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IS THIS FROM BLUE STAR


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Words boost people and up lift the fighters, but its not enough to take on a army which what the Singh done.

Had Gen Shahbeg Singh not been on the scene it could have been a walk over for the other side.

As soon as the army entered they were met with shots from Singhs from below, the army expected fire shot to come from above or the same level.

Shots from below are again signs of gurrila war fare, which is what Gen Shahbegh Singh was known for.

your totally right, the great general shabeg singh ji's role has not been clearly illustrated to sikhs up until today

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All journalism was blacked out and banned.

These photos are either from someone from sangat with a camera, or journalists who were present at Sri Harmandar Sahib prior to the battle.

During Operation Bluestar all there was a total curfew, and all journalists were ordered to leave Amritsar especially. One journalist Brahma Chellany, risked his life, and stayed back. It was Brahma Chellany who exposed what the army had done first in the india and world media. He was the arrested and charged by the indian govt of "waging war against the indian state..."
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A bit more info on Brahma Chellaney thanks to Google:

Coverage of Operation Bluestar

Main article: Operation Bluestar

Professor Chellaney began his career as a journalist in his early 20s, working as the South Asia correspondent of the leading international wire service, Associated Press. Although he worked as a journalist only for a couple of years, he covered, as AP correspondent, the June 1984 Indian security operation, known as Operation Blue Star, to flush out heavily armed Sikh militants holed up in the sprawling complex of the Golden Temple, the holiest Sikh shrine. His exclusive coverage won him a prestigious journalism award—a Citation for Excellence in 1985 by the Overseas Press Club, New York. Mr. Chellaney later finished his Ph.D. and entered academia.

Before the storming of Golden Temple by Indian Army starting on June 3, 1984, a media blackout was enforced.[19][20][21] Brahma Chellaney of the Associated Press was the only foreign reporter who managed to stay on in Amritsar.[22]

His first dispatch, front-paged by the New York Times, The Times of London and The Guardian, reported a death toll about twice of what authorities had admitted. According to the dispatch, about 780 militants and civilians and 400 troops had perished in fierce gunbattles. The high casualty rates among security forces were attributed to "the presence of such sophisticated weapons as medium machine guns and rockets in the terrorists' arsenal."[23] Mr. Chellaney also reported that "several" suspected Sikh militants had been shot with their hands tied.[24] The dispatch, after its first paragraph reference to "several" such deaths, specified later that "eight to 10" men had been shot in that fashion.[24][25] The number of casualties reported by Mr. Chellaney were far more than government reports,[26] and embarrassed the Indian government, which disputed his facts.[27][28] The Associated Press stood by the reports and figures, the accuracy of which was also "supported by Indian and other press accounts" according to Associated Press; and reports in The Times and The New York Times.[29]

The government cited Mr. Chellaney's dispatches published in the New York Times, The Times of London and The Guardian to accuse him and the Associated Press of breaking the press-censorship order that had been promulgated in the state of Punjab.[30] There were three reasons why no formal charges were ever filed. First, the government threat caused outrage in the journalism world[31] and civil liberties organizations.[32] The New York Times took the lead, carrying several editorials severely criticizing Indian authorities. In one editorial, titled "Truth on Trial—in India," it said Mr. Chellaney "provoked displeasure by doing his job too well."[33] The Associated Press Managing Editors Association, comprising editors of major U.S. newspapers, adopted a resolution calling on the Indian government to "cease all proceedings, under way and contemplated," pointing out that '"responsible Indian officials have corroborated Mr. Chellaney's news dispatches from Amritsar."[34] Other media organizations also protested.[35][36][37]

Second, the Associated Press and Mr. Chellaney took the case to the Supreme Court of India, which set up a full constitutional bench to hear the matter. The government act was also challenged as "unconstitutional" by Maharaja of Patiala, Amrinder Singh, in a separate application filed in the Supreme Court.[32] Third, Mr. Chellaney's reporting had been corroborated by several other Indian publications and by the army general who commanded Operation Blue Star, Krishnaswamy Sundarji. Sundarji, in an interview to the now-defunct Illustrated Weekly of India, confirmed Mr. Chellaney's death toll of nearly 1,200 in that operation. As a top editor of the Indian Express later wrote, investigations by the newspaper "found that what Chellaney had written was absolutely correct."[38]

The pending preliminary investigations were formally dropped in September 1985.[39][40] "Mr. Chellaney's only offenses were enterprise and accuracy," the New York Times editorialized, hailing the decision.[41]

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Thanks for the additional info.

What is surprising though that despite all the world press, inc USA criticize india over its conduct, journalists were still scared to make truthful reports that displeased either the punjab police or the indian govt, up until around the late 1990s. They were as scared of the police as the normal public.

I remember once when kp gill had some journalists beaten up at a press conference by the police.

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Thanks for the additional info.

What is surprising though that despite all the world press, inc USA criticize india over its conduct, journalists were still scared to make truthful reports that displeased either the punjab police or the indian govt, up until around the late 1990s. They were as scared of the police as the normal public.

I remember once when kp gill had some journalists beaten up at a press conference by the police.

Its still the case that not only journalists do not say anything about the Genocide, but our numerous Babas and Sants of all groups hardly mention what happened in the last 30 years. They will talk about attrocitcies by Moghuls or Afghans and do not hestitate to attack others about not following the correct religious conduct.But are silent on the Genocide.

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