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MisterrSingh

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Everything posted by MisterrSingh

  1. Punjab's political leadership is low-iq. I don't like throwing around labels such as these, as if I'm some leading light or anything like that, but they are crusty old men who are nothing more than puppets of the Indian government (Congress or BJP, it doesn't matter), who've been promised their provincial seats of power in exchange for unquestioning obedience to the ruling power in Delhi. For that guaranteed support the likes of Badal and his fake opponents, are prepared to betray their people and their state in order to claw onto their political power. They are nothing more than parasites and traitors. But the people bear a huge responsibility for this problem. The people are all over the shop. When one looks at that society, one can't help but be reminded of the saying, "The people receive the leadership they deserve."
  2. I'll tell you what we shouldn't succumb to: the other extreme of the madrassa-style, un-thinking, oppressive drilling of beliefs into young minds without vichaar and discourse. Short-term it arguably bolsters the impression that a religion or a group is thriving due to the obstinate and passionate manner of its adherents, but long-term, as we're seeing with Islamic apostacy movements in the West AND its traditional strongholds in the Middle East (where the internet has allowed previously isolated people to voice their experiences even under the guise of anonymity), such methods are sowing the seeds for future dissent and damage to the religion. What I find disappointing in the emerging Sikh generations in the West who are culturally Punjabi but don't really have any serious working knowledge of the religion (or in some cases are labouring under misconceptions), is that there's an alarming lack of humility when approaching Sikhi. Of course, respect can come after some form of understanding has developed. I think what they're doing is transposing general Western attitudes to the Abrahamic faiths -- that sneering, hostile attitude towards the idea of religion as something that's outmoded and antiquated -- and adopting that same manner with Sikhi, which to my mind is wrong, because there's no historical or social precedent set by practitioners of the Sikh faith (unlike the undoubted atrocities committed in the name of the Abrahamic religions throughout history) which warrants that kind of behaviour. I don't know, maybe there are reasons that I'm overlooking or haven't experienced which would otherwise inform my opinion on this matter. We could go into psychological or sociological issues pertaining to the Punjabi-Sikh temperament, and how that may -- when exposed to certain circumstances or variables -- manifest in a manner that does us no favours. Is that behaviour or mentality hardwired? Could it be altered? Again, I don't know.
  3. I'm not as hopeful as Singh Ji in regards to the mentality cultivated by the next generation of Sikhs entering the intellectual arena. If they're studying at the same institutions that the rest of their non-Sikh peers are attending, I don't think the contemporary educated Sikh professional is mentally strong enough to resist the ideological indoctrination of the western academic establishment. The environment and the culture is simply too overwhelmingly overbearing for a certain type of person to reject the mainstream orthodoxy, and then reassert their own values in its place as a viable alternative. Blog articles and social media posts from these Sikhs offer a telling insight into how Sikhi in the West is gradually being shaped into being the "Indic" religious arm of broader far-left liberalism. I'm afraid we've unwittingly developed a generation of Ram Rais willing to kowtow to the ruling mainstream at the expense of the unassailable norms of their faith. We aren't like Muslims who constantly need to defend their abhorrent scriptures by performing mental gymnastics in order to defend the indefensible, yet I don't see much evidence of so-called "educated" Sikhs retaining the classic Sikh combativeness in purely intellectual terms. Acquiescing to pressure from ideological opponents has somehow become a virtue for Sikhs, as if we're in a race to bow and scrape our beliefs away in a wish to be as inoffensive as possible. Our innate values of pluralism and ethos of, "I won't bother you if you won't bother me," has been warped by our own people. Maybe there's a gupt fauj of truly, spiritually "woke" young Sikhs who have somehow managed to avoid the brainwashing and the tempting lure of bland inoffensiveness (as it relates to the popular causes of the time as established by the western intelligentsia) as something to aspire to, but the evidence suggests not.
