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Premi5

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Everything posted by Premi5

  1. The Vitamin D thing is being overplayed possibly. It was not a big topic 10-15 years ago
  2. Surprised he admitted that. Would the CEO have just had it done anyway fear and hysteria probably suppress immune system so it would be no surprise of more people are getting infectious illness
  3. A little off topic, but can you recommend any good books on psychology because you seem to have learned a lot
  4. Thanks for posting - was trying but unable in my above post It's a very strange story and the media are really pushing the vaccine onto to us
  5. Media desperate for people to have it: https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-55227325 Covid-19 vaccine: First person receives Pfizer jab in UK Published 2 hours ago Share Related Topics Coronavirus pandemic media captionMargaret Keenan was given the vaccine by May Parsons, a matron at University Hospital in Coventry A UK grandmother has become the first person in the world to be given the Pfizer Covid-19 jab as part of a mass vaccination programme. Margaret Keenan, who turns 91 next week, said the injection she received at 06:31 GMT was the "best early birthday present “
  6. Is this not already the state of society at least in most countries ?
  7. https://m.tribuneindia.com/news/punjab/father-of-fibre-optics-and-patron-of-sikh-arts-narinder-singh-kapany-dies-at-94-179849 Father of fibre optics and patron of Sikh arts Narinder Singh Kapany dies at 94 Dr Kapany’s research on fibre optic communications, lasers, bio-medical instrumentation, solar energy and pollution monitoring led him to gather more than 100 patents. Posted: Dec 04, 2020 09:46 AM Updated: 11 hours ago
  8. Really Veerji ? Not heard that before
  9. Sure, but when you know Amritdharis who are nitnemi and live very shudh lives who seem like sheep and believe everything they see in the media without question/ulterior motive, then how would you build up 'kamaiy'?
  10. https://www.england.nhs.uk/2020/11/nhs-to-pilot-potentially-revolutionary-blood-test/ An innovative blood test that may spot more than 50 types of cancer will be piloted by the NHS in a world-leading programme, chief executive Sir Simon Stevens announced today. The Galleri blood test, developed by GRAIL, can detect early stage cancers through a simple blood test, and will be piloted with 165,000 patients in a world-first deal struck by NHS England. Research on patients with signs of cancer has already found that the test, which checks for molecular changes, can identify many types that are difficult to diagnose early, such as head and neck, ovarian, pancreatic, oesophageal and some blood cancers. If the NHS programme shows the test also works as expected for people without symptoms it will be rolled out to become routinely available. The test could help meet the NHS Long Term Plan goal of increasing the proportion of cancers caught early, which can be the key to reducing cancer mortality. Patients whose condition is diagnosed at ‘stage one’ typically have between five and 10 times the chance of surviving compared with those found at ‘stage four’. NHS Chief Executive Sir Simon Stevens said: “While the good news is that cancer survival is now at a record high, over a thousand people every day are newly diagnosed with cancer. Early detection – particularly for hard-to-treat conditions like ovarian and pancreatic cancer – has the potential to save many lives. This promising blood test could therefore be a game-changer in cancer care, helping thousands more people to get successful treatment. This trial again confirms that the NHS is at the forefront of cutting edge treatments and technology.” In England, around half of cancers are currently diagnosed at stage one or two but the NHS Long Term Plan is aiming to increase that to three quarters by 2028. The GRAIL pilot, which is due to start in mid-2021, will involve 165,000 people. That will include 140,000 participants aged 50 to 79 who have no symptoms but will have annual blood tests for three years. People will be identified through NHS records and approached to take part. Anyone with a positive test will be referred for investigation in the NHS. Another 25,000 people with possible cancer symptoms will also be offered testing to speed up their diagnosis after being referred to hospital in the normal way. Results of these studies would be expected by 2023, and if outcomes are positive, then they would be expanded to involve around one million participants across 2024 and 2025. Health and Social Care Secretary, Matt Hancock said: “We are building a world leading diagnostics industry in the UK – not just for coronavirus but for other diseases too. This exciting and ground-breaking new blood test from GRAIL will give us another tool to give more people the very best chance of survival, demonstrating how the UK continues to lead the way in using the latest innovative treatments to help patients. “Many