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1984 Sikh Genocide Delhi Protests : Latest Update & Analysis : Post your views please.


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Got the latest update in evening from Delhi and just now got some recent update on Sikh Channel -

  • DSGMC (Akali Dal) members protested in front of Sonia Gandhi house, they were able to break 2 barricades and reach quite close, their motive was to hand over a memorandum to Sonia Gandhi and to let their voice heard by deaf Govt. (WHY THEY PROTESTED IN FRONT OF SONIA GANDHI HOUSE IS NOT VERY CLEAR TO ME, WHAT PURPOSE COULD IT SOLVE, BUT THEY ARE LOCAL SIKHS AND KNOW THE POLITICAL SITUATION MUCH BETTER).
  • WHEN MR. BHOGAL ONE OF THE DSGMC MEMBERS WERE PROTESTING IN TUGHLAKABAD AREA OF DELHI, THE POLICE INSPECTOR OF THAT AREA JASWANT RAI CAME OUTSIDE, TOOK OUT HIS REVOLVER AND POINTED OUT AT MR. BHOGAL, SAYING IF ANYBODY RAISES ANY SLOGAN "NAARA" AGAINST MR. SAJJAN KUMAR, HE WILL SHOT HIM DOWN WITH HIS REVOLVER. HEARING THIS, THE WHOLE SANGAT GOT VERY ANGRY AND TEARED CONGRESS(I) POSTERS etc.
  • AT THIS MOMENT OF TIME, MANJEET SINGH GK, MANJINDER SINGH SIRSA ALL ARE PROBABLY ARRESTED, AND CONGRESS (I) IS TRYING LEVEL BEST TO SUPRESS THE MOVEMENT.

ANALYSIS

THE ABOVE WAS UPDATE, I APPRECIATE AND SALUTE EFFORTS BY MANJEET SINGH GK AND THE WHOLE DSGMC, THIS HAS NEVER BEEN DONE BY PARAMJEET SINGH SARNA, WHO HAS BEEN AN AGENT OF CONGRESS(I) AND INDIAN GOVERNMENT. PARAMJEET SINGH SARNA RUNS A STEEL MANUFACTURING COMPANY, PUNJAB STEEL, AND GETS HUGE CONTRACTS WORTH CRORES FROM CONGRESS(I), HENCE SAJJAN KUMAR, TYTLER AND SHIELA DIXIT ARE HIS FRIENDS.

THE INTERESTING THING TO WATCH WOULD BE IF THE CURRENT PROTESTS BY CURRENT DSGMC COMMITTEE (WHOSE GOD FATHERS ARE AKALI-DAL (BADAL) GROUP AND AS WE ALL KNOW AKALI-DAL (BADAL) IS AN AGENT OF BJP AND RSS), ARE A PART OF AN OVERALL POLITICS, AS THERE ARE GENERAL ELECTIONS IN INDIA NEXT YEAR-2014, AND THE CURRENT PROTESTS BY SIKHS IN DELHI WILL LEAD TO A COMPLETE LOSS OF SIKH-VOTE-BANK FOR CONGRESS(I) AND MIGHT ALSO LEAD TO A SIGNIFICANT LOSS OF HINDU-VOTE-BANK FOR CONGRESS(I), AS THERE ARE OTHER ISSUES SUCH AS LOKPAL-BILL etc., AND AFTER THAT WHO CARES FOR JUSTICE???

BJP AND AKALI-DAL (BADAL) WERE IN CENTRE FOR 8 YEARS WITH ATAL BIHARI VAJPAYEE AS P.M., WHAT CLOSURE THEY BROUGHT TO 1984-SIKH-GENOCIDE, i believe DSGMC WAS ALSO RUN BY THE SAME PARTY AT THAT TIME AVTAR SINGH HIT.

WHAT IS HAPPENING IN DELHI IS NOTHING NEW, GADDAR-E-KAUM PRAKASH SINGH BADAL WAS THE PERSON WHO BURNED AND TEARED INDIAN CONSTITUION COPY, WAS WITH SANT JI, AND THEN THIS GADDAR WROTE THE LETTER TO INDIRA GANDHI, AND CAME OUTSIDE HARMIMANDIR SAHIB COMPLEX WITH HIS HANDS-UP, THUS EARNING THE TITLE "GADDAR-E-KAUM".

