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  1. Today
  2. Another one to add to the list of things white people do:
  3. Why are you awaiting a consensus or permission to proceed? Your profile as a published author would surely open doors to places and people that would remain firmly shut to the rabble on this forum. Use your contacts in the press and publishing industry to get the ball rolling. Good luck.
  4. Yesterday
  5. I do feel I need it - given the rampant misinformation out there. What you just pointed at might seem like a legitimate source to you, but that is comical to me. So you have no contemporary or near contemporary source outside of this very recent online 'article'. Now we may well find a contemporary or near contemporary source if we hunted, but the fact that you point at what you did, like it had some unquestionable veracity says a lot (and what it says ain't good). If it is true, it would (sadly) conform to what I've experienced with our people anyway, especially the 'rural' lot. I'd just like people to be more conscious and critical of their sources.
  6. I've heard the opposite. Actually I distinctly remember a news report shortly after the American invasion of of the region (post 9/11), that specifically mentioned Sikh females removing their burkhas in the Sikh colonies over there. This (presumably) didn't last long, given the west's failure over there. So you think the Taliban had all Muslim women bowling around in burkhas (which ironically Sikh merchants largely supplied) and allowed Sikh women to bowl around without them...... Seriously.
  7. "The answer to your first question is the fact that Punjab was always, for thousands of years, an integral province of Persia and entirely seperate from anything we would know today as 'India' Punjab was Persia's easternmost state and its most celebrated and richest." this is a complete lie.
  8. jkvlondon

    Are Arabs turning their backs on religion?

    Making them seem morelike the rest of the people as we all know what hyperadherents are like for a country's stability
  9. Big_Tera

    Are Arabs turning their backs on religion?

    The only reason they are least affected is because they force religion down peoples throats. Ie in Islamic ruled countries. Everything they do is governed by their faith. They have to follow sharia law which makes them follow their faith to the dot. But that is the problem that has back fired on them. When you force religion on people they can go the other way and rebel against it. Ive noticed from personal experience with working with turkish, iranian and many middle eastern muslims is that although they are somewhat religious, They dont try and force it down peoples throats and are alot more liberal then brown porkistanis who seem to be the most extreeme muslims. By an large you never here issues of middle eastern muslims struggling to integrate in the uk it is always the porkistanis. Many middle eastern muslims eat non halal food even pork drink alcohol, dont go to mosque and are far from religious.
  10. dallysingh101

    Nishan Sahib, when did we start using the Khanda

    I agree.
  11. Redoptics

    Nishan Sahib, when did we start using the Khanda

    You might be spot on but like I said I am not sure on this one, maybe some research is needed?
  12. dallysingh101

    Nishan Sahib, when did we start using the Khanda

    See I disagree there. When we start looking at the writings of Guru ji as in the Dasam Granth and Zafarnama, we see symbolism and subtle allusion used heavily therein. I mean one of the most blatant examples is the use of the Chandi narrative. Look at the whole Khalsa culture - it is ram packed with symbolism too (as well as heavily practical aspects!) It seems out of character for Guru ji not to give deep thought to these things from what I can gather????
  13. Redoptics

    Nishan Sahib, when did we start using the Khanda

    To be honest they are real weapons used by Guru Hargobind Ji and Sikhs going forward, I do not think there was any symbolic meaning to it, but obviously I could be wrong. Symbolism is usually repeating motifs such as eye of horus, dawn of a new day, a cross etc etc etc.
  14. dallysingh101

    Nishan Sahib, when did we start using the Khanda

    K. My point is that: is the symbology that is employed on the original Khalsa standard significant? Did Guru ji chose what was on there carefully with implied symbolic meaning - or was it just a simple selection of weaponry of the time? Essentially, does the standard have deeper implied meanings? - to put it concisely and bluntly.
  15. MisterrSingh

    Are Arabs turning their backs on religion?

    Interesting. I wonder what the actual reason is for the BBC to publicise these findings. Disarming perceptions? Galvanising Islamic resolve? Curious.
  16. Redoptics

    Nishan Sahib, when did we start using the Khanda

    No straight up
  17. Jonny101

    Are Arabs turning their backs on religion?

    All religions are facing non religiosity. Muslims are least affected compared to others. But it is increasing in their ranks as well now.
  18. dallysingh101

    Are Arabs turning their backs on religion?