  4. No wonder you seem hyper, lol. Drop that 5h1t. Drink water. Don't go overboard, just sip throughout the day.
  5. Well, yeah, I'm basing my argument as things are now. Who knows how the geopolitical situation will be in the future.
  6. I can imagine the controversy between Sikhs themselves regarding what type of nation a hypothetical Sikh country should be. Ethno-state or secular? The hardcore will predictably want something akin to a Sikh North Korea, while the far-left Twitter poseurs will be angling for gay-pride parades and trans-Anand Karajs. Let's not be under misapprehensions: from day one India and Pakistan will dedicate a significant portion of their defence budgets to destabilise a Sikh state. They will throw everything they have at it. We'll need our brightest and our best to counteract it all.
  7. I was reading about this recently. The Serbia vs Kosovo conflict was said to be a warm-up / practice for the post-9/11 invasion of Iraq (if you believe it was a pre-planned pretence to enter the Middle East under the guise of "restoring democracy). Clinton and Blair aided the Muslim Albanians in slaughtering Christian Serbians. There was nothing honourable about what happened. The only reason the press, at the time, didn't make a big deal of Western intervention, is because the people being aided were Muslims. So, even when the Western powers do decide to grace others with their benevolence, it usually has some form of vested interest. In this case, as I mentioned, it was a dry run for what they were hoping to kick-off in Afghanistan and Iraq (and, if the theories are to be believed, Syria and Iran, paving the way for the prophesied Greater Israel to re-emerge in that part of the world).
  8. Funny how none of the aforementioned 3 countries have a Central Bank owned by the Rothschilds. The three countries we're constantly told by the media are a threat to peace. Must be a coincidence...
  9. What I do find interesting is how there's a tentative "shaming" of India under Modi, in terms of the Muslim issue in India. If India continues on its current course, I expect that dissent from the West to grow louder in a way that nobody does with sincere gusto with places like Saudi Arabia and China, i.e. countries the West can't afford to pee off despite their questionable records on how they treat certain sections of their respective societies.
  10. India has become "too big" to fail. It won't be allowed to self-destruct. Perhaps there might be some serious blows delivered, but nothing fatal in my opinion.
  11. The ones who belong to devout ministries are as passionate as anyone else, Muslims included. Btw, when referring to these educated theologians, I'm not referring to sober academics; you know, the clinical, inoffensive types. I'm referring to the Christian equivalents of the Dawah group; Christian missionaries. I don't think I made that clear earlier. These are "regular" guys who have felt moved to undertake years of study so they can prolestyse the Christian faith in order that virtually nobody can dispute any of their attempts at converting others such is their comprehensive knowledge of their subject. They are driven by their love for Christ and their belief that Christianity is supreme. That kind of long-term dedication and passion is admirable, because it feeds into the idea that applying oneself to slow, low-yield tasks (an investment -- in this case, time -- that doesn't pay much material benefits) is what the intelligent races do, whereas less intelligent, impatient groups are incapable of applying themselves to a long-term goal, and would rather succumb to a short-term act that yields instant gratification that actually harms the cause in the long-term. Overall, the Christian missionaries are busy at work. They aren't an historical irrelevance of a bygone age of colonialism.
  12. We don't feature in the Bible, that's why. Or at least not in a way that our religions and our mythology can be co-opted to serve their apocalyptic, doomsday scenario that they're determined to create. They want to manufacture the Bible's Revelations into reality. The Vedantic strand are an irrelevance in the grand scheme of things. To understand the world and where it's heading, you've got to understand the Semetic religions as well as their Mesopotamian and Babylonian forebears. All roads eventually lead to Jerusalem. We shouldn't get caught up in our own domestic little issues as if we're the stars of the show. We aren't. At best, we're those extras in the background who try and get their faces into the shot. It's not nice to hear, but once we understand this issue, we can extricate ourselves from their pathetic Semetic games.
  13. You're forgetting one thing. The new "religion" of the information age that the media and the culture is heavily promoting (towards which society has been heading for a few decades now) is that of secularism, i.e. the abandoning of overt religiosity in everyday life. That's the ideal they want to promote. Christianity is attempting to fight a losing battle, but it is still fighting. Islam has been weaponised and let loose for various reasons, political as well as the obvious religious reasons. No Western power is going to revert to a solemn, Byzantine-esque merging of State and Church. The West's "god" is science, but because they've foolishly imported millions of followers of the desert death cult, they need to hamstring everyone else so that their latent jihadis don't chimp out. The elite, academically minded Christian organisations undertaking conversions and preaching aren't State-affiliated at all. And I'm not referring to clown evangelicals who embarrass themselves with their low iq shenanigans. I'm pointing to the groups that know more about the religion and the doctrine of their target than the target themselves.
