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Found 31 results

  1. Guest

    media brainwashing

    Here's a list of media brainwashing, in western countries, to make people aware of it and so wake up (and become immune to it), feel free to add your own observations: 1. to view all women (even young women/girls) as sex objects. from a young age the media tries to put the idea in males heads that any female should be sized up for sexual attractiveness 2. for all women to view themselves are sex objects. girls are taught from a young age that what others think of them and how much attention they get is a 'measure' of their 'worth'. any woman who does not want to put excessive attention into her gender or sexuality is seen as an antisocial freak. e.g. you can see how business wear sold to women is more based on 'looking pretty' than practicality. 3. that black guys are attractive/virile/masculine- i don't know if this is because the white media feels sorry for them or else white- guilt, but this is another idea that is pure media fabrication. i find it a little odd that 3/4 adverts on English tv depict white-woman/black-male couples. if someone is going to say that blacks have larger anatomy well then even if that was true, it would still be 1. black 2. attached to a black guy. so are you attracted to a person or a part of their bodies? 3. that wouldn't correlate to virility anymore than being tall would mean that someone would 'enjoy' sunbathing more. 4. that having an extra-marital affair is benign/ desirable/ prestigious /normal. to lust after a married person shows a severe lack of sense, and likewise for a married person to cheat on their own partner implies a clear lack of ethics. there is nothing 'sexy' about stabbing someone in the back, betraying someone's trust. you should think about the kind of character who would cheat on their spouse, and why then wouldn't they cheat on you? do you think you are someone so wonderful that they couldn't resist? the truth is they probably have insecurities, as do you for chasing a married person in the first place. 5. that being a 'virgin' is wrong/ to be looked down on or as a freak. firstly, virgins shouldn't have to label themselves or announce themselves as such, or else ' normal well adjusted well brought up person' would be a better title. maybe non-married non-virgins should be the ones who label themselves- as trash, antisocial, degenerate etc. (does not apply to rape victims, people genuinely taken advantage of and people who grew up in an environment where they were genuinely too stupid to know better). 6. that the sex depicted on tv, in films, in music is accurate. again false. most artists/actors are gays /lesbians, acting out an exaggerated scene written by poor writers, in front of a film crew.
  2. Guest

    Our sikh youth

    WGJKK WGJKF Whilst going through college and university, I have noticed a huge divide in our Sikh youth. I've seen many young Sikh men either go full cultural or full Sikhi. Women on the other hand, I rarely see any that truly follow Sikhi. I know one woman, 21 now who is dating an amrit shuk man in his 20s. She got personal and told me that they've had intimate relations and that it only took 4 days of them speaking for her to give him that intimacy (intercourse.. ). And she really shows interest in Sikhi but didn't truly see how wrong this was. And for the man, he said he was forced to shuk amrit, so that's pretty bad in itself as he has had various gfs and other stuff whilst amritdhari. Now if this woman is someone who goes gurdwara every weekend and shows genuine interest in Sikhi but still does panga like this, I am losing faith in humanity. The rest of the sikh women that i have met in my life, 95% of them are fully cultural with a drinking, clubbing and sexual lifestyle. Smoking, getting many tattoo's etc. Why aren't women going towards sikhi? Many men that I've met, although there's a lot of messed ones out there, I've met quite a few that took deep steps towards guruji and sikhi. Can't say the same about women. What can be done as a Panth? A lot of women don't even care or have any respect if you point things out like them posting stuff like smoking weed but having a khanda in their bio. Etc.