I APPRECIATE DELHI PROTESTS, BUT ARE THEY SERIOUS FOR GETTING SOME JUSTICE, OR BJP/RSS GOD-FATHERS PLANS ARE WASTING SIKHS ENERGY FOR THEIR OWN USE??? I DON'T KNOW ANSWERS TO THESE QUESTIONS, HENCE THESE ARE STILL QUESTIONS TO ME ...

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badal is just abiding his time till his dies a natural death he is a spent force. He wont do nothing for the Sikhs which threatens his raj, and that is exactly what will threaten his raj the irony.

His son on the also often talks about punjabiyat and communal harmony for all communities neglecting his core vote bank of Sikhs and what his akali party was founded for. He is trying to be diplomatic as he has to beg congress and other hindu's in central govt for all the help and resources for punjab but also he knows he cant get elected or get things done if he ignores his Sikh vote bank.

We have to remember the indian terrorist war of 1980s against the Sikh was a war waged to decrease the number of Sikhs so they cant have enough power politically. The akali's got a harsh lesson so now they tread carefully but foolishly rather than tolerating hindu extremists in punjab and congress they should have hounded them out at all costs.

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HT Correspondent, Hindustan Times

New Delhi: , May 03, 2013

Delhi Sikhs have protested in large numbers for the first time since 1984. Credit goes to them.

Sikhs continue protests, lay siege to 10 Janpath

A day after they interrupted Metro services for over half an hour, Sikh groups on Thursday protested outside Congress chief Sonia Gandhi’s official 10 Janpath residence and the party office at 24 Akbar Road against the acquittal of Congress leader Sajjan Kumar in an 1984 anti-Sikh riot case.

Around one thousand Sikh protesters in different groups, led by senior Sikh leaders, thronged the arterial roads leading towards Congress president’s residence and party office with placards around 11 am. http://www.hindustantimes.com/Images/Popup/2013/5/03-05-13-pg-02b.jpg

The protesters, including women, were divided into two groups and marched toward the two destinations shouting slogans against the government and demanding justice for riot victims.

The first group marched towards Sonia Gandhi’s residence from the Kapurthala House side while another marched towards party office from the Akbar Road- Mansingh Road intersection. The agitators jostled with police personnel deployed on security duty and tried to break police barricades. As Delhi Police had imposed prohibitory orders under section 144 of CrPC in Delhi’s Lutyens’ Zone, several senior Delhi police officers were seen requesting protestors to shift their protests to Jantar Mantar. But the protesters ignored the warnings and some of them clashed with security personnel when they were prevented from burning effigies of Sonia Gandhi, Prime Minister Manmohan Singh and Sajjan Kumar. The protesters eventually managed to burn the effigies outside Sonia Gandhi’s residence as well as the party office. When they sat on the road and refused to move, the police detained 115 protesters and took them to the Tughlaq Road and the Parliament Street police stations. The detained protesters include Delhi Sikh Gurudwara Management Committee (DSGMC) chairperson Manjeet Singh GK and its general secretary Manjinder Singh Sirsa.

All of them were let off in less than an hour. Police said two DTC buses were damaged. Arterial roads such as Akbar Road, Motilal Nehru Marg, Krishna Menon Marg, Mansingh Road, Maulana Azad Road and Janpath in New Delhi area were temporarily closed due to the protests. “Necessary action would be taken against the protesters as they violated prohibitory orders imposed in the area,” a senior police officer said, adding the protests continued till 1 pm. After the protest, the crowd organised a “langar” (community meal) outside the Congress office.

Talking to Hindustan Times, Sirsa alleged that an inspector at the Tughlaq Road police station misbehaved with Siromani Akali Dal leader Kuldeep Singh Bhogal and threatened to shoot him with his service gun when Bhogal shouted slogans against Sajjan Kumar.

http://www.hindustantimes.com/StoryPage/Print/1053958.aspx

© Copyright © 2013 HT Media Limited. All Rights Reserved.

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Aam Aadmi Party (AAP) leaders, including Arvind Kejriwal, Manish Sisodia, Gopal Rai, Sanjay Singh and Kumar Vishwas will sit on a one-day fast in New Delhi along with the family members of the the 1984 anti-Sikh riots' victims, on Friday as a protest against the acquittal of Congress leader Sajjan Kumar.

