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which Janam Sakhi is considered most authentic?


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Puratan Janamsakhi is the most contemporary and probably authentic. It was written in the early 1600s making to a very reliable source. Bahi Vir Singh writes it is the oldest janamsakhi though he goes with a mid 1600s date of Guru Hargobinds time.


He says the Hindalias have made their own corrupt version of the janamsakhi. He also says that Bhai Bala Wala Janamsakhi is a copy of this while changing parts to fit the agenda of the author who Bhai Vir Singh believes to be the Hindalias.

Bhai Vir Singh believe that Sakhis of this Janamsakhi were each written at different times. The third sakhi is written a while after the Mughals while Sakhis about Guru Arjan Dev Jis shabads were, by the language, written during Guru Hargobind Jis time. Another Sakhis appears to be of Guru Gobind Singhs time.

The language is south western Punjabi and it does not seem the writer is a professional nor an expert. There are many errors that seem to be copying mistakes.

The first Sakhi says Guru Nanak was born in the month of Vaisakh in the third period of the moonlight night. I.e amrit vela. It interestingly says that by the time he was 5 Hindus and Muslims started to consider him and avatar or a saint.

There is a lot of Gurbani used in this Janamsakhi. The author makes the mistake of attributing Saloks of the fifth Guru to Guru Nanak.

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Below I will post some pictures from the Janamsakhi

First image is Guru Nanak with Bhai Bala (Proving he at least existed) and Bhai Mariana dating to 1785

Second image is Guru Nanak with Bhai Bala dated to 1790-1820 

Third image is Guru Nanak in Mecca from the Late 18th century 

Fourth is Guru Nanak as a shopkeeper from the late 19th century

Final image is Guru Nanak with a Brahmin from the early 18th century

Imtresting how in the earlier images Guru Nanak looks like a Peer or more of a Muslim Saint while in the later ones he look more like a Hindu Saint and even royalty.

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16 hours ago, Arsh1469 said:

Hope the sangat enjoys this.

@dalsingh101

i would be very interested in your opinion on the puratan janamsakhi.

I'm loving those images bro! Especially the second one. Also loving the detail of dress of Bhai Mardana ji in the Mecca one.

When you say puratan janamsakhis, do you mean any specific one or in general?  

 

 

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6 hours ago, dallysingh101 said:

I'm loving those images bro! Especially the second one. Also loving the detail of dress of Bhai Mardana ji in the Mecca one.

When you say puratan janamsakhis, do you mean any specific one or in general?  

 

 

Yes it is one Janamsakhi which is called Puratan Janamsakhi. It is also known as the Macauliffe-wale Janam Sakhi

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3 hours ago, Arsh1469 said:

Yes it is one Janamsakhi which is called Puratan Janamsakhi. It is also known as the Macauliffe-wale Janam Sakhi

Are you sure you aren't talking about the Colebrook Janamsakhi? 

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3 hours ago, dallysingh101 said:

Are you sure you aren't talking about the Colebrook Janamsakhi? 

That is a copy of the Puratan Janamsakhi. I think it was the first one or one of the first copies of the Janamsakhi to be found

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8 hours ago, Arsh1469 said:

That is a copy of the Puratan Janamsakhi. I think it was the first one or one of the first copies of the Janamsakhi to be found

I think the second post on this thread by N30S1NGH perfectly articulates my perspective of them. You can read that instead of me repeating bro.   

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