  3. Guest

    Women in sikh youth

    WGJKK WGJKF Whilst going through college and university, I have noticed a huge divide in our Sikh youth. I've seen many young Sikh men either go full cultural or full Sikhi. Women on the other hand, I rarely see any that truly follow Sikhi. I know one woman, 21 now who is dating an amrit shuk man in his 20s. She got personal and told me that they've had intimate relations and that it only took 4 days of them speaking for her to give him that intimacy (intercourse.. ). And she really shows interest in Sikhi but didn't truly see how wrong this was. And for the man, he said he was forced to shuk amrit, so that's pretty bad in itself as he has had various gfs and other stuff whilst amritdhari. Now if this woman is someone who goes gurdwara every weekend and shows genuine interest in Sikhi but still does panga like this, I am losing faith in humanity. The rest of the sikh women that i have met in my life, 95% of them are fully cultural with a drinking, clubbing and sexual lifestyle. Smoking, getting many tattoo's etc. Why aren't women going towards sikhi? Many men that I've met, although there's a lot of messed ones out there, I've met quite a few that took deep steps towards guruji and sikhi. Can't say the same about women. What can be done as a Panth? A lot of women don't even care or have any respect if you point things out like them posting stuff like smoking weed but having a khanda in their bio. Etc.
  4. Modern-day sikhs/singhs aren't warriors, which is a shame. Most of the actual sikhs in Canada especially are soft as they come, they don't exercise, know how to fight, or stand their ground, instead they're pushovers, and I'm talking about the Sikhs who were born and raised in Canada they're either fat or really skinny with no muscle allowing them to become targets of bullying and crime, not only that they also lack confidence which is something every singh needs, as they should be brave and stand up for others. We need to start making sikh youth work out from a early age and get them on a diet, make them work out and take fighting classes, it's not even just the youth, some adults are also lacking muscle and strength. How are you expected to defend your faith and the people around you, if you aren't built to do so? They carry kirpans but can't even use them properly lol. It's kinda ironic considering how the non-sikh punjabi people (the fakes) are the ones with the "lion courage"
  5. i am 18 years old, pursuing computer engineering in a well reputed college in mumbai. i have always had cool friends and supporting parents. but, i've never been a staunch believer in religion. i always find religion to be pointless, following what some person(s) said/wrote hundreds or thousands or years ago and having to follow their rules and the way they want us to lead our lives just doesn't seem right to me at all. i've been smoking weed since a year, and quite regularly. my grades are not affected by,and i've not been as irritable i was since a long time. i never intended to let my parents know about me smoking pot, but nowadays the paranoia associated with weed is taking over the better of me sometimes because of the guilt i feel hiding it from my parents. i have many friends who smoke weed and all of them are really nice people, so why should what i do in my personal life be associated with my morality?i really feel smoking weed isn't bad for me but i don't wanna live in hiding from my parents.i am a turbaned sikh and my parents are really good role models, just that i do not believe in the same things as me. is there any way i can come off to them and tell them about me smoking the jane?
  6. Now that I am in the last of my 20's am already reflecting back on everything from my highlights to low lights. Unfortunately my Jeevan as a Sikh is in the low light. At 19 I thought "With Guru's grace I can reach a sant level by the time am 30!" YES it can happen before another year's up. I even thought I be married and a father before 30! But nah. Hopefully this year should be married but it's another hope. The amount of time I thought of doing sangat, simran and seva on a daily basis. Putting in 2.5 hours a day in extra prayers (exclude this time from 5 baanias)... It's been on and off but thas the problem. OFF! Off should not exist only ON. On for all 7 days. We all should reflect back once in a while on our Jeevan. Maybe your still in youth, 40, 50's or 70's! Are you where you are and where you thought you wanted to be in your spiritual life? Maybe you are? Share your story on here.
