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Found 57 results

  1. Someone , a nasty relative from punjab threatened me "main tera vyaah ni hon dena . teria main leeka kadhaun" what does it mean "teria leeka kadhaun" (ਤੇਰੀਆਂ ਲੀਕਾਂ ਕਢਾਉਂ) mean ? apparently its a "i will screw you" but I don't understand exact phrase.
  2. Guest

    Please translate

    Wjkk, Wjkf sangat ji, My siblings and I sat our parents down for a serious conversation about their health. They’re getting older & they need to be eating healthier. My dad said that his body isn’t healthy if his food has ਬੈਅ. My question is.. ** WHAT IS ਬੈਅ? Pronunciation: B with short A sound [ back without the ck ] It would be great if someone could let me know what this translates to in English, please. That way, we can do better when we prepare our parents meal plans. As of right now, my parents & other uncles/aunties have given vague explanations of the word ਬੈਅ. (I’m told Fauja Singh said he doesn’t eat things with ਬੈਅ) Thank you, Wjjk, Wjkf
  3. Indian Punjabi woman converts to Islam after visit to Pakistan Not sure if this is true or not, however I have seen it on a lot of websites. If this is true, and I wouldn't be surprised, why? What is the reason that our people are so lenient in comparison to other South Asian religions in marrying out? This isn't only targeted against our women, our men are included as well. However, our women are usually the ones prayed on by Pakistani Muslims for marriage and conversion. I remember asking one of my fellow cousin's Sikh friend who was married to a Hindu man, how they were planning to raise the child, and she blatantly stated that" God is one, doesn't matter what religion he is," and then she continued to tell me how, "the whole family, including the child, go to the Mandir once a week." Are these cases due to a lack of education of fundamental principles, or is it the leniency of Sikh families?
  4. TheeTurbanator