of us know a loved one who has battled against cancer and have seen first-hand the impact of this deadly disease.” Professor Peter Johnson, National Clinical Director for Cancer at NHS England and improvement said: “The NHS has set itself an ambitious target, to find three-quarters of cancers at an early stage, when they have the highest chance of cure. Tests like this may help us get there far faster, and I am excited to see how this cutting-edge technology will work out, as we test it in clinics across the NHS.” Sir Harpal Kumar, President of GRAIL Europe, said: “The Long Term Plan for cancer is one I’ve been immensely supportive of since it was published, and I applaud the NHS and the government for setting out these ambitious goals and road map to diagnosing cancers earlier. “Galleri, a simple blood test that’s capable of detecting more than 50 cancers, is a ground-breaking and potentially life-saving advance that could have a tremendous human and economic benefit. “Grail is thrilled to partner with the NHS and UK government to support the NHS Long Term Plan for earlier cancer diagnosis, and we are eager to bring our technology to patients in the UK as quickly as we can. I’m delighted we have the opportunity to work together to see if we can save many thousands more lives from cancer in the UK every year.” Lord David Prior, Chair of NHS England said: “Every year nearly 200,000 people in the UK die from cancer. Many of these people are diagnosed too late for treatment to be effective. This collaboration between the NHS and GRAIL offers the chance for a wide range of cancers to be diagnosed much earlier and could fundamentally change the outlook for people with cancer.” The NHS has rolled out ‘Covid-friendly’ cancer treatments to keep patients safer during the pandemic in a £160 million initiative. NHS patients were also the first in Europe to benefit from a full access deal on breakthrough CAR-T therapy for previously untreatable cancers. NHS England has also recently done a deal to make a transformative treatment for cystic fibrosis, Kaftrio, available to thousands of patients. @MisterrSingh @jkvlondon Be interested on your thoughts. Another 'game' being played by 'them'? Also, Harpal Kumar From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia Jump to navigationJump to search Harpal Kumar Born 1965 (age 54–55) Alma mater St. John's College, Cambridge Harvard Business School Website www.cancerresearchuk.org/about-us/how-we-are-run/chief-executive-and-executive-board Sir Harpal Singh Kumar (born 1965) is a British medical researcher who was the chief executive officer of Cancer Research UK[1][2][3] until June 2018,[4] when he left the charity to become Head of Johnson & Johnson Innovation EMEA.[5] Contents 1Early life and education 2Career 3Awards and honours 4Personal life 5See also 6References Early life and education[edit] Kumar's parents were refugees. As Sikhs, they chose to leave what was to become Pakistan and move to India, where they ended up in refugee camps. Later they moved to England, where his father was employed sweeping factory floors, before eventually starting his own grocery store.[6] Kumar attended Latymer Upper School, Hammersmith, and St. John's College, Cambridge, where he gained a Master of Engineering degree and a Master of Arts degree and won the Mobil Prize, Metal Box Prize, and Hughes Prize. He subsequently gained a Master of Business Administration degree with High Distinction as a Baker Scholar at Harvard Business School where he won the Ford Prize and the Wolfe Prize.[7][8]
  11. Lifelong vegetarian. Definitely have some intolerance to lactose, so not a typical big mild drinker for example, as many punjabis are. Veganism has grown massively in recent years. It seems even more popular than vegetarianism. I am aware that the dairy industry is not 'clean' - a lot of 'supplements' like steroids and antibiotics are given to the cows that produce the milk. It seems these cows are probably not treated very well, e.g. live in overcroded conditions, and are likely being 'milked' (excuse the pun) as much as possible which probably is not too healthy for them and the subsequent milk produced. A couple of thoughts/queries on this. Why is milk so revered and such a big part of the Indian/Hindu culture, of which Sikhi is closely linked (but different)? Was milk in the older days different? Is there such a big difference between buffalo vs cow's milk? Is milk from goats for example any good? Milk is supposedly a great source of calcium and therefore essential for bone health, but I understand the Japanese are very low consumers of dairy and have the lowest rates of osteoporosis worldwide- is there something different in their lifestyle that protects their bones? A majority of meat-free vegan food and staple of vegan diets is soya which seems to contain and/or promote estrogen production - is this another game being played by 'them' to change society and feminise it ? Hopefully what I have said makes sense. @jkvlondon - especially awaiting your views!