  7. Guest

    sikh morality code

    Hi. So I had this idea of putting together a 'morality code', initially for youth, but also for older sikhs we want to connect more with the religion and also for non-sikhs interested to learn. I want all the rules to be based on teachings of SGGS. Sort a basic moral guidance based in Gurbani. I invite you all to suggest alterations and additions. It would be good to have Gurbani quotes to go with the list, but I'm have not memorised SGGS well enough, so if anyone can help with that too, that would be good. Moral 'guides' for sikhs: 1. Always remember God/Gods name. This is a must. You can do this while living your day to day life. As per Gurbani, to do Naam Simran is to live, and to forget it is to die. The definition of maya is whatever makes you forget God. God and His Name are the same. You remember one, you remember the other. You can (and should) remember Him in a natural and unstrained manner. Remembering Him also means remembering He is nearby. The gradual aim is to remember Him with each breath and morsel of food and drink. 2. Always remember God's Will. What is Gods Will? It is the supreme power, by which everything happens. As per Gurbani, the definition of blindness is forgetting God's will. 3. Be an honest person. This means- don't tell lies, don't deceive people. Its doesn't that you have to walk down the road with a megaphone, announcing your deepest darkest secrets. But it means that you should not deceive people. Be one person, inside and out. Don't lead 'double lives'. If you are an adult, earn money honestly (not by cheating or slacking off your job). 4. Don't have any hatred. Instead of hatred, seek wisdom. 5. Don't have any fear, and don't put fear into anyone. Have faith in God instead. Not having fear does not mean getting into fights or climbing tall buildings or playing stupid 'dare' games- these things are actually the signs of fearful people battling repressed fears. 6. Don't slander or gossip about anyone. Avoid anyone who does. Do not mind if anyone slanders you, just see it as a cleansing exercise (gives you humility). 7. Avoid bad company. Remember that someone may seem religious externally, but may have bad characteristics. don't judge people by external appearances. 8. Avoid the five thieves/ demons- lust, anger, pride, enchantment (mohe) and greed. Recognise them for what they are- demons (that posses and drive people to do evil things they wouldn't otherwise do) and thieves (that steal people's wisdom, self-control and intelligence). 9. Show kindness (dayal) and forgiveness. 10. Believe that God exists and trust Him. 11. Follow Gurbani instead of precepts of mind (manmukhi). 12. Get up early. Keep God hygiene. Practise Naam Simran in a seated position, with concentration in the morning. 13. Show respect to your parents and your elders. Don't criticise them for their flaws. Don't deceive them, speak rudely to them. Show them consideration. Treat all elderly people like they are your grandparents. 14. Speak softly, and avoid bad language. Guru ji says talking filth is like putting filth into your mouth. Speak only truth, but do so in a kind manner. Know when it is better to keep quiet. 15. Have good hygiene, show respect for the body God has given you. Have a neat appearance. Keep a good posture. 16. Do all your work honestly, and work hard. 17. Remember the poor and needy and do something for them. E.g. give to the homeless. Give dasvand if you are earning money.
  8. Waheguru Ji Ka Khalsa, Waheguru Ji Ki Fateh. I was just wondering (after spending some going through the pages of some Sikh Organisations/personalities on facebook and instagram) that what exactly does it take for a person to become a Sikh Parcharik. In the modern day, we have, sadly, limited young parchariks who are truly dedicated to Sikhi (in and out) and can set as role model to the panth themselves, especially the younger generations outside India. Anyway, I found many who do regular kirtan are not following rehat (not hating, no worries) even though they sing bani beautifully, while some camp organisers/helpers also do not seem to be following rehat. While they are doing sewa, the thing that made me ask about the requirements for a person to become a parcharik/start a sikh organisation or participate in committee is that: a few days ago, i was listening to katha and they mentioned about great parchariks (during Guru Arjan Dev Ji's time, if i am not wrong) who preached very beautifully to others but cried to guru ji because their life was very different from what they preached to people. So who can take up the sewa of parchar? Who should be handling Sikh Organisations and Committee, (or even Charities)?
  9. Seeing how young Sikhs of today are surrounded by so many different ideologies, religions, sexualities, etc in a very confusing world of competing idea's how would you raise your kids to learn and be proud Sikhs? Even if they do not take amrit or keep their unshorn hair, how would you instill that loyalty to sikhi and pride in them?
