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Close Tory Business Links To Rich Saudis Hampering War On Isis?


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Not surprising. War profiteering has been occurring since the Middle Ages. The general public are being made mugs. As I said before, it's an insidious sleight of hand.

Yep, and when some of our people want to jump in like heroes, they are being the biggest mugs, with the least to gain.

Have you ever read Catch 22 by Joseph Heller? I found it a really great read but apparently some people struggle with it? It captures the madness and constant shifting of alliances and hypocrisy of war (as we are seeing today) perfectly.

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Have you ever read Catch 22 by Joseph Heller? I found it a really great read but apparently some people struggle with it? It captures the madness and constant shifting of alliances and hypocrisy of war (as we are seeing today) perfectly.

It's on my to-read list along with a few others. I've heard great things about it though. I'll look at making it the next book I pick up. Cheers.

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I might look in the attic and dust off my copy for a re-read myself.

I tell you what, fellas like Heller and Orwell knew the score when it came to the chalakhiyan pulled by governments, and how the ordinary public would be duped by such shenanigans. Nowadays, you won't get any writer exposing the incestuous hegemony of the modern world, because these writers (and journalists) are so reliant on the "system" to pay their bills, it would be career suicide for anyone to speak up. Those who do see themselves as the successors of the likes of Orwell, never reveal the true, unspoken source of much of the world's problems, instead preferring to skirt around the issues and deflect attention from the truth. It's a sick joke.

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I tell you what, fellas like Heller and Orwell knew the score when it came to the chalakhiyan pulled by governments, and how the ordinary public would be duped by such shenanigans. Nowadays, you won't get any writer exposing the incestuous hegemony of the modern world, because these writers (and journalists) are so reliant on the "system" to pay their bills, it would be career suicide for anyone to speak up. Those who do see themselves as the successors of the likes of Orwell, never reveal the true, unspoken source of much of the world's problems, instead preferring to skirt around the issues and deflect attention from the truth. It's a sick joke.

Yeah, and they had direct experience too (both of them). Heller was a pilot in WW2 (Orwell was a policeman in Burma I think). When I first read Heller's book years ago, and it dawned on me that our lot where slap bang in the middle of the mad shenanigans he describes, it played a significant part in my losing that romanticised conception of Singhs in WW2 admirably fighting some noble cause. I tell you, our lot were simpletons in WAY over their heads in terms of knowing what was really going on behind the scenes.

People (especially goray) are more sheep-like and cowardly than ever today, including writers - who we used to rely on to tell the truth. But that is mitigated with free-er movement of information and ideas via the Internet and other social media. There are people like Robert Fisk still but in the deluge of information and disinformation we have today - his is just one voice amongst a babble.

Those old school writers have left their legacy though, in people like us, who now know to question and treat official 'news' with healthy suspicion if not contempt. I just hope the rest of our brothers and sisters catch up before we get muppeted off as a community again.

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I just hope the rest of our brothers and sisters catch up before we get muppeted off as a community again.

Nah, too late. That's not me being negative or defeatist but that's the reality. They're in too deep.

Funny thing is, Guru Sahib opens eyes to exactly the kind of things we're talking about here, yet I ask myself, if most of these individuals in Sikhi who claim to be in His good graces can't see what's happening at the end of their nose, then who or what exactly are they meditating on?

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Nah, too late. That's not me being negative or defeatist but that's the reality. They're in too deep.

Nah man, we aren't of any significance or use outside of petty propaganda in the UK (however long that lasts - Scotland....) If things get deep, we'll have to see what leaders emerge from amongst us.

It would only take a few brutal loses to make a fair few of our lot wake up. Look at the state of us compared to the people we used to eff with not to long ago - Afghans, Turks, Paks. We've lost any international military significance, which isn't a negative because it limits how people can use us like they did in the past - which was a major problem. Most of the types nostalgic about our role in the British imperial system wouldn't last a minute in a street fight, let alone the type of warfare going on around us now.

Where we are potentially strong is at a local level Instead. When we have enough of us (who are strong and conscious) in an area, we can effect it for the better whilst things go pear shaped elsewhere.

In the meanwhile, it looks like other communities have been and will be taking losses (possibly heavy), this is a time to strengthen ourselves and grow whilst other lose their heads (metaphorically and literally). Attacking that sheep-like, gullible, insecure-acceptance seeking mentality a lot of our lot have is a key concern today. Maybe circumstances will force them to wake up to cold reality instead of their cosy dream world?

It isn't negative in my eyes.

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Bottom line for me is I don't trust other Sikhs to get together, take action together, and then see it through to the end. If my life has taught me anything, it's that you can't rely on anyone. For me, it's alone or nothing. We're a dying breed. Most Sikhs in the west (practising of otherwise) are too attached to their comfortable middle class existence to be of any use to anyone. They've been consumed by Maya. When things go pear-shaped - and they will - their only concern will be theirs and their own. Complacent, confused, and cowardly. Good luck to them; they, their children, and their children's children are going to need it. Then watch them come crying at Guru Sahib's door on their hands and knees begging for help. Too late.

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I hear that. Our people have sold their souls to comfort and ego.

In the hypothetical situation you outline above, a lot of those children will see through their parents bull5hit after things go pear shaped.

In our community it seems like every generation or two has its battle to face, Our ancestors faced the ghallugharas; our grandparents faced partition. Later people faced 84. Whatever happens in future will be what that generation was destined to face like those before them.

I'm like you, not too impressed with our lot; BUT, if I know one thing, it's this - if there was ever a community that can come back from heavy losses. It's ours.

Like Rattan Singh Bhangu records, after the ghallugara the ardaas was that the unripe fruit has been purged and only the ripe remain. Maybe that will happen again?

Maybe I'm optimistic because I saw people unite over the grooming thing back when the majority was in denial about it. Those guys won out in the end.

Everything is possible.

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