carpeted floor of the langar hall with the worshippers. Mr Lowe, 28, starting coming to the gurdwara when he was homeless a few years ago. ''I didn't have a job and I couldn't access any benefits, and I was struggling to feed myself'', he recalls while eating the langar. "Someone told me about the gurdwara and how I could come here to eat a hot meal. "When I first came, I didn't know what to expect. But everyone was very friendly and welcoming - they showed me around and never asked me for anything. "I would come to the gurdwara a couple of times a week" The homeless and hungry people coming to our gurdwaras is a growing trend we have seen in the last couples of years Sukhvinder Padda Sikh Council UK "It gave me a lot of support knowing that there was somewhere I could go to when it was cold and wet outside and I had nowhere else to go. ''The gurdwara was like my sanctuary.'' Mr Lowe is now back on his feet and is studying at the University of Leicester. The Guru Nanak gurdwara in Leicester is just one of the places of worship which has seen a sharp rise in the number of people turning up for food and shelter. Anyone can enter a gurdwara, irrespective of religion, sex or background and all visitors are welcome to have langar. There are about 300 gurdwaras across the UK and the Sikh Council UK says thousands of Sikhs and non-Sikhs are turning up each week for meals and shelter. ''The homeless and hungry people coming to our gurdwaras is a growing trend we have seen in the last couples of years,'' said Sukhvinder Padda, the assistant secretary general of the Sikh Council UK. ''The economic situation has affected many families and gurdwaras are experiencing the outcome of that. ''More people are turning to our places of worship because there is growing awareness about gurdwaras and the fact that they are open to everyone,'' said Mr Padda. Continue reading the main story What is langar? Every gurdwara has a langar where all people are welcome to a free meal regardless of their sex, colour or religion. There are no rituals observed in the langar and everyone eats together. All the food is vegetarian so that no religious group is offended. Guru Nanak Dev Ji established the langar because he rejected the Hindu caste system where people of different castes do not eat together. Guru Nanak Dev Ji wanted to stress the idea that everyone is equal. Everyone shares the tasks of preparation, cooking, serving and cleaning. This shows sewa - selfless service to the others in the sadhsangat (community), the gurdwara, and the world outside. The teaching of the langar was continued by Guru Amar Das Ji (the third Guru) who made a rule that no one, however important, could see him until they had first eaten in the langar. Source: BBC Religion Discover more about Sikhism Many gurdwaras are having to cope with problems of anti-social behaviour on their premises. ''This is a place of worship and on the board outside we have a clear sign saying, 'Please do not bring alcohol, cigarettes or drugs into the gurdwara','' said Sulakhan Singh Dard, the vice president of the Guru Nanak gurdwara. ''But we are having problems every single week with anti-social people who are drunk or taking drugs coming into our gurdwara. "I have had to clean vomit in the toilets and pick up cigarette butts left in the langar hall. ''Some people become threatening or violent when we turn them away and we are regularly having to call the police. "On one occasion someone we turned away told us he would come back with a double-barrel shotgun and shoot us all down," he said. While most gurdwaras are happy to welcome homeless people or anyone that is hungry on to their premises they will not tolerate individuals who do not abide by the rules of the temple. ''It is not acceptable to have to deal with anti-social behaviour in our premises," said Mr Padda. ''The government, the social services and local authority should be doing more to help these people. It has become a real burden and stress for our gurdwara."
  13. Sentenced to 150 hours community service and £1,100 fine to pay for alleged damages to Indian Workers Association party If anyone wants to contact Bhai Sahib directly, please PM me and I will pass you his number. Once again Bhai Sahib's family shouldn't be left to pick up the pieces up....
×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

Terms of Use