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genie

Does Kaur mean princess or crown prince?

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Some have been claiming Kaur actually means crown prince and not princess so when Guru Gobind singh ji created the Khalsa and named baptised Sikh men as Singh as lions he is then allegedly have baptised Sikh women as kaurs meaning crown prince (according to feminist revisionists) and not princess?

I find that an absurd notion. The correct and logical meaning has always been kaur means princess because of the gender differences and Guru Ji knew that women preferred to beautify themselves and raise the family and men liked to be the protector and hunter for the family/community. But it seems people are determined to twist sikhi to suit their own anti-nature feminist agenda. I've checked many of the sources from where these people tried to link kaur with rajastani words like kanwar,etc and none of them add up or make logical sense.

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8 minutes ago, genie said:

But it seems people are determined to twist sikhi to suit their own anti-nature feminist agenda.

I'm not sure that's the case. Bhai Jagraj Singh ji said that in his videos and he said that "Kaur" Shabad came from Kooar which comes from Kumar. It's another way of seeing what Khalse should be like.

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3 minutes ago, RajKaregaKhalsa1 said:

I'm not sure that's the case. Bhai Jagraj Singh ji said that in his videos and he said that "Kaur" Shabad came from Kooar which comes from Kumar. It's another way of seeing what Khalse should be like.

Theres several theories where the word "kaur" came from. But I like to think Guru Ji created it as a special title for baptised Sikh females. If we go by the logic it came from kumar or kanwar or some other indian language word then why didnt he just create "singhniya" or let sikh females be refered to as singhs aswell as the men.

It stands to reason there was logic behind why they were princesses because they were to be seen as royality as beautiful women that men would have to honour and protect.

 

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