  12. I feel exactly the same as you But what would be the end game and who would this game be beneficial to ?
  13. Everyone having it or not? @jkvlondon ?
  14. Don’t look much alike to me ive been told Sant Mohinder Singh Ji (Rara Sahib/Jarg) said Sobha Singh’s picture of 1st Guru was very good as it most resembles 1st Guru true likeness
  15. https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-kent-55021836 Woman guilty of fake cancer GoFundMe fundraising fraud Published 1 hour ago IMAGE COPYRIGHTPA MEDIA image captionNicole Elkabbas claimed she had ovarian cancer A woman who faked a cancer diagnosis to claim more than £45,000 in donations has been convicted of fraud. Nicole Elkabbas, 42, set up an online fundraising campaign, claiming she needed money to pay for private treatment for ovarian cancer. But police began an investigation after a doctor, who had recently given her the all-clear, raised suspicions. Elkabbas, of Broadstairs, Kent, pleaded not guilty and told Canterbury Crown Court she had believed she had cancer. Judge Mark Weekes said Elkabbas had been convicted on "clear and compelling evidence" and should expect a custodial sentence. image captionThe fundraising campaign included a picture taken while she had been receiving routine gallbladder treatment, the court heard Ben Irwin, prosecuting, earlier told the court Elkabbas's actions had been "utterly dishonest". In February 2017, she set up a GoFundMe campaign, which said she had just weeks to raise money for a major surgery in Spain. She claimed a costly "breakthrough drug" could improve her chances, and included an image of her lying in a hospital bed. 'Staged' photo However, the court heard the image had actually been taken during routine gallbladder treatment several months earlier. Mr Irwin said the "obvious lie" was built around the photo, which had been "staged to convince people that she was seriously unwell". After she "tricked" people into donating, she "frittered" the money on foreign travel, football tickets and online gambling, Mr Irwin said. She will be sentenced on 5 February for one count of fraud by false representation and another of possessing criminal property. GoFundMe said all donations made to Elkabbas through the site were refunded last year after misuse allegations were raised.
  16. From a Sikh family it seems https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/entertainment-arts-54854273 Four years ago, 17-year-old Kamal Singh, was just finishing school and taking his first ballet class. Now 21, the son of a rickshaw driver has become the first Indian dancer to win a place on the English National Ballet School's professional trainee programme. https://twitter.com/kapoorkkunal/status/1306121542359605249?s=20 Living in Chelsea - a world away from his family and home in Vikaspuri, Delhi - Kamal spends his days, masked and socially distanced, training in a dance studio in Battersea with just 12 other students. They all share the dream of joining a major international ballet company and making it to the role of principal - of treading in the footsteps of Nureyev and Fonteyn. For Kamal, none of it would have been possible without the support of his teacher, Argentine dancer Fernando Aguilera - and a dusting of Bollywood star power. "When I heard I had got a place at the English National Ballet school I was so happy, but at the same time, I was a little sad because I knew my father could not pay the fees," recalls Kamal. "But my teacher tells me not to worry about the money, to just focus on the ballet - and dance." IMAGE COPYRIGHTPHOTOGRAPHY BY ASH image captionHis daily classes in London are socially distanced and masks must be worn. https://twitter.com/kapoorkkunal/status/1306121542359605249?s=20 From the moment Kamal walked into one of his free trial classes at the Imperial Fernando Ballet Company in Delhi, Aguilera knew he had discovered an exceptional talent. But the teenager could not afford to study ballet. His home was two hours away from the ballet school. His father works two jobs, and all hours, to support his family. Luxuries - like ballet tuition - were not an option. So it fell to Aguilera to convince Kamal's parents - and find a way forward. Over three intense years of training, he provided Kamal with free tuition, a room in his home in Delhi and, ultimately, helped raise the fees that would allow Kamal to travel to London to take up his place at the prestigious English National Ballet school. Fees for the year-long course at the ballet