  10. I started this thread because I think we need to invest into Punjab and fix it, Punjab needs Literate youths, more education, more industries, destroyal of the caste system, we need to fix the Drug and Water Crisis, A excellent link to some videos have been sent to me in my messages. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0ZKK3T484Kg https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AwWHyVy2eJY https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bZhFTMeS22g https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=29XNCfwidMI And the same user made a great post about this problem in the Khalistan thread. What are some ways we can Fix Punjab, name some problems and solutions, some organizations that is fixing punjab, and we need to actually invest money and donate and help the cause instead of just talking about it on the forums, We together as a community can not only fix punjab and help the youth but we can make India and the Future a better place together!
  11. Educatetosave.com I recently attended a program and Bhai Veer Manpreet singh performed kirtan of very high quality. Searching his next venue, I was determined to reach on time for more. I may have been a bit blind to how we can all help alleviate the immediate dangers to Punjab population which are being highlighted in the media now. However after half an hour of a video show and a touching speech, the solution has been found in sponsoring education to the poor villages in Punjab. Baba Ji who runs Baru Sahib now has a plan for which he needs help from all of us - which if I am not wrong was providing 10,000 places all free to support children whose fathers may have committed suicide, or may have succumbed to alcohol and passed away at an early age. The truth brought tears to many eyes - it is very sad. The statistics of near extinction of the Sikh youth are very worrying. However if we all come together and support this charity by sponsoring a child for £25, we could make a great difference to the future of Punjab. A similar program will be held at Park Avenue - Sri Guru Singh sabha on the 18th of March. All proceeds will be donated to educatetosave.com - same as they were today. Baba Ji has achieved amazing results, I would say - in terms of what he has managed to do for poor families in India. His institutes have managed to create amazing kirtaniyas like Bhai veer Manpreet Singh Himself too who is an ex-student of Baru Sahib. Babaji is now well into his 90s and still has plans to continue building new schools. We should be thankful for all the luxuries we live in. Cars, grand houses, latest mobile phones, new clean clothes, happy families and good education. As Sikhs we should all spare some time to think and devote to those who will carry on the legacy of the Gurus - who will look after our Guradwaras in India - Harmander Sahib, Amritsar Sahib and many others. Posting our opinions on the internet and mere debates on Punjab and its sorry state will not help anyone. We need to remember that they are not there our of their own will. This has been the result of a forethought plan which has disabled them to the verge of extinction. The least we can do is support organisations and people who have volunteered to go and offer help single handedly. Let us not leave them begging for little donations while we turn a blind eye and go on to enjoy our little luxuries. By supporting these organisations we will be doing what Guru Ji taught us - sacha saudha. Our money will be used not only to educate a poor child but also to bring them up in the way of Sikhi as each child performs nitnem everyday at Amrit vela.
  12. Happened to attend a boy's 16th birthday paath at a Gurdwara. After the ardaas and hukamnama, I expected the teen to be given a siropa. He was sitting next to me so I said to him to get ready to go up and matha tek. He had no idea about what was going to happen. Duly, he was called to the front, matta tuk and was given a siropa. He sat down and put it on the floor. I told him to not do so and to place it on his lap or even hold it. After a few seconds, he put it back on the floor. Why? Because his dad told him to do so. I can understand the boy not knowing what a siropa is. I know I struggled to understand such concepts at his age, though I'd learnt 80% of my Sikhi knowledge by that point. What I can't understand is when the parents don't know what it means.
  13. I'm wondering after the baba jee pillars and elderly leaders of the Sikh community of the present time pass on....... have we got up and coming charismatic youth leaders to take their place? Or will be Sikh masses be left to their own devices and no longer an effective force against those who wish our community ill will. I can see within 5-10 years when the leaders who lived in the times of 1984 and put all their energy fighting for Sikh rights and khalistan pass on there will be no one influential will left to fight for the rights of the community.