    Answering Arguments Against Sikhi

    NOTE: This post is a work in progress Waheguru Ji Ka Khalsa, Waheguru Ji Ki Fateh! Often times I hear Non-Sikhs bring up common arguments against Sikhi, and as someone who likes to create a lot online resource hubs for Sikhs, I am taking it upon myself to create a list of Q/A's. I recently got a series of arguments (posing as questions) from an anonymous user on the Sikh Reddit who was allegedly Ex-Sikh. He frequently made references to Islam, and also claimed that he had done a lot of research on his "questions", yet the questions themselves seem as if they are taken from wikipedia or some anti-sikh site. Here are some of the arguments I would like to debunk: Q: If Sikhi is against the Caste System, then why are their Caste based Gurdwara's? A: Anyone can just create a "Gurdwara" and install their own beliefs into it, that doesn't make it valid. The key part here is that this cannot be supported by the actual theology of Sikhi, and all the main Gurdwara's still allow people of lower-caste to enter. All of these so called "caste Gurdwara's" are also not backed by the Akal Takth, and are not recognized by the Khalsa Panth. Q: Why were the Gurus themselves all from the Khatri caste and married within their own caste despite preaching against such barriers? A: The very premise of this question is incorrect, Guru isnt from the Khatri caste becuase the concept of caste itself is invalid. There is no evidence to suggest that caste was involved in the marrage decision, and neither was any proposal rejected due to caste. Furthermore, the Siri Guru Granth Sahib Ji itself contains writings from people of different "castes" and backgrounds. When the Guru created the Khalsa Panth, the Panj Pyare were from different occupations, locations, and families, the entire concept of the Khalsa itself destroys the caste system. If the Guru was secretly supporting the caste sustem, he would have not created the Khalsa and passed on the Guruship. Gurbani itself is the Guru, and its anti-caste message is very clear, but it's some food for thought. Q: How about the succession of the Gurus? How do we go from the 4 first being chosen by merit and from different lineage, then suddenly it turns into a system of monarchy resulting in the succession of Guru Harkrishan Ji at such a young age who also passed away at a young age. A: "Nepotism" is defined as: The practice among those with power or influence of favoring relatives or friends, especially by giving them jobs. A lot of people like to accuse the Guru of being Nepotistic, and use it to bring down Sikhi by stating the successors of the Guru were not truly worthy of the title. The next Guru was never chosen on the basis of nepotism, and was always chosen based on Merit, the Guru tested each of his followers to see if they were worthy of the title of Guru. We are all just vessels filled with the same light, "family" is an illusion, we are all One. Although some of the Gurus did pass the Guruship on to their human sons, many did not, and even if they did, it was becuase their sons just happened to pass the test.If Sikhi allowed Nepotism, then why didnt Guru Nanak Dev Ji or many of the other Guru's pass it on to their children? Guru Nanak could have easily made Sri chand or Lakhmi Das the next Guru, the same applies with Guru Gobind Singh ji who did not have to let any of his sons sacrifice themselves for Sikhi, and could have asked them to not give Shaheedi. The fact that Guru Gobind Singh Ji established the Khalsa in 1699 before the death of all his human offsprings shows that he was going to stop the line of Human Guru's anyways. The ultimate argument against nepotism in Sikhi is the fact that the Siri Guru Granth Sahib Ji & the Khalsa Panth were made the eternal Guru. Hypothetically, even if the Guruship was passed down based solely on Nepotism, I would have no problem with it becuase it is the Guru's decision and looking back at history and how each Guru lives his life, I can say the Guru made the perfect decision. As for Guru Harkrishan Ji, the reason the Guru chose the vessel of a young boy was to show that spirituality isnt affected by age, and even a child can attain liberation. The reason Guru Harkrishan Ji physically passed away at such a young age was to exemplify shaheedi, it makes no sense for the Guru to go around curing other people of small pox, yet die from it himself. Q: why has Sikhi remained confined for the most part to the Punjabi population? A: Sikhs dont go out and actively convert people like people of Abrahamic theologies do, the Sikh community is also generally very young compared to others. This issue is already starting to change, there are already hubs of non-punjabi Sikhs thriving in places like America, Indonisia, UK, Canada, etc, and we just need time. Q: Why did/are some Sikhs converting to other religions, if Sikhi is supreme, then why would people leave it? A: The message itself is supreme, but the people themselves are not. The argument of people leaving/joining