school cost £8,000, and then there are living expenses. It was out of Kamal's reach - until the pair turned to crowdfunding. Their chosen crowdfunding platform, Ketto, was co-founded by Bollywood actor Kunal Kapoor, who - in turn - used his star power and social network on the young dancer's behalf. It prompted friend and fellow Bollywood star Hrithik Roshan to pledge £3,200 to the fund. <blockquote class="twitter-tweet"><p lang="en" dir="ltr">Kamal Singh is a 20-year old ballet dancer from Vikaspuri, Delhi who discovered ballet just 4 years back. He comes from a very humble background, his father is an e-rickshaw driver and he attended the local government boys school.. contd <a href="https://t.co/L4tTAQB2CY">pic.twitter.com/L4tTAQB2CY</a></p>&mdash; Kunal Kapoor (@kapoorkkunal) <a href="https://twitter.com/kapoorkkunal/status/1306121542359605249?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">September 16, 2020</a></blockquote> <script async src="https://platform.twitter.com/widgets.js" charset="utf-8"></script> In a matter of weeks, Kamal's fund had reached £18,000. Today, almost £21,000 has been donated. And the money is still coming in. "I have received a lot of support from the Indian community," says Kamal. "My maestro has a lot of new students who want to study ballet in India, after seeing my news. They really got inspired. "I am hoping with my achievements, more people in India will chose ballet as a career." Until now, international Indian ballet stars have been a rarity. "Talent sometimes can be hidden in places where you never think of," says Viviana Durante, a former principal dancer with the Royal Ballet and artistic director at the English National Ballet School. She selected Kamal for the programme - based solely on his online application - and has been impressed by his focus and versatility in class. "Indian dancing is actually quite close to classical ballet - in the way they express themselves with their hands, and their upper body and their arms," she observes. "It's up to us to make ballet more available to other cultures, to educate them and embrace them into our world. "You need dancers who bring their own stories, their own culture - it makes it exciting. "Dance is a language that we all speak. Money should not come into it." Bollywood inspiration Kamal describes his first glimpse of ballet - less than five years ago - as "a turning point". "Right from the beginning, I always wanted to do something different," says Kamal. "I wanted to dance, but my parents were not taking me seriously. "Then, four years ago, I saw the Bollywood movie ABCD (Any Body Can Dance) and I saw ballet for the first time. It was a turning point." The young Kamal marvelled at "boys lifting girls with one hand and catching them... the jumping, the turning, the en pointe". "Ballet requires you to work every muscle. It requires strength and stamina. Every day you have to work out. Every day you have to practise. "In my mind, there is no comparison to ballet." IMAGE COPYRIGHTPHOTOGRAPHY BY ASH image captionDurante says 70% of students at the English National Ballet School receive some sort of financial support It's been a month since Kamal arrived in London and the misty November nights are drawing in. His rigorous training follows a strict schedule, interrupted only by long walks around the capital, trips to the shops to seek out his favourite Indian foods and catching up with his family on WhatsApp. He lives alone, but insists he is not lonely. "Ballet is not for everybody. It's for those who are smart - physically - but most of all, mentally. Anybody can learn the techniques. But often it's about keeping your head - and positivity." Durante, who teaches Kamal, agrees: "You train the dancer, but you're actually training the person - you are helping the person to grow and to be the best of themselves. "The stakes are high and you have to do your best to stay optimistic. You have to be very resilient. "It's not an easy career - it's a short career - but it's very addictive. Once you start you don't want to let it go." IMAGE COPYRIGHTPHOTOGRAPHY BY ASH image captionJoel Kioko says it's his job to make the audience "feel amazing" This year, there are only three boys on the English National Ballet trainee programme, and all come from somewhere where ballet was not an obvious, or easy, career choice. Fellow student Joel Kioko shares Kamal's determination to succeed - after an equally difficult start, growing up in Kenya. Joel, 20, is longing to take his place in