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Found 69 results

  1. Guest

    How to fix parna

    I am 14 and i've started tying my parna, but i can't stop my joorah from sticking out. I've tried arranging my hair in different ways but those ways often fall apart or just don't work (like this https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9R2waCxBZd8) my hair is too short for the final knot, it goes down to my waist and i'm 5'5. What can i do to stop my joorah from sticking out of my parna
  2. For those who tie the kenyan style turban, do you always iron your pagh after folding it, or do you just tie it after ironing ? I have never really ever ironed it, I just tie it after folding it. Have you ever done both ? Does it make a difference ? Also I wonder, how long do you tie that pagh until you change it ?
  3. I was wondering does anyone know how to tie a comfortable round turban that is like a dhumalla, but not really a dhumalla. I tie the folded uk pagh but looks more like sgpc pagh because it has more larhs ( 6 to 7) . I kind of want to stay away from the pagh, everyone thinks I look too desi, and its big in size I am not amritdhari, but wish to one day. I don't want to wear a nokh pagh because i really hate it ( physically because its uncomfortable, and also i don't resonate with the design). I have also lost of hair due to health reasons. I looked online for dhumallas, but they all have bungas. I don't have much hair to tie a bunga ( and i tried once, but i was kind of pulling my hair and it hurt) . I don't want to tie a parna because its very loose ( and looks sloppy). I don't want the turban going up, but going behind my head ( if that makes sense ?). I want something to cover my hair, but also don't want to seem some religious person. Just want something comfortable and not noticing. Anyone ? Thanks
  4. "it is impossible to wear any garment without transmitting social signals. Every costume tells a story, often a very subtle one, about its wearer" - Desmond Morris Yesterday, I posted a new thread here on this forum. Don't go looking for it because you won't find it. The MODS haven't allowed you to read it. Either they think you're not intelligent enough to understand it and where I was going with it or they themselves were not. Nobody can say for sure. Although my money's on the Mods.The object of that thread that never came to fruit was to challenge our perceptions and how race and class plays a big part in the process. It was actually a very funny piece - it was making me laugh even as i was writing it - and it was about the news yesterday about 2 groups of Surgeons and Consultants at a London hospital continuously fighting with each other, putting patients at risk. In yesterday's piece I tried to demonstrate in a humorous way the distinction between how these 2 'gangs' were perceived by the public and how working class 'gangs', often black or brown, in the same area were perceived. (note: the working class 'gangs' in question had been responsible for a couple of deaths whereas investigators say the 2 surgeon gangs could have the blood of over a hundred people on their hands). Perception and psychology then....its everywhere. Having just finished the summer music festival season we see that, each year, the 'white' festivals are full to the brim with drugs with young people regularly dying of overdoses and yet it is the black man's carnival that must be banned because of drugs (weed) and loud music. We hear no mention of the racist music of the far-right and yet the Met police actively announce a crackdown and ban on black music (drill). Perception...its everywhere, not least in the garments we wear. In the 1950's we had the Zoot suit riots in America after American police regularly brutalised and arrested all brown youths wearing zoot suits for no reason other than the fact that they were brown whilst wearing a zoot suit. The perception was that to be brown and in a smart zoot suit you just had to be up to no good. In my own family, nobody had kept their kes and wore a pagh for at least 3 generations until I did. And when i did, perceptions about me changed and the psychology behind those perceptions depended almost entirely upon the race / creed of the perceptor. White people started seeing me as ultra-religious and pious...and even a well of knowledge. Most Punjabis however detest the image and saw it as a sign of uneducated backwardness. Those contrasts are just so extreme. The fact that this turban on my head sets of an instant judgement reaction in people's minds - both super negative and super positive - depending on the racial background of the person that sees me. It's natural...and it's all good. I do it too...when I see a white man in a turban. He might be a train driver or labourer but my misguided perception is nearly always that he could teach me a thing or two about healthy living and yoga. And thats the thing about wearing the turban. There are so many instant perceptions about you that you sometimes almost feel that you should live up to them. You start thinking to yourself "well if all those white people think I must be a fountain of wisdom maybe i should live up to that positive perception". Their psychology starts to affect your psychology. Inexplicably, you start to alter your psyche just so that you can live up to the race based stereotype notions formed in the minds of people who didn't even know their perceptions were based on racial ignorance. Of course its absurd. But life is absurd. This turban on my head has closed a few pointless doors but it's opened a hellava lot more doors....doors that actually lead to somewhere. And thats just one of the stories that this 'garment' of head has to tell. tell me yours......
  5. On eBay my good friend sikhonlinestore from UK is selling 5-ring chakar. As we know many kara are sold in 2,5,7,9,etc rings but I was wondering if anyone saw chakar in 9 rings for sale anywhere. I am very curious if such things exist.
  6. Waheguru Ji Ka Khalsa, Waheguru Ji Ki Fateh! Does anyone know how to tie a Puratan style Dastar, the same type of style that Guru Gobind Singh Ji or Guru Hargobind Ji wore?
  7. Just come across it, so not watched it yet https://www.bbc.co.uk/iplayer/episode/b09zcvct/my-turban-and-me : Documentary exploring Sikh identity in modern Britain. Actor and comedian Sanjeev Kohli goes on a heartwarming personal journey to explore the importance of wearing the Sikh turban in Britain and investigate why it is becoming more popular. Sanjeev, most famous for his role as Navid in the BBC1 comedy Still Game, comes from a proud Sikh heritage, but is the only male member of his family not to wear the turban and sees this journey as a reconnection with the Sikh community. He starts off by looking into his own family history, how his turban-wearing brothers were bullied at school, and questions whether he was right to make the decision at the age of 14 not to wear one. As a father of teenagers, Sanjeev tries find out whether attitudes towards the turban have changed over generations by meeting passionate young Sikhs in all walks of life. Over the course of his journey he discovers that, while many first-generation Punjabi immigrants wanted to try to fit in, their children and grandchildren are trying to stand out, and there is a resurgence of British Sikhs - both men and women - wearing the turban and reclaiming their identity. He also attempts to find out what lies behind this new-found enthusiasm to publicly embrace their religious identity
  8. As a non- Sikh Caucasian I am extremely curious (and cautious) as to what you guys think about the fact of non-Sikh (regardless of race) wearing turban type headwraps. I've always adored the headwraps/ turbans that I have seen people wearing around the city, and had always wondered what it would be like to wear them.
  9. Hello, I would like to get SikhSangat's observations on the number of dastar-wearing Sikh women compared to the number of dastar-wearing (non-trimming, sabat surat) Sikh men under the age of 40 (I am most interested in the younger generation). It will be very interesting to see what Sikhs who live in the different part of the world have observed. Please state where you live, and whether your observation pertains to your locality, or if you believe it to be global (or over a wider geographic range than the area where you live). Please state your answer in the following format: "My observation is that for every non-trimming young Sikh man who wears a dastar, there are three young Sikh women who wear dastars" or "My observation is that for every young Sikh woman who wears a dastar, there are four non-trimming young Sikh men who wear dastars" You get the idea
  10. Guest