a certain religion can be made for any group. The larger abrehamic religions are the ones that generally have a higher turnover rate compared to easter Dharams. Q: why hasn’t history seen Gurus with a similar message in the West or other corners of the world? A: There are other people with similar messages, there's even some new relgion in the west called "Eckankar" which is very similar to Sikhi on certain aspects. Gurbani also contains Bani from a lot of people who lived before the physical arrival of Guru Nanak Dev Ji, who's Bani is inline with Gurmat. Q: Why is Gurbani repetitive? A: I dont know if your reading the english translation or something, but in Gurmukhi the way certain words are used has a different meaning depending on the context. Furthermore, Gurbani is also multilayered, and speaks to the mind during its different states. As for repetitiveness in message, it's important becuase Humans learn from repetition, when you were a child, your parents had to constantly call you by your name so you remember it, etc. Gurbani is not like the abrehamic texts, it is not divided by chapters, but rather by Music. Gurbani does not have dedicated sections for certain topics, becuase as a Sikh our job is not to pick and choose what we want to learn, the Guru teaches us what we need, and the format Gurbani is written in ensures its multi layered and speaks to different people at different stages in their spiritual journey. The fact that there are other Bhagats whose Bani is inline with the Guru, reinforces the Oneness of the message of Sikhi. Q: Why did the Gurus have multiple wives? At least with Islam there is a specific guidelines prescribed, a lot of Sikhs like to argue based on emotion rather than historical evidence. A: The narrative that the Gurus were polygamists is highly contestable on the basis of historical analysis, not emotion. "The story of Guru Har Rai having married seven wives, who were all sisters, is found only in one MS of Suraj Prakash and is written on unpaged leaves which are clearly an interpolation. Unfortunately this copy became the basis of the editions nowadays in vogue. Other copies mention only one marriage. Mahima Prakash, which is much older than this book, also mentions only one wife. See on this point the annotation of Bhai Vir Singh on Suraj Prakash" -Dr. Ganda Singh, Baba Teja Singh; 'A Short History of the Sikhs,' vol. i, pg. 48. Here is a good post discussing this issue As for Islam, providing specific guidelines, I hope you realize that it also provides guidelines to beat ones wife, among many other things... Q: Why so much debate over a simple matter of canon scriptures (the Dasam Granth which oddly enough contains 2 of the prayers forming the Nitnem) A: There isnt "so much" debate over this. the Anti-Dasam granth crowd is a vocal minority, and the Dasam Granth is accepted by the Khalsa Panth as a whole, and even backed by the Akal Takth. Furthermore, the Debate that does happen isnt about the nitnem banis from Dasam Granth (Jaap Sahib, Tav Prasad Savaiye, Chaupai Sahib). Overall, Sikhs have still preserved their scriptures far better than many others, and the Quran itself was never even written down by Muhammad, Jesus never wrote the Bible, etc... Q: Why is there such a controversy over vegetarianism vs meat eating? Why didnt the Guru lay our a clear guideline? A: This wasn't really an issue before the start of the modern day meat industry, but we as a community have turned it into an issue. Sikhs historically ate meat, this is a fact, the reason there is a big vegetarian movement in the Sikh community is mainly due to the modern day meat industry and the idea that Sikhs dont really need meat anymore becuase they have so many more alternatives. As for the actual theology regarding this issue, its already clearly laid out by the Guru: Sikhs are to refrain from Halal Meat, if a Sikhs is to hunt or eat meat, then they must follow the Jhatka Maryada set up by the Guru. More information and sources can be found at jhatkamaryada.com Q: Why are Sikhs encouraged to be critical thinkers, yet told not to ask questions? A: People are getting two concepts confused: its ok to question the Guru similar to how a student questions a teacher, however its discouraged to question for the sake of trying to create an arguement or disruption. Final Thoughts A deep underlying issue that motivates a lot of these arguments is the idea that if Sikhi is true, then why would it not also temporally reign supreme, and why would "bad things" happen to Sikhs if they are morally correct? The answer to this is the simply: Hukam, and the fact that "good" and "bad" dont really exist. However, the issue here is that others will see this as a cop out. I am interested in developing a more indepth response to this strain of thought. Any recommendations? Feedback If you have any suggestions, please let me know any way you can, you can also email me at TheTurbanatore@gmail.com or contact me via Reddit at reddit.com/u/TheTurbanatore
  5. TheeTurbanator