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HT Correspondent, Hindustan Times

New Delhi, May 04, 2013

First Published: 01:47 IST(4/5/2013)

Last Updated: 01:49 IST(4/5/2013)

Power play at Sikh protest, Vijender Gupta booed away

The anti-Sikh riot victims’ protest and indefinite fast demanding justice turned political with BJP leader Vijender Gupta being booed away by Aam Aadmi Party (AAP) volunteers at Jantar Mantar on Friday. Nirpreet Kaur, who lost her father during the 1984 riots, embarked on an indefinite fast to ensure justice for the victims. AAP leaders, including Arvind Kejriwal had joined the protest for a day to express their solidarity.

The fast is the outcome of Congress leader Sajjan Kumar’s acquittal by a Delhi court on April 30 in an anti-Sikh riot case, triggering widespread anger across Delhi’s Sikh community.

The protest started at 11am and saw a series of short speeches, all underscoring the need for unity in their fight for justice. Recalling the loss of near and dear ones, several victims and survivors narrated their horrific experiences during the 1984 riots.

Flashing a copy of the chargesheet, Kejriwal read out the last lines. “It is not only the Sikhs in Delhi who have bore the brunt of the riots. Muslims were massacred in Gujarat and Hindus were killed in Kashmir. First the British divided us and now the politicians have divided us for their vote bank. Now is the time for being united to fight injustice.”

But the otherwise apolitical platform and serene protest was marred by a “political tussle” involving AAP supporters and BJP. Barely few minutes after Gupta reached the venue and sat on the dais, few of the young AAP volunteers and supporters objected to his presence and booed him. After both Gupta and Kejriwal tried to pacify the situation, they left the dais and sat down in front of the dais along with others. Gupta left soon after.

“There could have been BJP and AAP workers clash but I thought, the cause is important, other issues are secondary. We would be joining them on Sunday too,” Gupta told HT later.

Nirpreet Kaur’s demands include: Filing of the charge sheet related to FIR 67/87 and constitution of a Special Investigation Team (SIT) in the case to investigate it independently.

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Not only have many rich and powerful Sikhs ignorned the Sikh Genocide victims but also mots of India.

Opinion » Op-Ed

Published: May 3, 2013 01:33 IST | Updated: May 3, 2013 02:02 IST

A community does some soul- searching on 1984 cases

Chander Suta Dogra

A protest at a Metro station in New Delhi. Photo: Shiv Kumar Pushpakar

Repeated setbacks in the search for justice are prompting questions about poor support for riot victims

With the recent acquittal of Sajjan Kumar by a Delhi court which sent a wave of dismay among Sikhs in Punjab and across the world, the realisation has started to grow that the Sikh community as a whole, barring a few exceptions, has done little to lend a helping hand to those seeking justice for the 1984 riots.

The anger and frustration at repeated setbacks in courts is no less than the sense of collective shame that is beginning to pervade sections of the community at not being able to bring the key perpetrators to book. This is partly why the demand to reopen and investigate afresh the hundreds of cases that were closed due to lack of evidence is gaining resonance.

Until 2007, when the Central Bureau of Investigation filed the first closure report in a case against Jagdish Tytler stating that it could not contact any of the witnesses, the complainants were mostly fighting the cases on their own with very little resources or support. It is well known that many key witnesses were either purchased or coerced into giving contrived testimonies, often changing what they said, contributing to the perception in the courts that their statements were unreliable.

On Tuesday, when District and Sessions judge J.R. Aryan acquitted Sajjan Kumar, he did so on the ground that the prosecution’s star witness, Jagdish Kaur, had not named him in her statement before the Justice Ranganath Mishra Commission in 1985.

Locating witnesses

The 2007 setback in Tytler’s case however proved to be a watershed in the legal battles of the 1984 riot victims. For the first time it drew the attention of a group of U.S.-based Sikh lawyers to what was happening here. Gurpatwant Singh Pannun, a New York-based attorney, who later formed the Sikhs for Justice (SFJ), helped trace Jasbir Singh in the U.S, one of the witnesses who the CBI said could not be traced.

Another witness, Surinder Singh, who had resiled from his previous statement before the Nanavati Commission, was also located and persuaded to depose again. The CBI sent a team to the U.S. to record their statements, but later told the court that they could not be relied upon because of inconsistencies. Similarly, 17 other witnesses were located by the combined efforts of the SFJ, H.S. Phoolka, the Delhi-based lawyer who has taken up the cases of the riot victims, and Navkiran Singh, a Chandigarh-based human rights lawyer.