    Dumalla and Ears

    WJKK WJKF My dumalla has been causing me issues ever since i started wearing it. My dumalla consists of a bunga (does not cover my ear), then the Keski (does not cover my ear), then the actual dumalla (final piece, does cover my ears) Throughout the day of wearing it would start to sting my ears. I then lift up the part that is covering my ears and then people would say it is very red and has a cut. I would prefer to keep my turban on my ears since it becomes more stable. WJKK WJKF
  11. The Muslims and Hindus have largely abandoned wearing the turban in India. It has become a Sikh icon, so all Sikhs should proudly wear it.
  12. WGJKK WGJKF Hello, I am coming here for honest opinions. I feel the members of my gurdwara would feel uncomfortable speaking openly about this subject, and I don't wish to make them uncomfortable as I haven't been studying long. I am a 25 year old white American who is very interested in Sikhi. I have only recently begun my path of discovery, and would want to spend an absolute minimum of one year (probably longer) meditating, reading gurbani, doing seva, and properly understanding Sikh philosophy before concerning myself with the five K's. However, I do feel I will eventually get to the point of sufficient devotion to feel comfortable identifying myself as Sikh, and would begin to explore wearing the turban. I will reevaluate at that time, and discuss the issue earnestly with members of the gurdwara, but I would like to hear anonymous opinions about this now. I just can't help but feel it might be seen as silly, rude, or offensive for a white person to wear a turban. I know at the end of the day, my relationship with the guru is what is most important, but the communities opinion is something to consider. I also want to simply be prepared for the reactions I might receive. How do you view a white person wearing a turban (regardless of how sihki says you should feel)? How do you think the Indian community at large views this matter? Finally, what are your opinions on keeping kesh, but not wearing a turban? I feel this may be an appropriate intermediate point, but I don't wish to offend. I know the head should be covered, but anything other than the turban looks too sloppy for an adult at work to wear. Kesh tied in a joora also looks sloppy, yes, but I feel a sloppy head covering conveys a worse image than uncovered kesh. This is only my opinion, however, and I admit I could easily be wrong. Thank you for your time and opinions. Feel free to speak openly, any negative feelings are completely understandable to me.
  13. Question is, how do/ would you feel if and when others pat down your turbans at airport for security? Would you... 1. Insist on them using swab/ wand 2. Let them touch but feel humiliated (request number 1 failed) 3. Let them pat down but think nothing of it?
  14. Thought I would share some information with fellow dastar wearing brothers and sisters as a word of caution. Over the weekend I visited Drayton Manor theme park (near Birmingham, UK) for the first time. I've been on all rollercoasters and rides wearing my pugg and have never had any issues both here in the UK and Florida. However when I went on Shockwave the stand up rollercoaster at Drayton Manor after the first loop there was a rapid acceleration and the wind factor literally blew my pugg right off. I literally couldn't believe it. It was not as if my turban was not tied tightly or loose in anyway, as I had just come off their G-Force rollercoaster fine. I have to give credit and respect to the staff there as they stopped the ride and one of the senior staff offered to go and see if they could find it, although he was not hopeful he would find it or it would be in a wearable state as he said there was water underneath that portion of the ride . I was so relieved that he managed to find it and returned to me. Afterwards he told me that I'm not the first one who has lost their turban on this ride especially after the first loop. Be warned and take precaution if your going to ride this one. I would be interested to know if any others have had a similar issue on this ride.
  15. http://m.huffpost.com/us/entry/us_58dd52e4e4b0e6ac70935777 what is your views on this? Personally I'm split on the issue.
  16. Guest