    Vaisakh: Sikhi vs Punjabism

    Waheguru Ji Ka Khalsa, Waheguru Ji Ki Fateh! A Basic Rundown of Vaisakhi Vaisakhi is a dharmic, and cultural festival which is celebrated on the 13th or 14th of April every year. For Sikhs, it commemorates the formation of Khalsa Panth, for Punjabi's it marks the beginning of the harvest season. The celebration of Vaisakhi predates Sikhi itself, however after the formalization of the Khalsa in 1699 it was mainly celebrated as a religious event for Sikhs. A lot of people might not realize this, but Guru Nanak Dev Ji was also born on Vaisakhi 1469 (Wikipedia is wrong), the same day Guru Gobind Singh Ji, the 10th Human form of Nanak, decided to lay down the formalization for the Khalsa Panth. This fact is often forgotten, but it amplifies the importance of Vaisakhi for Sikhs, as not just a celebration for the creation of the Khalsa, but also the day Guru Nanak Dev Ji was born. The Truth about Vaisakhi Vaisakhi used to be a Punjabi new years harvest festival, and was transformed by Guru Gobind Singh Ji to celebrate the creation of the Khalsa, but modern day Vaisakhi has mostly devolved from a celebration of the Khalsa back into a Punjabi festival. Vaisakhi for Sikhs isnt about Bhangra dancing, colorful cloths, or free food, it's about celebrating the creation of the Khalsa Panth. When I ask non-sikhs, and even some sikhs about Vaisakhi, they seem to be clueless as to why we celebrate it in the first place, and instead make it about free food or socializing with friends. We attend all these Nagar Kirtan parades and we eat food and meet friends, but at the end of the day we dont end up learning anything about Sikhi. Sadly, Vaisakhi also gets hijacked by corporations trying to promote their business, and Politicians trying to promote their party. This is bad becuase their are taking advantage of such an important occasion, however isn't that bad becuase these corporations and politicians also contribute a lot of funds to organizing Vaisakhi, help spread awareness, and participate in it themselves to attract even more people. I think we should find a way to limit them, if not cut them out completely. We are not responsible for promoting another culture at a Sikh event, especially when they are using Gurdwara money, on Gurdwara property, under the name of a Sikh event. Punjabi culture itself is often times anti Sikh as it promotes alcohol, sexism, caste system, etc. If we allow any of it, then we risk mixing it and passing it off as Sikhi to the rest of the world. This will create a lot of problems becuase people will be fed misinformation that will be the direct result of Sikhi being watered down by Punjabi culture. Now before you get triggered and start calling me a radical, fundamentalist, zealot, extremist or any of the buzzwords people like to use, just keep in mind that I am a freedom of speech and expression advocate, and I dont feel like we should outright ban Bhangra, Punjabi Music, or food. I definitely feel like their are a lot of people who come to Vaisakhi just for the food, music, dancing, etc, and to ban the aforementioned practices would cut off a lot of people who could be potentially educated on Sikhi. Instead of having a complete blanket Ban like some Sikhs propose, I think that we should try to somehow limit the Punjabi culture and push back hard and find a way to bring the focus on Vaisakhi back to Sikhi instead of Punjabi culture. Typical Punjabi "Counterarguments" When I bring up the issue of the Punjabiization of Vaisakhi, I often times hear the same pathetic counterarguments from Punjabis who try to defend the Punjabification of Vaisakhi. I will now address some of these common "counterarguments" that Punjabis bring up in defense of the current state of Vaisakhi. One common argument Punjabis like to bring up is "oh but most people who attend Vaisakhi are already Sikh, why do you have to promote relgion so much?", that might be true, but keep in mind that most people are only Sikh in name, and when confronted, they know very little about Sikhi, or just know misinformation. When I personally do parchaar and hand out the "3 Facts about Sikhi" leaflets at