It took an appeal by the SFJ for the Shiromani Gurudwara Parbandhak Committee (SGPC) to offer protection for these witnesses. Surinder Singh who had served as a granthi in several Delhi gurdwaras (he died a couple of years ago), told this correspondent in 2008 that for years, he had lived in fear of goons who used to harass him for implicating Tytler. In 2008, after the CBI recorded his statement afresh on the killing of three Sikhs outside Gurudwara Pul Bangash on November 1, 1984, he was a terrified man, unwilling to return to Delhi and take up his old job.

Playing politics

Today, the overwhelming sentiment in Punjab is that in the face of a hostile Congress, it was the responsibility of the Sikh political and religious leadership to motivate and help the victims firm up the cases. “This was never done. They always played politics with the issue. If it was the pro-Congress Sarna brothers heading the Delhi Sikh Gurudwara Committee who sided with the Congress and openly intimidated the witnesses, in Punjab, the Akalis only paid lip service because the Delhi Sikhs who suffered the most were not its vote bank,” says Gurpreet Singh of the International Sikh Confederation, an umbrella organisation of Sikh religious and social groups.

It was the small group of Mr. Phoolka, Navkiran Singh and the SFJ that brought to light as late as 2011 the deaths of 51 Sikhs in Haryana during the riots, including the destruction of the village of Hondh Chillar. A fact finding committee of the SFJ found that an FIR registered by the sarpanch after 23 Sikhs of the village were killed and their houses burnt down was never investigated properly. Through an RTI query, they also discovered that there was violence in nine out of Haryana’s 19 districts. Trials were being conducted in only 36 of the 65 cases registered while 29 cases had been cancelled. The activists then moved the Punjab and Haryana High Court and have succeeded in getting a commission of inquiry appointed into the killings in Haryana.

Says Navkiran Singh: “It is unfortunate that the biggest setback to the victims has been the apathy of the Sikh community itself. The well-off Sikhs in Delhi joined hands with the Congress to feather their nests and left the poorer victims to fend for themselves.”

He quotes the example of Badal Singh, who died in the rioting for which Jagdish Tytler was booked. “Badal Singh had run into the house of a rich Sikh to seek shelter, from where he was seized by the mob. That Sikh refused to become a witness.”

About compensation

“Unlike the Sikhs in Punjab, who stood up against injustice and ensured that perpetrators of human rights violations during terrorism were convicted, nothing of the sort happened with the Sikhs of Delhi. The debate among this section even today is centred around getting compensation and not about getting the accused convicted,” he says.

For the first time, Navikran managed to obtain, again through the RTI, the status of 740 odd cases registered in Delhi in the days after the riots. He discovered that 324 cases had been closed as ‘untraced’; 403 were eventually sent for trial of which 335 ended in acquittal. The fate of 13 is unclear. Just a handful of cases now remain in the courts. Says Mr. Phoolka, “An SIT should be constituted to reopen the untraced cases, where enquiries were never done.”

The SFJ meanwhile is keeping up the pressure on Union Minister Kamal Nath and filed a criminal case against him in New York. It was dismissed last year, but it filed another one in Switzerland when Mr. Nath went to Davos in January. The SFJ ensures that his trips abroad are greeted with protests by Sikhs. The recent convictions of BJP leaders guilty in the Gujarat riots has given hope to Sikh organisations that even after almost three decades they may still be able to get justice.

As Navkiran Singh says, “If this had happened to the Sikhs in Punjab, they would have got justice by now. Though belated, even now if the community leaders raise the pitch and press for an SIT, we might be able to fix a few of the guilty.”

chander.dogra@thehindu.co.in

Keywords: Congress leader Sajjan Kumar, Anti-Sikh riots trial, Indira Gandhi assassination, 1984 Anti-Sikh riots, Sajjan Kumar acquittal, Jagdish Tytler, Sikh community

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The British designed the system so well that its puppets would fight each other while they ruled over them, the same system is in place right now where these so called sikh leaders like badal and others play for the punjab Sikh vote when it comes to the elections but then totally ignore them afterwards. This is the big failure of the democratic system especially the indian one. It shows the views of the electorate are not heard instead they are marginalised once the politican is in power.

If there is going to be any hope for India Union it must break away from these vote bank politics or it is better it breaks up into separate countries

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    • Well you can't knock anyone out apparently. Lol. 
    • Same could be said for your original post. 
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