  14. Please check out our website, and register online! Only a few spots are remaining. http://www.wcsikhicamp.com
  15. Waheguru Ji Ka Khalsa Waheguru Ji Ki Fateh West Coast Sikhi Camp (California) is just around the corner. There are only a handful of spots remaining. This is a really good retreat for amritdharis to rejuvenate, as well as for those people who are new to Sikhi. Camp is open to Sikh youth and teenagers. Please check out our website on www.wcsikhicamp.com
  16. Sorry, not the next season of Game of Thrones, but even better!!! First Annual Waterloo Sikh Youth WINTER Camp! Saturday, December 20th & Sunday, December 21st, 2014 Kitchener Gurughar Saahib 2070 Snyders Rd East, Petersburg, ON Cost: FREE (Optional Long Sleeve Camp Shirt is $15) Sign up NOW as a Camper (Ages 5-18) or a Sevadar (18+) using the same form below: SIGN UP HERE Similar structure to our annual summer camp, we now add a Winter initiative for the kids. The camp is completely FREE, however we do accept donations. This Sikh Youth Camp has been designed to bring all the Youth together to share knowledge of Sikhi and to promote Sikhi to our future. It will be run by qualified individuals from all over Ontario. Working together we shall achieve an important element in Sikhi, which is Sangat. Included in Sangat your child will have inspiring role models who are enthusiastic about instilling the Sikhi spirit within these young minds. We do encourage older youth and adults to take part in camp as well. This initiative is now a part of Toronto Singhs Camp. The youth are expected to stay at the Gurughar during the entire duration of the camp. Also, we feel very strongly about the comfort issues parents have, and would like to ensure you all that your children will be in good/safe hands. Our team consists of highly qualified and mature individuals. For optional overnight stay, the girls (Campers and Sevadaars) will be sleeping upstairs in a room that will be locked throughout the night. The boys (Campers and Sevadaars) will be sleeping downstairs and that room will also be locked. These two areas are completely separate from one another. Sevadaars will be patrolling throughout the day and night to ensure everyone’s safety and of course if any campers need to use the washroom during the night or if there are any other emergencies. The Gurudwara has security cameras which will be monitored at all times throughout the camp to ensure the safety of your child. Campers will be participating in a range of activities which may include the following: keertan darbars, workshops, lectures, arts/crafts, outdoor activities, fitness classes, and any other activities that Sevadaars may deem fit for this camp. All activities will be taking place on Gurudwara property and at no time will campers be given permission to leave Gurudwara grounds unless they are with their respective Parents/Guardians. Camp Agendas will be posted at the Gurudwara and e-mailed out closer to the camp date. For more information, please contact us at one of the links below: Facebook.com/waterloocamp Instagram.com/waterloocamp Facebook Event Email: WaterlooSikhYouthCamp@gmail.com Vaheguru ji ka khalsa, Vaheguruu ji ki fateh!
  17. Simran at woolwich gurdwara's every second saturday of the month. Details for rest of the yeat attached. Please attend with family. Upcoming days: Saturday 16th August Calderwood street gurudwara Saturday 13th September Masons hill Woolwich Gurudwara simran.bmp
  18. Do you think that many Sikh youth today should influenced into doing Sikhi parchar?I know it might be a lifetime job or can be a part time job but if you look at our quality within our quantity (24Mill) the state of the panth is pretty bad and silent. Our population is decreasing. The Akal Takhat jathedar telling us to have 4 kids is a excuse for his poor management of parchar in punjab (no surprise). I really think the upcoming generation can use a lot of parchariks to make Sikhs keep their faith intact and welcome others into Sikhi. Many will disagree with me on the part that Sikhs are more about quality than quantity that is very true but it can become a problem like today. Now we can take the example of Muslims who have tremendous amount of money put into making Muslim centers just to discuss and teach Muslims and others about Islam. In America alone, Muslim population has doubled since 9/11. We have rarely any Sikh centres and our gurdwaras are just a go and eat place. We are a rich minority population in many countries. Our population has swerved up just a notch but many are leaving our faith and many have decided to get rid of kesh. I really think the older generation of Sikhs have done great jobs making gurdwaras and running them but the lack of parchar is pretty sad even here in America. The amount missionaries in Punjab that are just blindly converting Sikhs is plain said. I really think we can use more parchariks to bring Sikhi awareness and strength for the future of the Panth. Any opinions on this? http://www.sikh24.com/2014/03/akal-takht-jathedar-expresses-worry-of-sikh-population-decreasing/#.U4LUh_ldV6A http://www.nydailynews.com/news/national/number-muslims-u-s-doubles-9-11-article-1.1071895
  19. Vaheguru Ji Ka Khalsa Vaheguru Ji Ki Fateh I had the privilege to attend last year and it was amazing. Spread the word, a lot of great speakers and sangat with a beautiful campsite.