Vaisakhi, a lot of Punjabi "Sikhs" reject my lefts saying something along the lines of "were already Sikh,we know about Sikh-ism, just focus on the white people, not us", however when I ask them to explain the basic principles they fail miserably and then finally bend the knee and accept the leaflet. Another common argument is "oh but Vaisakhi existed before Sikhi, and was celebrated by farmers as a new year's/harvest festival, you can't just hijack it", it's true that Vaisakhi and was celebrated as a new year's/harvest festival prior to Sikhi, however Sikhs celebrate it becuase of the creation of the Khalsa, and that is what really popularized Vaisakhi, and is what it's known for today. How many people, especially Sikhs in the west, honestly celebrate Vaisakhi as a harvest festival? Most of us aren't even farmers, without Sikhi, Vaisakhi would be all but irrelevant in the modern age. If someone wants to celebrate Vaisakhi as a harvest festival, then they are free to do so and we aren't stopping them, however we as Sikhs must remember that we celebrate Vaisakhi as the creation of the Khalsa. Make Vaisakhi Great Again At the moment Vaisakhi is nothing more than a Punjabi festival with a Sikhi twist, we need to reverse that. I propose that we start by increasing all efforts to do parchar and educate the community on Sikhi. Vaisakhi attracts hundreds of thousands of people, all of whom have the potential to be educated. This is a golden opportunity that only comes once a year, and we as a Panth need to capitalize on it if we are to grow Sikhi. What better place and time to spread Sikhi than at a Nagar Kirtan during Vaisakhi time. It honestly says a lot about the Sikh community when very few "Sikhs" are educated on it, and even fewer are fully committed to the faith. I feel like we need to really focus on our community, and not sideline them in favor of non-sikhs, becuase at the end of the day these are the people who identify as Sikh and still practice some form of Sikhi, even tho it is a watered down, and heavily Punjabiized version. Punjabi culture is like a double edged sword, it promotes anti-sikh practices, however it also promotes pride & bravery to defend ones way of life. When things get serious, Punjabi's are often the first one to go fight on the frontlines. During 1984 many non Amritdhari Punjabis, who were otherwise never religious and would never wake up for Amritvela, joined the fight and died fighting in defense of Harmandir Sahib. The thing about Punjabi's is that they are always ready to die for the Panth, but aren't willing to live for the Panth. I feel like Punjabis have a place in the Sikh community becuase without them we wouldn't get very far. We need to take the good things about Punjabi culture and leave the bad, this is why I dont feel like Punjabis are a lost cause and are worth doing Parchaar to. What I propose is that we drastically increase our education efforts. This can be done in the form of educational events, school programs, university courses, and most importantly: street parchaar. We must also compare and contrast between Sikhi and Punjabism in order to separate them, and demonstrate Sikhi's obvious superiority. Instead of a straight up ban, I would suggest we specifically stop Music that contains anti Sikh themes that promote drugs, alcohol, degrading women, etc at Sikh associated events and Gurdwaras. If someone wants to go around blasting anti Sikh music then by all means go ahead, but not at a Sikh event. As for bhangra, although it does not represent Sikhi, if someone wants to dance to celebrate the creation of the Khalsa then I think it's fine. If we follow through with the aforementioned strategies, we can still keep the Punjabis happy, all while promoting Sikhi! My Question for the Community What would you improve or change for Vaisakhi to make it focus more on sikhi, rather than Punjabi culture? Please leave your suggestions down below. Resources Informative Leaflets RajoanaTV Exposing the Culturalization of Vaisakhi Nanak Naam on why Sikhs celebrate Vaisakhi, & its significance Basics of Sikhi on The Unique Khalsa Panth! Vaisakhi Katha
  6. .- Prabhjot Singh -.

