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I Am Christian Going To A Sikh Funeral


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I am a Christian but my best friend is Sikh and his grandmother passed away. I am going to the funeral tomorrow but I want to be prepared so that my wife and I do not offend anyone by dressing and/or acting inappropriately. I would appreciate any help that you could offer so that I may pay the proper respect and not embarrass my friend.

Thank you

Phil

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Guest Jacfsing2

I am a Christian but my best friend is Sikh and his grandmother passed away. I am going to the funeral tomorrow but I want to be prepared so that my wife and I do not offend anyone by dressing and/or acting inappropriately. I would appreciate any help that you could offer so that I may pay the proper respect and not embarrass my friend.

Thank you

Phil

Try not to wear a coat and tie like some people wear at Christian funerals and don't make your wife wear a mounting veil. Just follow what the guy above me said for everything else.
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  • 1 month later...

Try not to wear a coat and tie like some people wear at Christian funerals and don't make your wife wear a mounting veil. Just follow what the guy above me said for everything else.

Whats wrong with a coat and tie and a veil? It may not be Punjabi culture however it is a form of respect.

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Is it the same western veil? Wondering why it was banned,

http://www.sikhiwiki.org/index.php/Purdah

Purdah is a discriminatory system of dress use which was prevalent in India and other surrounding countries where the women had to cover their face (and the rest of their bodies) from men by using a veil or other clothing. The women were forced to wear a veil or "Burkah" whenever there was a likelihood of meeting a man.

The Sikh Gurus preached and banned this custom and Sikhs are strictly prohibited from practising this custom. Guru Nanak, the founder of the Sikh religion instructed all devotees to only approach him without "Purdah" or veil. When the Raja (king) of Haripur came to see Guru Amar Das, the Guru insisted that the king first partake a common meal from the community kitchen, called langar, irrespective of his caste and high social status. The Raja obliged and had an audience with the Guru.

However, one of his queens refused to lift the veil from her face, so Guru Amar Das refused to meet her and asked her to remove the veil. Guru Amar Das not only preached the equality of people irrespective of their caste and race but he also foster the ideal of equality of women. He preached the liberation of women from the practices of purdah (wearing a veil) as well as preaching strongly against the practice of sati (Hindu wife burning on her husband's funeral pyre). Guru Amar Das also disapproved of a widow remaining unmarried for the rest of her life.

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http://www.sikhiwiki.org/index.php/Purdah

Purdah is a discriminatory system of dress use which was prevalent in India and other surrounding countries where the women had to cover their face (and the rest of their bodies) from men by using a veil or other clothing. The women were forced to wear a veil or "Burkah" whenever there was a likelihood of meeting a man.

The Sikh Gurus preached and banned this custom and Sikhs are strictly prohibited from practising this custom. Guru Nanak, the founder of the Sikh religion instructed all devotees to only approach him without "Purdah" or veil. When the Raja (king) of Haripur came to see Guru Amar Das, the Guru insisted that the king first partake a common meal from the community kitchen, called langar, irrespective of his caste and high social status. The Raja obliged and had an audience with the Guru.

However, one of his queens refused to lift the veil from her face, so Guru Amar Das refused to meet her and asked her to remove the veil. Guru Amar Das not only preached the equality of people irrespective of their caste and race but he also foster the ideal of equality of women. He preached the liberation of women from the practices of purdah (wearing a veil) as well as preaching strongly against the practice of sati (Hindu wife burning on her husband's funeral pyre). Guru Amar Das also disapproved of a widow remaining unmarried for the rest of her life.

The western veil is definitely not comparable to the type of veil you mentioned. Am I right?

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  • 4 years later...

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