  20. We have been asked to take part in a show on sikh channel tonight sunday 29th September On how gurdwaras should be supporting the youth Some ideas we will be discussing - classes held in gurdwaras - youth clubs - social workers available in gurdwara - english translations - martial arts classes - english speaking gyanis - financial support for youth projects Would very much like to ask if anyone has any particular issues they would like us to raise And would also appreciate any feedback after the show.
  21. I hope this is allowed and the sangat can be mature about this. We shouldn't suppress such discussions as they cause more problems if we can't understand them. Becoming addicted to such things will deprive you of success in everything* in life.
  22. Walk a mile in a Sikh’s turban Thursday at University of Guelph Preetam Singh, 20, describes his religious conviction as a love affair with God. The University of Guelph student is helping to organize the Sikh Students' Association's Sikh Awareness Day on Thursday. Non-Sikhs will get the opportunity to experience what it is like to wear turban. Rob O'Flanagan/Mercury staff GUELPH—A Sikh’s turban, or dastar, is a symbol of religious devotion and a mark of personal courage. It and other elements of customary Sikhi dress distinguish followers of the religion from others in Canadian society, and that distinction is not without challenges. The Sikh Student Association at the University of Guelph will hold a Sikh Awareness Day on Thursday, giving non-Sikhs an opportunity to experience what it is like to wear a turban. The event is patterned after others on Canadian campuses aimed at familiarizing Canadians with Sikh beliefs and inviting them to experience both the highs and lows of wearing the dastar. Preetam Singh, 20, was a striking figure over the weekend on the U of G campus, wearing flowing dark bana—traditional attire—with his high, dark blue dastar covering his uncut hair, and a kirpan—dagger—strapped to this hip. “As soon as I walk in a room I have people’s attention,” Singh said. “It gives me the opportunity to teach people something about my faith.” The Sikhi way of life, he added, has timeless and holistic qualities. While the rules, ethics and customs of society are constantly changing, the teachings of the faith remain stable. His religion, he said, is a love affair, and one he entered into of his own volition at the age of 13. “I think of it as falling in love,” said the U of G history student. “You don’t choose who you fall in love with, or when you are going to fall in love. You have no power over it. I never thought that I was going to be as religious as I am now.” As with other religions, Sikhs strive to be constantly mindful of the presence of God in their day-to-day lives. It’s a devotional ambition to which Singh is committed. “Everyday is a challenge to make yourself better,” he said. “It’s never good enough. You always have to work for something more, to try harder and strive for higher ideals. Ideals are perfection and we are imperfect as human beings.” Being easily identifiable as an adherent to a particular faith, he said, puts an onus of responsibility upon a Sikh. “As a Sikh I know that people know immediately that I am different, that I am religious,” he said. “If someone knows that I am a Sikh then I am representing the Sikh faith. All my actions represent the Sikh faith—what I say, what I do, how I act. It gives you a lot of responsibility, and I have to really strive to put the Sikh faith in a better light.” Sikhs do face overt discrimination because of their appearance, Singh said. Mass media, he said, has associated the wearing of a turban with perpetrators of terrorist acts, and that negative and unfair association has been applied to Sikhs. “I think it is very important for us to propagate the wearing of the turban, and to have people know the difference between the Sikh religion and other religions, and why we wear a turban,” Singh said. “It is a show of peace.” The Sikh religion—the term Sikhism is not proper—began in the late 1400s in the Punjab region of India. It has no clergy. The faith promotes the equality of all human beings, social justice, the removal of