    Punjabi Self-Study Books

    Waheguru Ji Ka Khalsa Waheguru Ji Ki Fateh Sangat Jeo A few books on learning written and spoken Punjabi have been uploaded on SikhSangat's Scribd account. Perhaps those of us who are not familiar with Gurmukhi script, or those who want to improve their Punjabi vocabulary and general reading skills will find these self-study books useful. :geek: Links: 1. Colloquial Panjabi - A Complete Language Course by Mangat Rai Bhardwaj - Published by Routledge, London (2004) From the Preface: "This course... is a complete language course which aims at helping you learn the colloquial variety of Panjabi... One of its major objectives is to help the learner take her/his linguistic skills to the level from where she or he is able to take charge of her/his own learning, become her/his own language teacher and attain higher levels without anybody's help. This course has been designed in such a way that you do not have to learn reading and writing at the same time as spoken Panjabi." Read/Download: http://www.scribd.co...at-Rai-Bhardwaj 2. Introduction to Punjabi Language - Unknown Author Read/Download: http://www.scribd.co...unjabi-Language 3. Punjabi Primer - Scientifically designed for easy learning by Dr. Gurbakhsh Singh - Published by The Kalidhar Trust, Gurdwara Baru Sahib, Himachal Pradesh, India From the Preface: "Younger people may find this very helpful for learning to read Gurmukhi. It is based on the conversion method of learning Punjabi. According to this method, one learns to convert the Punjabi alphabet and vowels into corresponding English forms, the use of which the student already knows. It, therefore, enables a person to read Panjabi in about two weeks time. Learning by this technique becomes interesting because one starts reading and writing words the very first day." Read/Download: http://www.scribd.co...Gurbakhsh-Singh 4. Punjabi Reader Level 1 by Ved P. Vatuk - Published by Colorado State University (1964) Description: "A first-level reader is presented, primarily for those students who have a speaking knowledge of Panjabi and some knowledge of Panjabi Grammar. This volume can be used in a general Panjabi language course as a supplement to conversational materials, or by itself in a course on the written language. A glossary and a brief Grammatical appendix have been added to make the reader self-sufficient. Three sections are in this volume -- the first section introduces the writing system, the second section presents selections of increasing difficulty, with vocabulary lists, explanations of Idioms, and exercises relevant to the materials read, the third section is more advanced and includes a one-act play for students wishing supplementary reading." Read/Download: http://www.scribd.co...University-1964 5. Punjabi Reader Level 2 by Ved P. Vatuk - Published by Colarado State University (1964) This is the second volume of the above book. Read/Download: http://www.scribd.co...University-1964 Dhanvaad! :happy2: :bl:
  7. Punjabi Music and Movie Industry is one of the biggest in India. Is it driven by motivation to distract and de-moralise Punjabi Sikhs similar to what is happening in Europe and North America?
  8. Guest

    Punjabi Cinema

    Why do a good majority of Punjabi movies promote caste when we as Sikhs ideologically are not supposed to be following the caste system? If the word "Jatt" isn't mentioned in a typical movie (which most likely it will) then at least the last names of all major characters are mentioned to indirectly denote their caste. I don't get why this agenda is pushed out by Punjabi Cinema and no one really speaks against it? Because it appeases the majority population and thus usage of this single word can make the film a cash cow? I don't mean to take jabs at anyone, as the only example I can use in context of Punjabi Cinema is Jatt promotion. But I guess the point of my question is; why is any type of caste promotion of any caste not looked down upon by mainstream Sikh Punjabis? Is there a solution to it?
  9. 94nsngh

    Punjabi Language

    I signed up to Sikh Sangat to simply find out where I can learn Punjabi. I would be grateful if someone could help point me in the right direction. I am a Sikh 24 years of age from the UK (Slough), and have been brought up in a household where English is the main language. My issue is I can just about speak and understand it, having this problem makes me feel very disconnected from the Sangat. I like to help people from my own community, but find it impossible at times due to a major language barrier. I know this is a common problem with many Sikh people I know, why is this issue not being addressed within our community? Thank you.
  10. Guest

