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Any Strength Trainers? What Are Your Stats, How Long Did It Take And What'S Your Diet?


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vjkk vjkf,

As the title states I'm posting to see if any there are any strength training veers on this board. I'd also like to know what your current stats are, how long it took for you to reach those stats, what your body weight is and what your diet is.

The lifts I'm looking at are squats, deadlifts, bench press, overhead press and power cleans.v (1 rep maxes or 5 rep max).

The reason I'm asking is that I seem to stall a fair bit. The routine I'm doing is tried and tested but it may not be for a vegetarian as I don't seem to get linear progress no matter what I try.

My stats:

weight ~ 69kg

training period: 8months

squat: 80kg (3x5)

deadlift 100kg (1x5)

bench press 57.5kg (5 rep max)

over head press: 37.5kg (3x5)

power cleans 50kg (3x5)

For 8 months training my lifts are poor. I'm hoping there are some other singhs/singhnis that do lift and can offer some advice.

vjkk vjkf

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Your routine needs work, but first need to know some things. How often do you train? How much %increase have you seen in your lifts since you started and what's your age?

Why does the routine need work? I dont think it'll get any more basic than this. This is a tried and tested routine:

Workout A:

- squats (3x5)

- bench press (3x5)

- deadlift (1x5)

Workout B:

- squats (3x5)

- overhead press (3x5)

- powercleans (5x3).

I started with the bar on everything (20kg) ...the lifts im at now are posted above, but it took me 8 months just to reach those numbers - pretty laughable. Also, I'm 24.So, I do workout A B A ..x3 a week.. so monday / wed / fri...or tues/thurs/sat..

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The routine itself is fine, it's taken from Mark Rippetoe's book Starting Strength I believe. I'm sure you already know, but in the book Mark strongly recommends that you drink LOTS of milk. I can't recall the exact number he mentioned, you may want to look it up.

First thing I would recommend rather strongly is to get your form checked on every exercise; from a qualified strength training coach preferably. You'd be surprised how much difference it can make. Your progress isn't all that bad, everyone progresses at a different rate. So long as you are making progress, it is fine. If the progress has stalled, it's time to shake things up a little.

I do see you have listed protein sources, but what about good old fashion solid food? What does your diet look like. For any serious trainees, diet will be 70% ish of the effort. If it's not good, you are asking for trouble, no progress, or worse, an injury.

- do you any balance work?

- any rehabilitation work?

- stretching?

- how much rest are you getting?

I'd have to see you do the exercises to really anything more than that.

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The routine itself is fine, it's taken from Mark Rippetoe's book Starting Strength I believe. I'm sure you already know, but in the book Mark strongly recommends that you drink LOTS of milk. I can't recall the exact number he mentioned, you may want to look it up.

First thing I would recommend rather strongly is to get your form checked on every exercise; from a qualified strength training coach preferably. You'd be surprised how much difference it can make. Your progress isn't all that bad, everyone progresses at a different rate. So long as you are making progress, it is fine. If the progress has stalled, it's time to shake things up a little.

I do see you have listed protein sources, but what about good old fashion solid food? What does your diet look like. For any serious trainees, diet will be 70% ish of the effort. If it's not good, you are asking for trouble, no progress, or worse, an injury.

- do you any balance work?

- any rehabilitation work?

- stretching?

- how much rest are you getting?

I'd have to see you do the exercises to really anything more than that.

Yes, this routine is by mark rippetoe - well, he's one of the authors behind the book. It's recommended that you drink 1gallon a day. I was on 1/2 a gallon and it only helped initially. Whilst I was still gaining weight I had stopped gaining strength, therefore I reduced the amount of milk and started focusing on food sources such as cheese.

Form: Believe me when I say this, I have spent countless hours fixing my squat form - ensuring I am using the correct muscles to move the weight and this helped add a further 10kg to my squat. However, you can't really cheat on deadlift and benchpress - if you can't move the weight you simply stall. Infact, bad form doesn't even work on a lift like deadlift - I simply can't move the weight.

In terms of progress I have seen the average guy (both of larger weight class and lower) make linear progress up to an average of 120kg squat / 140kg deadlift / 80kg bench press...all in 3 months - whilst I have been on this routine for 8 months and I'm still struggling at lighter weights.

Diet is the most important aspect of training, I've researched and found this has given the me the greatest progress:

1: oats / milk / strawberries ...whey + water

2. pitta bread + mozzarella cheese + mushrooms + peppers + tomatoes + onions (a mini pizza) x2 + whey

3. heavy cream + milk + whey + beta alanine + creatine

4. huge protein shake (mixture of cottage cheese/oats/whey/strawberries/blue berries = 700 calories) + 2x mini pizza as described before

workout day is slightly different...both days i get 3,000 calories ..275g protein / 333 carbs / 86g fat. All food I consume I measure out. I can continue adding more calories, something I may do.

Stretching: third world squat + something to stretch my quads and overhead squat with arms in the air (practicing keeping back tight whilst squatting). These have really opened up my hip flexors thus allowing me to squat properly.

Rest: 2-5minute rest between sets (more if needed)

sleep: 7.30-8.00hours

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You should try switching your routine and see how it goes, you should do that after about 6 months anyway (if your gains slow) because the body adapts. Rippetoe gives great advice, but everybody reacts differently to exercise.

Also, a huge factor in strength is the central nervous system, I'll post some info up when I have some time. Will also give you some alternative routines. Roughly how tall are you, and how old? Need this info to give the right routine.