a ballet company. Having already studied at the English National Ballet School for three years, he says the trainee programme is about "perfecting his craft". "What I really want at the end is to get out of 2020 - and have a job. I want to be a ballet dancer so badly!" He, like Kamal, relies on the support of a private sponsor to pay for his studies. He can rarely afford to travel home and misses family gatherings in his village, the food and the sunshine. He believes the costs involved in becoming a ballet dancer - and race - are still barriers to success. "It shouldn't be that expensive for someone to take a class. It's so expensive. And then you have to get a leotard or some ballet shoes... I have seen this, when I am back at home in Kenya, teaching. "There is so much needed to get that one kid in class. And then you put them in that class and they look in the mirror, and it's only them - the whole class is different. "You have to be tough-minded." IMAGE COPYRIGHTPHOTOGRAPHY BY ASH image captionJose says boys at his elementary school in Mexico thought dancing was only for girls For Jose Hurtardo, 20, ballet runs in the family: both his parents were dancers and his younger brother is attending the same Mexican ballet school where he himself trained. "My first class was when I was five years old, but I already knew everything because that's basically all we talked about in my family!" Even so, his parents thought a career in ballet was "too hard" - and he relates being picked on at school where football was king. He too is supported by scholarships and sponsorship - but he is convinced the ballet world is "definitely changing". "I am a boy, I'm Mexican. Joel is a black guy from Africa. Kamal is from India - it's crazy how we all get to do ballet now. "I feel really supported. And I can dance, every day."
  17. Sikh Cop In Aayush Sharma's Antim Avya Sharma, 18 Nov 2020 https://www.missmalini.com/2020/11/18/salman-khan-to-play-a-sikh-cop-in-aayush-sharmas-antim/amp Aayush Sharma and Salman Khan (Source: Instagram | @aaysharma) According to reports, Salman Khan is all set to play the character of Sikh cop in Mahesh Manjrekar‘s directorial, Antim: The Final Truth. The gangster drama will also see Aayush Sharma portraying a Marathi Gangster. According to the latest report in Bollywood Hungama, the filmmaker’s next is going to be larger than life film. It is the official remake of the Marathi hit, Mulshi Pattern. The publication quoted the source as saying— “The cop being Sikh is the sole reason for Salman to do Antim, as he hasn’t done a character like this before. He is beefing up, increasing his beard as he will be seen playing a tough, intense and real Sikh cop, and wear the turban too. There are larger than life elements in the script, but this cop has his own swag, and style of functioning. It’s more like how a cop would be in real life, unlike his other cops which are more commercial and heroic.” Talking about Aayush Sharma’s character, the source revealed— “It’s more like Salman’s version of a Sikh Cop and A Marathi Gangster minus the abuses and vulgar scenes of Sacred Games. He is attempting to make an intense gangster film this time around and trying to play a rather mature character that blends well with his age. However, his cop is more of a supporting character as the entire story revolves around brother in law, Aayush Sharma’s gangster
  18. Looks like War preparations? https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-54988870 UK military to get biggest spending boost in 30 years Published 2 hours ago IMAGE COPYRIGHTEPA image captionThe armed forces are protecting people in a broader range of areas than ever, the government said, such as by helping with coronavirus testing (pictured) The largest military investment in 30 years is set to be announced by the prime minister - an extra £4bn a year over the next four years. The money will fund space and cyber defence projects such as an artificial intelligence agency, and could create 40,000 new jobs, the government said. Boris Johnson said it would help the UK to "bolster our global influence". The Ministry of Defence's annual budget is around £40bn, so the £16.5bn over four years is about a 10% increase. The extra spending is on top of the Conservatives' 2019 manifesto commitment. Then, the government pledged to increase defence spending by 0.5% above the inflation rate, which is currently at 0.7%, for every year of the current Parliament. So based on forecasts of inflation, the government said it expects the Ministry of Defence (MoD) to get a total overall increase of about £24.1bn over four years, compared with last year's budget. 