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Toxic ingredients in your Indian spices and what to do


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The powdered spices you buy from the shops are known to be adulterated with toxic, disease causing chemicals. Why take the risk?

These are just some common examples:

1. Haldi/Turmeric powder - can contain carcinogenic, organotoxic melanil yellow (azo dye) and lead chromate (paint). 

2, Red chilli powder- lead oxide - carcinogenic

3. Cinnamon is adulterated with cassia bark - carcinogenic, hepatotoxic, neurotoxic. Buy whole ceylon cinnamon instead. 

Solution:

It is safer to buy the spices whole and powder them at home. Store bought powders are easily adulterated and cannot be detected with the senses. 

Also during the processing of the powders, the nutrients and medicinal qualities can be destroyed .e.g with high temperatures.

I have recently powdered whole haldi and noticed immediately a difference in colour, smell, taste. 

At the end of the day, do not take a chance with your health. Is it really worth risking over convenience? 

http://epicureandigest.com/2014/03/12/seven-adulterated-spices-most-likely-in-your-kitchen-now/

https://www.researchgate.net/profile/Vinita_Katiyar/publication/286453417_Food_Adulteration_The_Demonic_Onslaught_on_Health_and_Wellness/links/566a995108ae1a797e37c896/Food-Adulteration-The-Demonic-Onslaught-on-Health-and-Wellness.pdf

 

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23 minutes ago, superdupersingh said:

The powdered spices you buy from the shops are known to be adulterated with toxic, disease causing chemicals. Why take the risk?

These are just some common examples:

1. Haldi/Turmeric powder - can contain carcinogenic, organotoxic melanil yellow (azo dye) and lead chromate (paint). 

2, Red chilli powder- lead oxide - carcinogenic

3. Cinnamon is adulterated with cassia bark - carcinogenic, hepatotoxic, neurotoxic. Buy whole ceylon cinnamon instead. 

Solution:

It is safer to buy the spices whole and powder them at home. Store bought powders are easily adulterated and cannot be detected with the senses. 

Also during the processing of the powders, the nutrients and medicinal qualities can be destroyed .e.g with high temperatures.

I have recently powdered whole haldi and noticed immediately a difference in colour, smell, taste. 

At the end of the day, do not take a chance with your health. Is it really worth risking over convenience? 

http://epicureandigest.com/2014/03/12/seven-adulterated-spices-most-likely-in-your-kitchen-now/

https://www.researchgate.net/profile/Vinita_Katiyar/publication/286453417_Food_Adulteration_The_Demonic_Onslaught_on_Health_and_Wellness/links/566a995108ae1a797e37c896/Food-Adulteration-The-Demonic-Onslaught-on-Health-and-Wellness.pdf

 

I've always made my own garam masala from scratch and buy organic spices it's just whole level better taste wise ...if I can use fresh I will in preference to dried

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5 minutes ago, jkvlondon said:

I've always made my own garam masala from scratch and buy organic spices it's just whole level better taste wise ...if I can use fresh I will in preference to dried

That's great. Can you please share the  ingredients and quantities you use to make garam masala? Thanks

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2 minutes ago, superdupersingh said:

That's great. Can you please share the  ingredients and quantities you use to make garam masala? Thanks

no problem most garam masala mixes on shop shelves have junk like nutmeg (poisonous if more than 1/4 teaspoon ingested ), star anise (very strident aniseed taste will ruin everything we eat)

weight wise equal quantities of jeera and dhaniya seed  is the backbone/main bulk I usually do a masala day where I grind about three -four kilos of garam masala spices ... my recommendation for blender is Vitamix  I use this with its dry milling jug perfect for this job

1.5kg jeera

1.5kg dhaniya

250g black peppercorns

250g whole cinnamon ( break down in ghotni)

100g cloves

125g Kali elacchi ( break open pods in ghotni)

after sorting  through removing debris, stalks, stones  place mixed  spices on baking trays  and put in oven for 1/2 hour at  100 degrees to totally dry them

let them cool gradually

grind in small batches and strain into container , putting the remainder back into grinder

don't overheat your grinder , take breaks if necessary

tip if the garam masala smells too sweet you can add more black pepper and dhaniya /jeera to bring it into balance/taste profile you like. (you won't need to sniff it the smell will be in the air.

 

 

 

 

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1 hour ago, jkvlondon said:

no problem most garam masala mixes on shop shelves have junk like nutmeg (poisonous if more than 1/4 teaspoon ingested ), star anise (very strident aniseed taste will ruin everything we eat)

weight wise equal quantities of jeera and dhaniya seed  is the backbone/main bulk I usually do a masala day where I grind about three -four kilos of garam masala spices ... my recommendation for blender is Vitamix  I use this with its dry milling jug perfect for this job

1.5kg jeera

1.5kg dhaniya

250g black peppercorns

250g whole cinnamon ( break down in ghotni)

100g cloves

125g Kali elacchi ( break open pods in ghotni)

after sorting  through removing debris, stalks, stones  place mixed  spices on baking trays  and put in oven for 1/2 hour at  100 degrees to totally dry them

let them cool gradually

grind in small batches and strain into container , putting the remainder back into grinder

don't overheat your grinder , take breaks if necessary

tip if the garam masala smells too sweet you can add more black pepper and dhaniya /jeera to bring it into balance/taste profile you like. (you won't need to sniff it the smell will be in the air.

 

 

 

 

Cool. Will try this. Is it necessary to heat it in the oven?

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3 minutes ago, superdupersingh said:

Cool. Will try this. Is it necessary to heat it in the oven?

yep to make sure that the masala lasts well and doesn't go mouldy ... I keep mine in two massive OXO Good Grips Pop containers 5.2l  and give away the rest to my friend and Mum

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5 hours ago, jkvlondon said:

no problem most garam masala mixes on shop shelves have junk like nutmeg (poisonous if more than 1/4 teaspoon ingested ), star anise (very strident aniseed taste will ruin everything we eat)

weight wise equal quantities of jeera and dhaniya seed  is the backbone/main bulk I usually do a masala day where I grind about three -four kilos of garam masala spices ... my recommendation for blender is Vitamix  I use this with its dry milling jug perfect for this job

1.5kg jeera

1.5kg dhaniya

250g black peppercorns

250g whole cinnamon ( break down in ghotni)

100g cloves

125g Kali elacchi ( break open pods in ghotni)

after sorting  through removing debris, stalks, stones  place mixed  spices on baking trays  and put in oven for 1/2 hour at  100 degrees to totally dry them

let them cool gradually

grind in small batches and strain into container , putting the remainder back into grinder

don't overheat your grinder , take breaks if necessary

tip if the garam masala smells too sweet you can add more black pepper and dhaniya /jeera to bring it into balance/taste profile you like. (you won't need to sniff it the smell will be in the air.

 

 

 

 

I like this. Thanks penji, going to try it one day. We never use the packet stuff now, it’s rubbish. And you can taste the difference. 

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