  14. I can answer this. They believe mankind needs to "come home" to the one true religion. As Christians, they think have a duty to save the lost souls who don't know Christ. It's as simple as that. These guys have incredibly well funded organisations in many countries, staffed by individuals who have studied OTHER religions to PHD level in order to aid them during their conversion process. Of course, different countries and cultures require unique approaches, so with a place like Punjab they'll be unlikely to require a theologian with a tonne of degrees, whereas for their efforts in the UK they would need their best man on the job, not only to proselytise their own doctrine BUT also discredit what they view as their biggest competitor, and the greatest spiritual threat to mankind, Islam. That's the second part of it. Christianity (the non-cucked, non-Anglican sects) has woken up to the Islamic threat, and it's safe to say they have deployed their best to combat Islam's dawah. Honestly, we're pi55ing in the wind. Absolutely clueless. These types of determined Christians dedicate their lives to a "calling" for their faith; they gain degrees and qualifications and arm themselves with this knowledge almost as if going to war. What do we do? Apne get a BSc in Marketing and think they're intellectual giants, which is normally when we turn against the faith itself.
  15. That's a perfect analogy. "Here, take my pocket money and my lunch, but please don't hit me. Are we friends, now?"
  16. One of the funniest things I've heard in recent times is when someone said regarding the Rohingya issue: "How f*****g unbearable must a religion and its followers (Islam) be, that it forces BUDDHISTS to become militant in order to reassert themselves?" Lmao, the media only ever presents the results of the fightback, yet why do they never broach the reasons for why a group like the Buddhists had to resort to those means? And why is it only where there's a growing Muslim population in a country where they are a minority -- as they edge closer to that magic 10% population mark -- where these things happen? It's almost as if the response to Islamic encroachment arises because Muslims decide to instigate the next part of their plan once they've reached a certain demographical number where they feel they can "affect" matters in society... hmmmm....
  17. This is a claim that's being picked up in recent times by Hindutva types, and they are debunking it with vigour. I've only ever heard this sentiment expressed by hyped-up parcharaks. It's misleading.
  18. ^^^ I've never understood the sakhiyan of Muslims getting their prayers answered by attending Sikh Gurdwaras or visiting Sikh saints and mahapursh, yet not once has any Sikh told them to convert now that they've got their heart's desire; the very thing their "beloved" Islam failed to provide for them, that they had to enter the kaffir's domain to receive true spiritual blessings. No, our lot just send them happily on their way back into Islam's stifling embrace. Bunch of cucks we are.
  19. Just a theory. Be open to all the possibilities. For those of us in the West it's a two-pronged struggle compared to India.
  20. I agree with all of this, yet I must say I kind of understand the reservations expressed by the NSYF on the previous page. I personally don't think it's a RAW conspiracy, but I think certain white organisations who are under the radar and biding their time until the critical moment before acting themselves, MIGHT be involved. I'm not referring to the clown outfits and MI5-infiltrated EDL, Britain First. I think we might be used to gauge what the general reaction might be to a "soft" backlash against Muslims in the UK, specifically if they start attacking our Gurdwareh. It'll be Enoch Powell's prophetic words come true (he predicted that the immigrant population would import their old communal conflicts into this country). Depending on the subsequent media and public reaction (whether it's "Sikhs had no choice but to defend themselves" or "How dare Sikhs target those poor innocent Muslims"), an observing third party will then base their own actions around the general reception to our response. So, just be mindful of these games. There's a hell of a lot going on that not many understand. The game is complex and layered. It's dirty.
  21. Do keep digging. Don't be afraid to expose yourself to ideas even if you don't agree with them. Your shardaa will never lead you down a blind alley.
  22. You are dangerously naive. I'm actually worried what you'll do when you'll wake up one day in the future and realise how badly you've been mislead.
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