    bindhi and haaha tips

    hey guys so i have learnted how to read in punjabi but sometimes haaha confuses me. sometimes it is said has **oh nd sometimes **uh. or **hu, **ho. why is this and i also find bindhi hard, it changes everytime and out of all of the things in punjabi i find bindhi hard, anytips? i cant find words in which i will be able to practise? can post here?
  11. After waiting ages to take a DNA test, I finally got around to it recently. The results were, for the most part, what I expected. Here's my estimate: Asia - 85.4% South Asian - 79.9% West Asian (Iran, Afghanistan, Iraq, Caucasus, Turkey) - 4.3% Central Asian (Afghanistan, Tajikistan, Turkmenistan, Uzbekistan, Kazahkstan) - 1.4% Europe - 14.6% North and West Europe Irish, Scottish, and Welsh - 11.6% Scandinavian - 3.0% Even though these are only estimates, they give an idea of my ethnicity in a broad sense. Nonetheless 14.6% is still considered a fairly large proportion in an estimate, and in all honesty was completely unexpected. My knowledge on DNA and genealogy are probably basic at best but from what I've read such a large percentage of the European could be traced back as early as the 5th or 6th generation before me! This estimate didn't really tell me much as I would have liked to know so I decided to use GEDmatch to get a more in-depth picture. The results were certainly interesting (Jagsaw Singh if you're still around I'm sure you'll be the most pleased). For the sake of the topic I'll mention that I'm Punjabi Jatt. This is what I found out: Baloch - 37.94% (The term Baloch is used here to loosely describe Persian origin) South Indian - 29.43% (South Indian here refers to indigenous or native Indian) NE-Euro - 11.70% (oddly the Baltic region) Caucasian - 11.30% (Armenia, Georgia, Azerbaijan - again part of the Greater Persian Empire) SW-Asian - 2.28% (ambiguously referring to Persian, Caucasian, and Arabian) Mediterranean - 2.25% (most likely Greek, Cypriot, Turkish) The rest is negligible. You are also given an approximation how closely you are linked and compare to the individual populations of the sampling done by the genealogists, here are the top ten from highest to lowest: 1) Punjabi-Jatt-Sikh 2) Punjabi-Jatt-Muslim 3) Punjabi-Khatri 4) Pushtikar-Brahmin 5) Kashmiri-Pandit 6) Punjabi 7) Kashmiri 8) Punjabi-Brahmin 9) Rajasthani-Brahmin 10) Singapore-Indian What do you think? I was surprised at some of the detail it went into and some of it was actually expected - I have always explained to people how we very likely had Persian and possibly some European ancestors. Although I probably won't, personally I would love to lay claim to my Persian heritage! Has anybody here taken a test? What labels, if any, do I use now...Persian Jatt I think the moral here is we shouldn't be so narrow-minded.
  12. JRoudh

    Punjabi Language

    Coming from certain Punjabi background which I am sure most people are aware of I have found that the Punjabi dialect we speak is slightly different from other Sikh communities in the UK. It is not worse or better but just a bit different. ie I find that our Punjabi is more similar to Punjabi spoken by Muslim Punjabis. However, I also find that Canadian/American Punjabi sounds more similar to what I speak then the UK Punjabis. What could be the reasons behind this? Could this just be the geographic locations in the Punjab. As most of the people from the community I come from, originate from Amritsar Lahore. Ambala areas. Could this also be the reason that Sikhs that come from the above areas tend to be more strict and conservative then Sikh from other areas. As these areas are more closer to where Sikhism originated.
  13. Guest

    Punjabi

    I really want to teach myself to read write and speak punjabi, but I really dont know where to start. I know they teach it at the gurdwara but im 25 already and i feel a little embaresed to go and sit with children and try and learn my own language which i should already know.
  14. Guest

    Conversion to Sikhi ?!

    Is conversion to Sikhi welcome ? I wasn't born in India (we only go there once every three years to meet relatives) so I can't really read the Gurmukhi script or any proper punjabi script....... My parents took me to a gurudwara regularly as the closest temple was too far, and my hindi was weak so I didn't want to go there anyway. I'm aged 16 - 20 if that matters.
  15. What might come as shock to sikh / punjabi wedding , a woman is seen with her turbaned groom husband , in only sweat shorts. On top she's wearing the usual choli , dupatta, but the lehenga is missing !! lol http://blogs.timesofindia.indiatimes.com/everything-social/this-brides-wedding-ensemble-manages-to-set-twitter-on-fire/?utm_source=facebook.com&utm_medium=referral&utm_campaign=TOI KI JALOOS KADYA !
  16. 5akaalsingh