'This is our chance' Mr Johnson said on Wednesday evening that he was making the announcement "in the teeth" of the coronavirus pandemic because "the defence of the realm must come first". "The international situation is more perilous and more intensely competitive than at any time since the Cold War," he added. The PM said in order for Britain to "be true to our history and stand alongside our allies" it must make improvements "across the board". "This is our chance to end the era of retreat, transform our armed forces, bolster our global influence, unite and level up our country, pioneer new technology and defend our people and way of life," he said. This is a big win for Defence Secretary Ben Wallace, who's been fighting hard for a significant increase in defence spending and a long-term financial settlement to end what he calls a cycle of overambitious, under-funded defence reviews of the past. The Treasury had been arguing for a much smaller annual increase. But Mr Wallace found an ally in the PM, who says his first priority is defence of the realm. Boris Johnson also believes it'll boost Britain's place in the world and create jobs. The extra money will be used to modernise the armed forces with more spent on robots, autonomous systems and meeting new threats in the domains of space and cyber. Despite the palpable relief inside the MoD it still has to fill a £13bn black hole in its equipment budget. Difficult decisions about cutting old equipment to fund the new are still to be made. The MoD, which doesn't have a strong track record of balancing its books, now has to prove it can spend wisely. And good news for defence might also mean bad news for other government departments - there's already speculation the international aid budget could be cut. The prime minister will set out further details in a virtual speech to the House of Commons on Thursday. He will do so from 10 Downing Street, where he continues to self-isolate after coming into contact with an MP who later tested positive for Covid-19. As part of the speech, Mr Johnson will announce: A new agency dedicated to artificial intelligence The creation of a national cyber force to protect people from online harm A new "space command", which will be capable of launching a first rocket in 2022 The projects are expected to create up to 10,000 jobs annually across the UK, for the next four years, the government said. Defence Secretary Ben Wallace said the jobs and business opportunities being created by the investment would bring "prosperity to every corner of the UK", helping the country to "build back" from the coronavirus pandemic. Conservative MP and defence select committee chairman Tobias Ellwood said: "This is a lot of money but ultimately there are still huge financial pressures facing our armed forces." But he said the "key takeaway" for him was the "message this sends to the British people, to the MoD as well, that we want to be back as a strong power capability". "That message is being heard loud and clear in the White House where the new occupant has made it very, very clear indeed, that he wants to reset Western resolve," Mr Ellwood said. The announcement is part of the first conclusions of the government's Integrated Review which looks at security, defence, development and foreign policy. PM launches review to 'overhaul' foreign policy Government to stop takeovers that risk UK security UK defence secretary denies plan to mothball tanks Labour's shadow defence secretary John Healey said the extra money would give "a welcome and long-overdue upgrade to Britain's defences after a decade of decline". He also called for highly trained troops to be "at the heart" of the review, above high-tech weapons systems. "Ministers must not repeat the mistakes of the last two Conservative defence reviews," he said
  19. This namesake of the object of the thread, also named Param, from 'City Sikhs'
