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An article exploring the true genesis of the Sikh Warrior-Saint ideal. To quote the hypothesis:

'A creature of classic Indic thought, it was hard for Tagore to comprehend that in Nanakian philosophy spiritual freedom naturally leads to political liberty. The Guru criticized the Siddhs, of Tantric Buddhism, for acquiring some spiritual gains but not utilizing them for the betterment of society at large. (6) It is evident, however, that even centuries after the Guru’s edicts were in circulation the odium attached to force and politics were still in power and men like Tagore were their blind prey. What was Guru Nanak Dev Ji’s perspective on force and it’s utilization? In order to truly understand this query, and subsequently manifest an answer, we will approach it from several various directions.'

To read more, visit:

https://tisarpanthdotcom.wordpress.com/2016/02/09/the-warrior-who-was-nanak/

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I already believe he was a Siphai; all I said was this article doesn't prove it.

I read the article and I don't believe it intends to use warrior in the literal sense of the word, but the metaphorical.

Still, it is very probable that Guru Nanak Dev must have had knowledge of shastar vidya. Considering the great extent of his Udaasis, and the profusion of bandits and dangerous animals in the medieval world, Guru Sahib must have been capable of defending themselves.

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Guest Jacfsing2

I read the article and I don't believe it intends to use warrior in the literal sense of the word, but the metaphorical. Still, it is very probable that Guru Nanak Dev must have had knowledge of shastar vidya. Considering the great extent of his Udaasis, and the profusion of bandits and dangerous animals in the medieval world, Guru Sahib must have been capable of defending themselves.

I think we can know that because Dhan Dhan Sri Guru Nanak Dev Ji was the one who taught Baba Buddha Ji how to use Shastar.
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I read the article and I don't believe it intends to use warrior in the literal sense of the word, but the metaphorical.

Still, it is very probable that Guru Nanak Dev must have had knowledge of shastar vidya. Considering the great extent of his Udaasis, and the profusion of bandits and dangerous animals in the medieval world, Guru Sahib must have been capable of defending themselves.

The premises is established in the article itself:

'The image of Akali Guru Nanak Dev Ji was one such (Sikh) fundamental which underwent a radical variation. Gone was the patriarchal figure of a silent, sublime socio-political spiritualist. In it’s stead was born an itinerant, pacifist and reclusive Guru. Doubtless, a dichotomy was soon born between what was perceived as being the Guru’s version of Sikhi, and that of his successors.'

'What was Guru Nanak Dev Ji’s perspective on force and it’s utilization? In order to truly understand this query, and subsequently manifest an answer, we will approach it from several various directions.'

I already believe he was a Siphai; all I said was this article doesn't prove it.

The article argues from an ideological perspective.

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