    The Punjabi Wedding Breakdown

    this is very true lol
  17. http://singhstation.net/2017/06/census-2016-punjabi-fastest-growing-language-in-australia/ Its official – Punjabi is the fastest growing language in Australia. The 2016 Census has revealed that Punjabi is the fastest growing language in Australia, showing an increase from 71229 people in 2011 to 132 496 people in 2016. Earlier, Punjabi was also the fastest growing language, showing a 207.5 per cent increase from 23,164 people in 2006 to 71,229 people in 2011.
  18. Is there an app that allow me to translation Punjabi speech to English? I want to know because I want to translate Punjabi language videos into English; a person says a word in Punjabi and the app says the translation in English
  19. ਵਾਹਿਗੁਰੂ ਜੀ ਕਾ ਖ਼ਾਲਸਾ ਵਾਹਿਗੁਰੂ ਜੀ ਕੀ ਫ਼ਤਹਿ Punjabi Spelling for Android has been released on the Google Play store. Its free and has no ads. It helps build associations and encourages word and sound formations. It uses simple images, sounds and text to provide an easy and learning experience, intended to keep young kids immersed in the learning experience. With 2,300 variations of words presented around a core set of words presented in the quizzes, the concepts will get reinforced, and all the presented options are also randomized ... so much for memorization, its time to use word formation skills! Help make our tools better! Spread the word! Learn Punjabi! Participate! And did we mention, the tools are FREE! Links ... Amrit Punjabi Website : http://www.amritpunjabi.com Punjabi Spelling : https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.amritpunjabi.punjabispelling Punjabi Worksheets : http://www.amritpunjabi.com/punjabi-worksheets/punjabi-worksheets-words.aspx ਧੰਨਵਾਦ
  20. Hello everyone, So earlier this year my parents found a girl for me who I might marry. I am from the United States and she is from India. Her family is Gursikh and I talk to them frequently on the phone. She told me that they wished my Punjabi was better because I have trouble speaking it (pronunciation and such). So then I taught myself to read and write in Gurmukhi. However, I am still having difficulty speaking it. How can I improve my speaking skills? Since I taught myself to read and write in Punjabi, I decided to read Gurbani. I read very slow and have difficulty pronouncing some of the words, which is not a problem. However, I want to understand what our Gurus want to tell us. I do not want to read English translations because I feel as if it might take away from what the Gurus originally want us to know. Thank you
  21. Where can I translate Punjabi words written in Roman Script?
  22. I know basic punjabi but it is broken but i want to learn pure punjabi , i dont have an accent while speaking punjabi but i dont know how to put it all together and dont have enough vocab, is there any books that i can learn to understand and speak pure punjabi
  23. I always thought my Punjabi speaking skills weren't that good because I was born and raised in the United States. However, over the years I have made friends with a lot of people who are Punjabi and they speak Punjabi very well even though they were also born in the United States just like me. Since then I have always wondered: Why is my Punjabi not so good? My parents were both born in Punjab, India and raised there until they migrated here. As a child, I always spoke to them in Punjabi, but I was raised around a lot of Hispanics and White people. Fast-forward to now, I am 23 years old and I speak in Punjabi at home so I can practice. However, my pronunciation is still very bad as well as my vocabulary and sentence structure. I know I can speak with my friends but they all make fun of me when I try to speak with them in Punjabi. They can understand me, but they stay I speak it very funny and "white-washed". It gets really sad when I'm at the Gurdwara doing sewa or at a wedding with elders and people try to make conversation with me in Punjabi and I try my best but then they realize that my Punjabi isn't very good, so they are forced to speak in English to me because of that. What should I do to change this? So far I only speak to my parents and grandfather in Punjabi. Are there any books or videos or anything that can help me learn and make my Punjabi-speaking skills better? Thank you Mr_C
  24. It's quite sad to see the condition of these guys, they should go back to Punjab and live life with dignity. The British Punjabi community does not want them there nor cares for them as they usually have have mental health and drunken anti social behavioural problems.
  25. tasha9870

    Help Needed.

    Sat Sri Akal This may not be to do with the Sikh religion but... I'm in desperate need of learning Punjabi and Bhangra dance. I live in New Zealand have a Punjabi boyfriend and soon will be visiting India. Please any help what so ever would be highly appreciated. Thank you.
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