  20. from bbc Lord Ahmed retires from Parliament days before expulsion By Richard Watson BBC Newsnight Published 2 hours ago IMAGE COPYRIGHTUK PARLIAMENT image captionThe Lords Conduct Committee concluded Lord Ahmed emotionally and sexually exploited a vulnerable woman A member of the House of Lords retired from Parliament after seeing a conduct report recommending he be expelled for sexually exploiting a vulnerable woman. The Lords Conduct Committee concluded Lord Ahmed of Rotherham emotionally and sexually exploited Tahira Zaman, who came to him for help in 2017. The inquiry into his behaviour followed a BBC Newsnight investigation. Lord Ahmed said the allegations in the report were not true and he would appeal against the decision. Ms Zaman said she was "elated and relieved" at the report's findings. 'I was looking for help' The Lords Conduct Committee report concluded Lord Ahmed had exploited Ms Zaman, despite knowing she was receiving treatment for anxiety and depression. The Lords Commissioner for Standards, Lucy Scott-Moncrieff, said this "exacerbates the seriousness" of his breaches of the code of conduct. Ms Zaman told Newsnight last year: "I was looking for help and he took advantage of me, he abused his power." She said she had approached Lord Ahmed because she thought he could help her get the Metropolitan Police to investigate a faith healer who she believed was exploiting women. Lord Ahmed wrote to the Met Police Commissioner on headed paper on 2 March, and he and Ms Zaman met at a restaurant in east London in February 2017 to discuss the case. After dinner, Ms Zaman alleged that Lord Ahmed groped her upper thigh. On the balance of probabilities, the Commissioner for Standards' investigation found that Lord Ahmed had sexually assaulted her. Ms Zaman says she was shocked by his behaviour and broke off contact. But, encouraged by a friend, she messaged Lord Ahmed on 14 July that year to ask if he had received a reply from the police. He said he had and they arranged to meet at his house in east London to discuss it. She told Newsnight last year: "He was saying I'm beautiful and, you know, he really likes me." Later that evening, in September 2017, she had sex with him. The Commissioner for Standards concludes: "I find that it is more likely than not that Ms Zaman went to Lord Ahmed's house at his invitation to discuss the offer made by the police to meet her. "However, he had no intention of forwarding her concerns to the police and his use of the offer of a meeting made in the letter from the police to lure Ms Zaman to his house was dishonest." image captionTahira Zaman complained about Lord Ahmed's behaviour to the Lords' Commissioner for Standards Lord Ahmed continued to pursue her and Ms Zaman felt they were entering into a relationship. They messaged each other frequently. She says they continued to meet at Lord Ahmed's house where they had sex. But Ms Zaman says that after two months he made it clear he wasn't going to leave his wife and the affair ended. She says she realised she had been exploited. Ms Zaman first complained to the House of Lords about Lord Ahmed's behaviour in January 2018. She approached Newsnight after the Commissioner for Standards told her Lord Ahmed could not be investigated because the code of conduct only covered his parliamentary "duties" - mainly proceedings of the House of Lords. Newsnight investigation Newsnight began to investigate the Lords' decision not to accept Ms Zaman's complaint, for a film broadcast in February last year. Interviewed by Newsnight, Lord Carlile QC, a former deputy high court judge, said the Commissioner for Standards had "got it wrong", adding: "If someone comes to you for help, particularly if they're vulnerable and you form a sexual relationship, actually that's disgraceful." The Commissioner for Standards denied this, telling Newsnight that was a misunderstanding of the code of conduct. Ten weeks after the film was broadcast, the House of Lords changed the wording of the code to cover parliamentary "activities", rather than just "duties". It was retrospective and so covered Lord Ahmed's behaviour. Ms Zaman re-submitted her complaint, which led to a detailed investigation by the Commissioner for Standards. 'I wanted justice' Responding to the report, Ms Zaman said: "I feel elated and relieved because the whole experience for me was quite traumatising. I'm still digesting, digesting it. "I keep on telling myself that I've got what I wanted - I wanted justice." Lord Ahmed said: "I am extremely disappointed by the report of the conduct committee, which is based on a flawed and unfair investigation process. "I have always said, and maintain, that the allegations contained in the report are not true. "Given this, I am now going to continue pursuing my appeal to the European Court of Human Rights to remedy this injustice."
  21. Given she probably grew up in a very 'white', upper class environment, what type of man were you expecting her to marry ?