    That's already made the finding dubious in my opinion. Probably wishful thinking on the BBC's part.
  19. dallysingh101

    Nishan Sahib, when did we start using the Khanda

    You being sarcastic? lol
  20. dallysingh101

    Who Cares ?

    That's so sad, but let's understand this fully, on a wider global perspective. If powerful Sikhs back in Punjab (and here I mean mainly the SGPC aligned brigade - those in positions of power and who have access to massive resources) gave any sort of serious hoot about developing the state and it's economy (outside of some medieval feudal vision that only benefits a minority) and instead of playing clannish, casteist, selfish politics which panders to certain people's ego, that place wouldn't generally be such a shyte hole that people would risk everything to escape it. It's backwardness on our own people's part in our homeland that is behind this. I've heard from faujis themselves that people routinely die on the 'donkey' trail to get here. So the indirect death toll from failures of apnay in power back home is much higher than we imagine. Then (and I'm talking from personal experience here), we have a complex issue of those that have managed to reach here but at some point find themselves in over their heads and resorting to hardcore drinking and drug abuse to try and cope with it all. Some just give up altogether. I've seen such apnay around the way, drinking in full public, in busy shopping centres in the middle of the day, dishevelled and detached. Now, this obviously stems from deeply embedded psychological issues, that can't be resolved overnight. You can't just solve those deeply rooted neurological issues just by treating the symptoms (although I'm not saying that that shouldn't be done). I know around the Ilford area we had a few such apnay die in the last few years in the cold weather too. I think these things stem from a culture where posing and status is the bottom line, and acknowledging personal difficulties (and let's be straight here - human weakness) is a taboo - and only really results in ignorant apnay laughing at people in trouble. This deeply embedded VERY COMMON cultural attitude amongst apnay (which stems from Punjab whether we like it or not) totally decimates any chance of creating a reasonable, society, which serves as a support network for such people. So if we've got this dog eat dog scenario going on, it's only natural that some people will fall through the cracks and generally it's every man for himself. And when people do try and help - most of the time it seems like some photo-op to enhance status. Those people back home who routinely sell their votes for caste pride, or a bottle of whiskey or whatnot have a big hand in this. Forget running away abroad, us diasporans should be able to go back home and prosper too, bring some of our resources and skills over there for this - but we all know that corruption is so normalised over there - that this is as likely as spotting a unicorn.
  21. Jonny101

    Guru Arjan Dev ji di shaheedi - true culprits

    Now days this video is very important. I've noticed many people out of Islamo-Philia in the last few years down playing the atrocities of Muslim rulers in the past and inflating the role of Hindus. This can be seen by many misguided Khalistanis. Besides very few know about the Sirhindi, Jahangir role in Guru jees Shaheedi unless you have read books by Dr Ganda Singh and Sirdar Kapoor Singh. You talk to any Sikh or even Kathavachak about Sirhindi they would have no idea who this person is. Nothing wrong with being friendly with Muslims. But one should not try to change history out of one's political inclinations.
  22. Arabs are increasingly saying they are no longer religious, according to the largest and most in-depth survey undertaken of the Middle East and North Africa. The finding is one of a number on how Arabs feel about a wide range of issues, from women's rights and migration to security and sexuality. More than 25,000 people were interviewed for the survey - for BBC News Arabic by the Arab Barometer research network - across 10 countries and the Palestinian territories between late 2018 and spring 2019. Here are some of the results. Since 2013, the number of people across the region identifying as "not religious" has risen from 8% to 13%. The rise is greatest in the under 30s, among whom 18% identify as not religious, according to the research. Only Yemen saw a fall in the category. https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-middle-east-48703377
  23. Redoptics

    Nishan Sahib, when did we start using the Khanda

    Hold it in your fist, to punch with.
  24. Redoptics

    Nishan Sahib, when did we start using the Khanda

    The small knife is a katar
  25. dallysingh101

    Nishan Sahib, when did we start using the Khanda

    Lol I'm sure you guys have figured it out, but just in case anyone hasn't, those bolts on the shield are meant to be these things:
  26. Redoptics

    Nishan Sahib, when did we start using the Khanda

    Yeah that shield looks like button moon lol oldies will know what I mean lol
  27. I think the talk outlines what we are meant to be as singhs in the khalsa panth.
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