Your diet seems ok.

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I agree that the body adapts. You should only be on this routine for around 3-4 months before the gains run out. Basically, if you're adding 7.5kg a week..starting from a 20kg bar for 3 months...you'll be squatting a fairly heavy weight. However, I didn't progress in a linear fashion.

I agree with your comment about CNS...CNS is stimulated greatly during strength training. Indians refer to this as 'jaan'. In terms of routine I have considered moving onto wendlers 531...however I feel that the gains would be far too slow as my lifts are not really at a point where I need to move onto an intermediate routine. But right now, I see no choice - I've looked around for other beginner routines with linear progress but I haven't seen any. I'm open to this, thanks! But please note that I'm looking for strength training routines not bodybuilding, so no bicep curls! :p

height: 5.10

age: 24

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Things you are doing appear to be okay, I'm not sure how much can be changed. At the end of the day, not everyone has the genetic potential to be "strong". If you don't mind me asking, are you training for a specific sport?

Personally, I feel your protein intake is too high. But that would not impact your strength in a negative fashion. It may however impact certain organs of the body. I'm sure you already know this, but it doesn't hurt to get a reminder :)

One thing that stood out from your posts is that your calorie intake = calories spent. While calorie counting is not an exact science, I would encourage you to add 300-500 calories to your daily food intake. Add these in your post workout meals and make them high quality carbs.

I don't see if you have given your typical post workout meal. Of all the meals of the day, that is the most critical to build strength.

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Things you are doing appear to be okay, I'm not sure how much can be changed. At the end of the day, not everyone has the genetic potential to be "strong". If you don't mind me asking, are you training for a specific sport?

Personally, I feel your protein intake is too high. But that would not impact your strength in a negative fashion. It may however impact certain organs of the body. I'm sure you already know this, but it doesn't hurt to get a reminder :)

One thing that stood out from your posts is that your calorie intake = calories spent. While calorie counting is not an exact science, I would encourage you to add 300-500 calories to your daily food intake. Add these in your post workout meals and make them high quality carbs.

I don't see if you have given your typical post workout meal. Of all the meals of the day, that is the most critical to build strength.

Yes, right you are! This meal is my 'highest caloric' intake. However, I eat this meal even when I'm not training, simply because my focus is strength and not aesthetics (getting lean).

I eat the following

-2x pitta bread + tomato sauce + mozzarella cheese + toppings

- pine apple

- cottage cheese

- 250ml milk

- whey

- oats

- peanut butter

- strawberries

^^ all blended together

come out to about 1,400 calories

I've deloaded and now I'm working up again:

squat: 75kg (form breaks on last 2 reps - not bad!)

overhead press: gone up to 40kg

bench: 55kg

powercleans: 50kg

^^

form has improved...all I did was de-load a bit and add more carbs to my lunch...once i start stalling again i will add another one of those mini pizzas to my caloric intake (making it around 400 calories).

In terms of sport - I want strength to be the foundation (squats/deads/bench) ...once I am satisfied with my numbers I want to learn the following arts: muay thai and kendo (unless i find a more practical art in terms of striking with the sword).

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Hmm, no replies!

Are there any strength trainers - what are your lifts and how long did it take for you to get there? diet? routine?

Hello StartingStrengthSikh.

I am no trainer but I have been training with a group of fitness enthusiasts for the 18 months and I have learnt alot.

I am happy to hear that someone wishes to keep fit and active and improve strength. It encourages self-esteem and discipline which we all need to succeed in the goals and dreams we wish to achieve.

I do not know how much I will be able to help just yet but I would like to find out more about your training,diet,etc. Sleep, rest, diet are key players.

Which creatine do you use and how often is your intake?

Do you train with a partner?

How much is your body fat %?

I also recommend changing the order you do your workouts and exercises to keep things interesting.

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Hello StartingStrengthSikh.

I am no trainer but I have been training with a group of fitness enthusiasts for the 18 months and I have learnt alot.

I am happy to hear that someone wishes to keep fit and active and improve strength. It encourages self-esteem and discipline which we all need to succeed in the goals and dreams we wish to achieve.

I do not know how much I will be able to help just yet but I would like to find out more about your training,diet,etc. Sleep, rest, diet are key players.

Which creatine do you use and how often is your intake?

Do you train with a partner?

How much is your body fat %?

I also recommend changing the order you do your workouts and exercises to keep things interesting.

Howdy,

creatine: 5g (have tried 10g also - i may go back to this).

training partner: Nope - would help...but meh.

bodyfat: around 14-15%

in terms of 'change' ...change = heavier weight...no other change is really needed? How can I measure progress if I keep changing exercises (e.g. front squat / hack squat / back squat / low bar squat / high bar squat etc etc). Until the squat it self (in this case low bar squat) has been used as my 'foundation' I don't really need to switch things up.

The only 'change' I am thinking of is moving over the to an intermediate routine - but i really feel at this point that I am not at my 'limit' with beginner gains. The problem with an intermediate routine is that you add weight to the bar weekly/monthly and not regularly (every session). This wouldnt be a problem if my lifts were respectable.

I'm thinking of increasing calories by another 500-700 and see how it goes and then maybe another 500-700 for a 'final push'. I was hoping that there were other sikhs that could perhaps suggest something other than caloric increase as we all share

a) diet needs

b) race? (I've read some studies that show this does make a difference, although not sure how valid this claim is).

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