superstition and blind ritual from religious life, earning an honest living, and circumventing worldly desires and sin. There are about 20 million Sikhs worldwide, and it is estimated there are more than 300,000 in Canada. To be a part of the Khalsa, or collective body of the faith, one must wear five kakars, or articles of faith, on their person, including uncut hair, a wooden comb, a metal bracelet, special cotton undergarments, and the dagger. Thursday’s Sikh Awareness Day, sponsored by the Sikh Student Association, runs throughout the day in the University Centre and is a chance to “walk in the shoes of a Sikh for one day.” roflanagan@guelphmercury.com [www.guelphmercury.com]
  23. Vaheguru ji ka Khalsa, Vaheguru ji ki Fateh Sangat ji, you may not have heard of "Everythings 13" a sikh educational charity, however some of you may know about our YouTube channel "Basics of Sikhi". Most of you may not be aware that (with Guruji's kirpa and aagiaa) we're embarking on a new and comprehensive project to spread Guruji wisdom across the UK and Globally. Its called Plan BE13. Here is what our channel has on it currently.. Here is a video about Plan BE13 for 2013 Essentially we are hoping to do a 5 stage process of Parchar (1) Getting people into Sikhi (already happening) - Talks at Gurdwaras and Sikh Societies at colleges and Universities to interest youth/others into Sikhi and bring onto youtube channel - Spreading word about the Youtube Channel using facebook, twitter and and getting people into watching videos about Sikhi when they have spare time (there are around 80 videos on our youtube channel already) (2) Building a solid foundation (already happening) - holding a One Day Course +Kirtan Katha called "Re-Assessing the Fundamentals - Vaheguru, Guru and You" at various Gurdwaras (first one is due at Park Avenue Gurdwara Main Hall on the 29th December 2012) - 12 topic introductory course to Sikhi - called the WhyGuru Course. This course goes through the history of Sikhi from Guru Nanak to the present day and also has 4 separate topics which cover Guru Granth Sahib ji, The Khalsa, Raag Kirtan and Sikh Spiritual concepts of merging with the Divine. We already delivered this once in May this year and it was a success. (there is a video about this on our channel with video testimonials - we had 5 non-punjabi people attend. One lady, ex-muslim convert has now taken Amrit). (3) Learning Basics of Gurmukhi (planning done, needs filming) - A series of videos that goes into Why its important we learn Gurmukhi and How does Gurmukhi work? (Penti Akhar, Moharni) - Series of common vocabulary in Gurmukhi and how the words are put together - Basics of Santhiya - Slow paat, in video format with downloadable MP3s (4) Japji Sahib Vichaar classes (already happening) - We're doing weekly English katha of Japji Sahib and with Guru's kirpa are at the 34th Pauri. - Katha will be transcripted and put into an ebook format - Set up Japji Sahib Vichaar classes at variour gurdwaras where attendees would learn in their own time (watch the video, read ebook, watch/listen to other recommended katha (English by Bhai Sukhraj Singh, Punjabi- Maskeen ji, Giani Pinderpal Singh etc) and then come together for the vichaar class at their local gurdwara (ie build a sadhsangat) to discuss Japji sahib, pauri by Pauri. (5) Further Study (to be developed as part of Plan BE13) - More Gurbani Katha - planning on Rehras sahib and Asa Di Vaar - Basics of Kirtan and Tabla - Attend an intermediate level - "WhyKhalsa WhyFateh Course" In terms of funding, our parent we've raised about £18k of our £52k target for 2013 already. 99% of this has come from the sangat, (mostly youth and non-amritdhari). We're not charging anything for katha or the courses, as we see this as Spiritual Langar (Bhugat Giaan) which should be given freely and be dependent purely on Sangat kirpa (daeaa bhandarani). Read more about the specifics of Plan BE13 here: http://www.virginmoneygiving/charities/everythings13 Please do ardaas for us to Satguru that we stay on this path and stay true to Sikhi. Thanks for reading ji, bhul chuk maaf Vaheguru ji ka Khalsa, Vaheguru ji ki Fateh
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