    Dastar / keski

    Vaheguru ji ka khalsa Vaheguru ji ki fateh ji I'm kesdhari, male. I wear a dastar. I was wondering, can men wear a keski in place of a dastar too? Like many women do. Sometimes I wear a keski around the house or if I'm having a lazy day and aren't going out or expecting company. Just wondered where we stand on this...
  17. Vaheguru Ji Ka Khalsa, Vaheguru Ji Ki Fateh I am a Sikh girl who has recently started wearing a Dastaar. I chose to do this as I wish to live in the bana that the Guru set for us. I am also Amritdhari. One question came to my mind... Is wearing a Dupatta/Chunni required if I am wearing a Dastaar. From my belief, Dupattas/Chunnis are meant to cover hair as a sign of respect for the Guru. Wearing a Dastaar permanently takes care of that. However, I see several women that have Keskis, yet they use a Dupatta/Chunni to wrap it around their breasts/bust. Is that the whole point of a Dupatta? To simply cover one's breasts? Women without keski/dastaar are often just covering their chest with a Dupatta/Chunni yet have their heads uncovered. Defeats the whole purpose... So simply put, is it preferred for women in Gurdwaras to cover their breasts over their hair? And if I am wearing a Keski, then is it preferred if I also wear a Dupatta/Chunni to cover my breasts? I would be grateful if someone could shine some light on this issue for me. Thank you. Kind Regards
  18. Waheguru ji ka Khalsa Waheguru ji ki Fateh Hello everyone I am a Sikh girl living in Europe and i wanna tie Dastaar, but i don't know how to tell my parents about this, because nobody in my family is wearing turban and I don't know if they are cool with it. Almost a year ago I started learning Gurmukhi and about Sikhi in generall and now I'm learning Path and Kirtan. Now I'm not ready for taking Amrit, it's a big descision and responsibility. Sikhi is a way of life so I wanna go it step by step.
  19. https://petition.parliament.uk/petitions/125788
  20. Vaheguru Ji Ka Khalsa Vaheguru Ji Ki Fateh! The article talks about how some Singh used his Dastar to save something. http://www.independent.co.uk/news/world/asia/sikh-man-uses-turban-to-save-dog-from-drowning-india-canal-a7067391.html Vaheguru Ji Ka Khalsa Vaheguru Ji Ki Fateh!
  21. http://twitchy.com/2016/01/24/cair-msm-falsely-accuse-donald-trump-of-mocking-protester-in-a-turban-video/
  22. VJKK VJKF... We did some price comparisons today for Dastars and we thought we would share what we found to save you the time when your looking in the future! Hope it helps.
  23. ***Please like/share to create awareness *** In the November 1984 Sikh Genocide, Sikh males were targeted because of their Turbans. In this picture you can see a Sikh male who has been beaten with rods and is held down, his hair forcibly cut and beard shaved off..... he is then clubbed to death. They took his identity before they killed him. Waheguru. ... This was the same across India during the first few days of November 1984. In remembrance of ALL those Turban wearing Sikhs that were killed , we urge EVERYONE that has never wore a turban before, to wear one during this ‪#‎RemembranceWeek‬ 1st- 7th Nov, in solidarity with our brothers... PLEASE wear a turban and upload the image to social media with the hash tag ‪#‎SikhTurban84‬.... Lets ALL unite in solidarity in remembering OUR Shaheeds. https://m.facebook.com/426401160878711/photos/a.436404843211676.1073741829.426401160878711/445666422285518/?type=3
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