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GOI censors ANOTHER film: Papilo Buddha


VanHelsingh
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Warning: Brief glimpse of a female being stripped of her clothes

Last second of the movie, showing Buddha statue being burnt - recalled the memories of history when I read "Buddha Bodh Gaya Tree in Bihar" - TREE under which Mahatma Gautam Buddha got reincarnation was then burnt at that time by followers by Adi SankarayaCharya / Mihirkula, to start the Vedic/Brahamanism again, as Mahatma Gautam Buddha was against caste system - untouchability.

It is a shame Sikhs have not been able to do effective "PRACHAR" of Guru Nanak message, and take Sikhism to all castes / races ... We have pretty much kept our message within ourselves, hence so many sects Radha-Swamis/NarakDhari's etc. all giving 1 page of Naam/Shabad from Guru Granth Sahib Jee, and masses joining them as they do PRACHAR, and they do PRACHAR to ALL. We restrict it just to ourselves.

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Wow, amazing. It looks like a great film and looks really well made.

We need films of this caliber in the future. I hope it gets unbanned.

Exactly. That's what I was alluding to a few weeks ago when talking about Sadda Haq, which is a great achievement in itself, but if we really want to attract the attention of film festivals, etc., then the level of sophistication needs to be ramped up when it comes to our productions. You don't need a huge budget to make something real and full of integrity. Panjabi pot-boilers are a great start (it shows us thinking outside the box and making use of modern media) but I hope there's a gradual progression into these kind of hard-hitting films.

Although another part of me wonders whether we'd get any of the audience who flocked to watch Sadda Haq to see a similarly crafted (like Papilo Buddha) Sikh-oriented movie, without a Jazzy-B number to get the feet tapping, lol? :giggle:

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Exactly. That's what I was alluding to a few weeks ago when talking about Sadda Haq, which is a great achievement in itself, but if we really want to attract the attention of film festivals, etc., then the level of sophistication needs to be ramped up when it comes to our productions. You don't need a huge budget to make something real and full of integrity. Panjabi pot-boilers are a great start (it shows us thinking outside the box and making use of modern media) but I hope there's a gradual progression into these kind of hard-hitting films.

Although another part of me wonders whether we'd get any of the audience who flocked to watch Sadda Haq to see a similarly crafted (like Papilo Buddha) Sikh-oriented movie, without a Jazzy-B number to get the feet tapping, lol? :giggle:

Totally agreed, I said the same thing even though Sadda Haq was great for a truthful punjabi movie, but it wasn't something you'd see get a film festival showing.

It's been a dream of mine for quite some time to take up making movies related to Sikh history and documentaries, but I'm not studying film or anything close and don't currently have the means. I think it would be an honorable profession to pursue, but many punjabi parents would be against it due to the financial risk and security uncertainty involved. As a community we don't tend to get out there and become our own 'individual' by finding our own passion despite the risks. Maybe one more generation?

I do think if a high quality historical film were made we would be able to rally behind it and support it and even bring it to the maknstre, something you can't do with punjabi movies.

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Totally agreed, I said the same thing even though Sadda Haq was great for a truthful punjabi movie, but it wasn't something you'd see get a film festival showing.

It's been a dream of mine for quite some time to take up making movies related to Sikh history and documentaries, but I'm not studying film or anything close and don't currently have the means. I think it would be an honorable profession to pursue, but many punjabi parents would be against it due to the financial risk and security uncertainty involved. As a community we don't tend to get out there and become our own 'individual' by finding our own passion despite the risks. Maybe one more generation?

I do think if a high quality historical film were made we would be able to rally behind it and support it and even bring it to the maknstre, something you can't do with punjabi movies.

Love, respect, and take care of your parents. But nobody in the history of civilization ever made a change or became a trail-blazer by worrying about what their parents would think when embarking on a new, dangerous path. Wider society is full of hypocrites so no need to worry about them.

I find that, ultimately, Panjabi parents resist their offspring pursuing unconventional paths, whether it be in film-making, art, i.e. pursuits outside of the standard law, medical, and engineering professions. However it doesn't surprise me when said parents change their tune when a degree of success is gained in those previously unconventional fields, So really all parents crave is success for their children; they just happen to prefer the kind of success which is virutally guaranteed as opposed to the kind which is rather risky to begin with.

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