  22. free speech being taken away, and the UK meant to be a democracy?! https://news.sky.com/story/amp/covid-19-labour-demands-emergency-law-to-stamp-out-anti-vax-content-on-social-media-12132887 COVID-19: Labour demands emergency law to stamp out anti-vax content on social media The government insists it has secured a major commitment from Facebook, Twitter and Google to tackle anti-vax disinformation. Sunday 15 November 2020 06:36, UK A demonstrator carries an anti-vaccination sign at a protest action against restrictions imposed during the novel coronavirus COVID-19 pandemic, outside Downing Street, central London on October 10, 2020 Image: Labour says the 'spread of disinformation online presents a real and present danger' Anti-vaccination content should be "stamped-out" on social media, Labour has said. With hopes rising of a COVID-19 jab being rolled out by the end of the year, the opposition has called for emergency legislation to "stamp out dangerous anti-vax content". The party wants the government to bring forward legislation that would include financial and criminal penalties for companies that fail to act against such content. Is Pfizer-BioNTech vaccine safe and will it work? Is Pfizer-BioNTech vaccine safe and will it work? Labour has claimed dedicated anti-vaccination groups with, hundreds of thousands of members on social media, are "churning out disinformation" on the issue. Shadow culture secretary Jo Stevens and shadow health secretary Jonathan Ashworth have written to Culture Secretary Oliver Dowden insisting that the "spread of disinformation online presents a real and present danger" to vaccination efforts. Advertisement Ms Stevens said: "The government has a pitiful track record on taking action against online platforms that are facilitating the spread of disinformation. "It has been clear for years that this is a widespread and growing problem and the government knows, because Labour has been warning them for some time, that it poses a real threat to the take up of the vaccine. against restrictions imposed during the novel coronavirus COVID-19 pandemic, outside Downing Street, central London on October 10, 2020 Labour says the 'spread of disinformation online presents a real and present danger' Anti-vaccination content should be "stamped-out" on social media, Labour has said. With hopes rising of a COVID-19 jab being rolled out by the end of the year, the opposition has called for emergency legislation to "stamp out dangerous anti-vax content". The party wants the government to bring forward legislation that would include financial and criminal penalties for companies that fail to act against such content. Labour has claimed dedicated anti-vaccination groups with, hundreds of thousands of members on social media, are "churning out disinformation" on the issue. Shadow culture secretary Jo Stevens and shadow health secretary Jonathan Ashworth have written to Culture Secretary Oliver Dowden insisting that the "spread of disinformation online presents a real and present danger" to vaccination efforts. Ms Stevens said: "The government has a pitiful track record on taking action against online platforms that are facilitating the spread of disinformation. "It has been clear for years that this is a widespread and growing problem and the government knows, because Labour has been warning them for some time, that it poses a real threat to the take up of the vaccine "This is literally a matter of life and death and anyone who is dissuaded from being vaccinated because of this is one person too many." Labour insisted that government involvement with social media platforms, aimed at anti-vaccination content, did not go far enough. The two shadow cabinet ministers said in their letter to the culture secretary: "What we need is action now and - since these companies have been unable to take action themselves - we are calling on the government to introduce emergency legislation which would include financial and criminal penalties for continued failure to act. Prof Van-Tam says he would take COVID vaccine "Labour would give the government the votes it needs to get such a bill through the House of Commons." A government spokesperson said: "Letting vaccine disinformation spread unchecked could cost British lives. "We take this issue extremely seriously and have secured a major commitment from Facebook, Twitter and Google to tackle it by not profiting from such material, and by responding to flagged content more swiftly." "This is literally a matter of life and death and anyone who is dissuaded from being vaccinated because of this is one person too many." Labour insisted that government involvement with social media platforms, aimed at anti-vaccination content, did not go far enough. The two shadow cabinet ministers said in their letter to the culture secretary: "What we need is action now and - since these companies have been unable to take action themselves - we are calling on the government to introduce emergency legislation which would include financial and criminal penalties for continued failure to act. Prof Van-Tam says he would take COVID vaccine "Labour would give the government the votes it needs to get such a bill through the House of Commons." A government spokesperson said: "Letting vaccine disinformation spread unchecked could cost British lives. "We take this issue extremely seriously and have secured a major commitment from Facebook, Twitter and Google to tackle it by not profiting from such material, and by responding to flagged content more swiftly."
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